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''Shroom gathering in South Africa ... Western Cape


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#1 RichShroom

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 05:41 PM

Howzit again

I'm looking for any advice or guidance about local 'shroom gathering around Cape Town.

On occasional walks through Newlands forest, I've seen all sorts of funghi growing on the ground and on trees - both living and dead trunks - from the ordinary stem & capped sorts, to exotic fans.

I figure that local conditions some-where, some-time must be just perfect for some psi' shrooms, and am keen to do some learning if anyone can share some personal knowledge or point me towards any useful links or print references.

Also, by any chance, has anyone come across a local mushroom gathering 'club' or 'fraternity' that go rambling and hunting for "general edibles" - I reckon a good option is to get to know some of the old-timers who have the 1st hand knowledge in their heads.

From my initial research, these are the indigenous species:

* Panaeolus semiovatus var. phalaenarum
- reportedly found near Cape Town in cow dung by a shroomery.org member
* Psilocybe Cubensis 'African Transkei'
- does this occur further down South ?
* Psilocybe Cubensis Natalensis
- reportedly found on a college campus in Natal - (UKN-Pmb or UKN-Dbn I'm guessing)
- again does this occur further down South ?

And also:
* Papilionaceus
* Amanita
- but I've heard the high is different & not to everyone's enjoyment ... anyone care to explain more about that ?

^ Additions to, or comments about the above would be greatly appreciated ^

As well as general answers to:

  • when is our local natural outdoor season - what months
  • what are the conditions to look out for - what prevailing weather circumstances

I could also ask for suggestions on where to look, but the sensible voice in my head tells me that people are unlikely to publicly invite a herd of tripping elephants to trample and raid their divine foodstuff patch ...

So instead I'll ask in general what sort of places or under which sorts of location conditions should I be exploring for greatest chance of a decent find.

Of course the answer to that one could vary from species to species - so any specific species/habitat combinations would be champion.

Thanks & eyrie
Rich

#2 Paraboloid

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 07:59 PM

strain of cube doesnt matter, strain doesnt mean its more potent or w/e, it just means this mushroom looks a certain way usually, but to me all cubes (except albino and PE) look the same.
every cubensis u find growing wild is its own strain.
a cube is a cube is a cube is a cube.

papilionaceus isnt active.

and the high from amanitas isnt just "different", they dont contain psilocybin at all, they will make you feel drunk, sweat profusely, probably vomit or have diarrhea, you might get vertigo, etc, and at most you might see the walls melting and/or feel like your falling back and forth between worlds, but its usually not enjoyable and theres very few "fireworks" or "flashy effects"
ive taken it many times, and find it a useful tool, but most people have horrific trips from it and you will find those experiences documented at erowid.org.
its really not worth your time if you dont know what to expect and your mostly interested in psilocybin intoxication.

South Africa
Gymnopilus sp.
Panaeolus cinctulus
Psilocybe natalensis
Psilocybe semilanceata


those are the mushrooms that grow in your area, look up their growth characteristics (what temps make them fruit), and find out for yourself according to your local weather when they might pop up.
sounds to me like natalensis is its own species and not a strain of cubensis.

#3 ThEjOkEr

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 05:34 PM

Dude...

Shrooming in cpt more specifically at "The Whale Watch" in Glencairn Heights will be one of your ultimate experiences ever!!! But with that there is always a cost.. yip shrooming in cpt is expensive because these wisdom makers are so hard to find!!!!! They dont just grow outside your backdoor garden unfortunately.

I went on several hunts on magic mushrooms but I'm sorry to say that they very rare to obtain and the reason I use the word 'rare' and not "impossible' is because when I do a purchase by some dealer I tend to ingest a nice sum of soil along with my mushies.. yeah, so they are being picked from somewhere and being sold that will cost you an arm.. or two.

But if you do come across these mushies on some field, forest, farm or cow dung then do be great friend and let me know of the location. I would really love to clone these babies some day hoping that it will be sooner than later.

Goodluck with the hunting...

#4 spyker

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 11:58 AM

Only active i found in the cape are the Gymnopilus sp. but they are viele bitter and I never got high :) Subs in garden route upwards, Cubes in Kei, Natalensis in Natal.. Unnamed active pans in kei. Active blueing bolete found in karoo wooded areas and bushveld after rain ;)

#5 mjshroomer

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 09:27 AM

Howzit again


From my initial research, these are the indigenous species:


* Psilocybe Cubensis 'African Transkei'
- does this occur further down South ?

* Psilocybe Cubensis Natalensis
- reportedly found on a college campus in Natal - (UKN-Pmb or UKN-Dbn I'm guessing)
- again does this occur further down South ?

Rich



First, the cubensis referred to as Transkei is the strain developed from a wild cube.

Check the cutivation of species link on this page at my web site.

http://www.mushroomj...org/species.htm

Once on the cultivation link to various species. look for the South African link,

There are no wild P. cubensis transkei's. The strain was developed from a collected wild specimen.

And P. natalensis is not P. cubensis natalensis.

The species is P. natalensis and it does not grow directly in manure as does P. cubensis.

It was discovered in Natal in a Royal National Preserve By Garzt, Eicker and others, and several years later at a 2nd location in Natal about 200 kms from the original collection, both in Pretoria Prefect or Province. Not sure what your districts are referred to in S.A.

There are also species of Copelandia in Africa, also referred to as Panaeolus, the primary species is Copelandia cyanescens and Copelandia africanus, both known as Panaeolus cyanescens and panaeolus africanus/

Here are 5 photos of P. natalensis. with very long thin stems from Natal. At O'Neil's Cottage between Volksrust and Bristol, temperate zone at least at 1500 m. Natal, South Africa (Original collection).
Papers on this species are posted at this site by me somewhere. Use the search engine or ask Hippie3

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1260455136

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1260455136

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1260455136

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1260455136

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1260455136

mjshroomer

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#6 Phlux-

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Posted 20 December 2009 - 01:01 AM

on a recent mu hunting trip in the midlands - i came across mushies almost identical to those natalensis - but they didnt bruise blue - do they always bruise blue ?
also the subbs seemed common there - need a better id tho.

#7 mjshroomer

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Posted 20 December 2009 - 02:01 PM

on a recent mu hunting trip in the midlands - i came across mushies almost identical to those natalensis - but they didnt bruise blue - do they always bruise blue ?
also the subbs seemed common there - need a better id tho.



PSilocybe natalensis is a bluing Psilocybe and has always in all collections in Pretoria, been identified in herbarium specimens by Eicker, Smith, Gartz and others as having bluing in the stem after human handling.''As for subbs, I see very few references ever tht they are comon in Africa. Yes they are there but you are the first person I have ever heard nention them as being common.

ANd the mushrooms you say you came upon that liiked almost identical to Natalenesis are most likely either a species of Hypholoma or Stropharia.

AFRICA
Widely distributed or no reported distribution
Amanita muscaria (Hongo, 1959)
A. pantherina (Hongo, 1959)
Claviceps paspali Grasso, 1955)
C. purpurea (Abou-Chaar et al., 1961; Wasson et al., 1978, northern; Dickinson & Lucas, 1983)
Copelandia tropicalis (Ola'h, 1969; Weeks et al., 1979; Gartz, 1996; Stamets, 1996)
Gymnopilus spectabilis (Hongo, 1959; Dennis, 1986, northern Africa)
Inocybe corydalina (Dennis, 1986, northern Africa)
Panaeolina foenisecii (Hongo, 1959)
Panaeolus africanus (Gartz, 1996)
P. fimicola (Dennis, 1986, North Africa; Ola'h, 1969; Stamets, 1996)
P. microscporus (Ola'h, 1970)
P. papilionaceus (Hongo, 1959; Dennis, 1986, North Africa)
P. retirugis (Hongo, 1959)
P. sphinctrinus (Dennis, 1986 & Treu, 1996, both in North Africa)
P. subbalteatus (Ola'h, 1969; Hongo, 1959, 1976; Stamets, 1996; Pollock, 1976)
P. tropicalis (Ola'h, 1969)
Pluteus salicinus (Dennis, 1986, North Africa)
Psilocybe cyanescens (Gartz, 1996)
P. goniospora (Pegler, 1977; Guzmán, 1983)

Algeria
Claviceps purpurea (Grasso, 1955)
Psilocybe mairei (Malençon & Bertault, 1970; Singer & Smith, 1958; Guzmán, 1983)

Chad
Panaeolus africanus (Ola'h, 1968, 1969, 1970; Stamets, 1996)

Ethiopia
Claviceps purpurea (Hawksworth et al., 1955)

Ivory coast
Claviceps paspali (Grasso, 1955)
Conocybe sp? (Samorini, 1995)
Psilocybe sp? (Samorini, 1995)

Kenya
Panaeolus sp. (Vedcourt & Trump, 1969)
P. aquamarina (Pegler, 1977; Guzmán, 1995)
P. cubensis ? (as Stropharia sp. cf. cubensis, Vedcourt & Trump, 1969)
P. cubensis ? (was not a determined mushroom, close to Stropharia, Cullinan & Henry, 1945; Heim, 1978)
Psilocybe sp. (identified as Stropharia sp., Charters, 1957, 1958)

Madagascar (Malagasy Republic)
Copelandia cyanescens (Heim et al., 1967; Pollock, 1976; Heim, 1978)

Mauricio Island
Claviceps paspali (Grasso, 1955)
C. purpurea (Grasso, 1955)

Morocco (Maroc)
Amanita muscaria (Malençon & Bertault, 1970)
A. pantherina (Malençon & Bertault, 1970)
Copelandia bispora (Stamets, 1996; Weeks et al., 1979)
Inocybe calamistrata (Malençon & Bertault, 1970)
I. corydalina (Malençon & Bertault, 1970)
Panaeolus fimicola (Malençon & Bertault, 1970)
P. papilionaceus (Malençon & Bertault, 1970)
Pluteus cyanopus (Malençon & Bertault, 1970)
Pluteus atricapillus Malençon & Bertault, 1970)
P. salicinus (Malençon & Bertault, 1970)
P. villosus (Malençon & Bertault, 1970; Stijve & Kuyper, 1985)
Psilocybe mairei (Singer & Smith, 1958; Malençon & Bertault, 1970; Guzmán, 1983; Gartz, 1996; Stamets, 1996)

Republic of Central Africa
Panaeolus africanus (Ola'h, 1968, 1969; Gerhardt, 1996; Stamets, 1996)
P. microsporus (Ola´h, 1969, 1970; Gerhardt, 1996)
Pluteus atricapillus (Horak, 1978; Ohenoja et al., 1987)

Rhodesia
Claviceps paspali (Lovelen, 1964; Cooke, 1977)

South Africa
Amanita muscaria (Watt & Breyer-Brandwijk, 1962; Wieland, 1968; Ott, 1993)
A. pantherina (Watt & Breyer-Brandwijk, 1962); Ott, 1993)
Panaeolina foenisecii (Watt & Breyer-Brandwik, 1962)
Panaeolus papilionaceus (Watt & Breyer-Brandwik, 1962)
P. retirugis (Watt & Breyer-Brandwik, 1962)
P. subbalteatus (Watt & Breyer-Brandwik, 1962)

Pluteus salicinus (Stamets, 1996)
Psilocybe natalensis (Gartz et al., 1995; Gartz, 1996; Stamets, 1996)
P. semilanceata ?(Samorini, 1993)

Sudan
Panaeolus africanus (Ola'h, 1968, 1969, 1970; Stamets, 1996)

Tanzania
Amanita muscaria (Härkönen, 1995; Härkönen et al., 1994)
Copelandia tropicalis (Gerhardt, 1996)
Pluteus atricapillus (Pegler, 1977)

Uganda
Panaeolus papilionaceus (Gerhardt, 1996)
Psilocybe goniospora (Pegler, 1977)

Zaire
Copelandia cyanescens (Gerhardt, 1996)
Panaeolina foenisecii (Gerhardt, 1996)


In 1959, Hongo in his paper in Japanese dung inhabiting species noted the occurrence of Panaeolus subbalteatus as being found in Africa. HE provided no reference as to who collected such specimens in Africa of Panaeolus subbalteatus.

Then in 1962, mycologists, J. M. Watt & M. G. Breyer-Brandwik, reported in their book, " The medicinal and poisonous plants of Southern and Eastern Africa. Livingstone, Edinburgh, the collection from South Africa reported by Hongo in 1959.a collection from South Africa.

That same year and on two other occasions, other mycologists listed it as from Africa based on those two papers. In 50-years, only two collections of Panaeolus subbalteatus have been reported form the Continent of Africa, and are on deposit at a herbarium at the U. of Natal in Pretoria, South Aftica, so to say it is common is not correct.
Years later, Gyorgy-Miklos Ola'h (1969) Dr. Steven Hayden Pollock (1976) and Paul Stamets (1996, all reported Panaeolus subbalteatus from Africa, citing Hongo as his source.

And the above list is my reference of their citing references that it occurs in South Africa, but since it was only collected one time in South Africa and reported first by Japanese mycologist, t. Hongo in 1959.

Si it would seem that this mushroom is not that common in south africa since there is only one known reference to its being collected in 1959 and none since.


mjshroomer

#8 mjshroomer

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Posted 20 December 2009 - 02:04 PM

Only active i found in the cape are the Gymnopilus sp. but they are viele bitter and I never got high :) Subs in garden route upwards, Cubes in Kei, Natalensis in Natal.. Unnamed active pans in kei. Active blueing bolete found in karoo wooded areas and bushveld after rain ;)



Sorry but there are no active bluing boletes in Africa and none that are psilocybian anywhere in the world.

mjshroomer

#9 Phlux-

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 11:53 PM

yeah - well all the more reason to sort this out - il have to take another trip up there soon with my camera to put this to rest.

#10 Scratch

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 12:15 AM

Haven't seen RichShroom around the board lately.
Too bad, I enjoyed his posts.

#11 giminiboss

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Posted 24 November 2011 - 05:27 PM

Hey guys I'm from S A cape town I was jst wonder if maybe any of my fellow cpt ppl can give me some info into whre in cpt itself I can go hunt some of these good mushies I'm still new to topia only joined in abt a day ago so asb! Kaap mense spoeg my nat mt dai nodige info oor wa ek d mushies kn opspoor asb!

#12 Spliff

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 05:11 AM

haaaa, afrikaans, dis lekker die taal om te sein, vier jare en ek het dit niks gepraat nie.

Anyway, english...I once took a trip to the ski to do some surfing at a back packers around there, cant remember the name but it was a community church and this dude had a few rooms. I slept in the church as part of the group (I rolled a spliff on a pew), but there were two guys who got onto some cracker dried shrooms from some old man walking the fields, they had a mad time...well, I didnt see them for the rest of the afternoon until much later in the night. WhHo knows, but speaking to those medicine men in the rural of rural is the only place I have had the opportunity...that and Splashy fen, but thats a whole other story.




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