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Growing Oyster Mushrooms for Profit - from sporeprint to market


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#21 Brakiska

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 12:35 AM

Great idea to log this

Doing the same on my side.

Aquiring some of the tools required at the moment

Saving some money in order to move to a bigger place to set-up a good workplace

I wish you the best
Im sure you will be up to the challenge such a journey will give you

#22 the_chosen_one

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Posted 05 July 2009 - 12:21 AM

Good point about diversity TCO.
I tried painted suillus for the first time
last fall, and really liked them, sold a few
but it was too late in the season to really
get a feel for people's reaction.
What kind of lacaria and how much did
they bring? Also the toothed fungi, were
they Hericium?


laccaria amethystina (pic). excellent with red wine and other recipes. $15-$18/lb easy to restraunts. it's quite meaty and weighs a lot. it's s long lived winter time fuiter and keeps well when refrigerated. an all around good mushroom.

Hydnum umbilicatum. looks a bit like a toothed chanterelle. sorry. can't seem to find my pics at the moment.. at any rate these are true gourmet. $25/lb. pretty much anywhere. one of my all time favorites as well. :love:

oddly enough lions mane or it's cousins are difficult to market here. i think they kinda freak people out lol. which is fine.. more for me :heart:

#23 arcamedes333

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Posted 06 July 2009 - 11:21 AM

10-15$ a pound for oysters
where i live.
I appreciate you taking the
time to log your efforts. The
best of luck to you.:thumbup:

#24 shroom57

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 11:21 AM

"Pearl Oyster"
Pleurotus ostreatus (sn. salignus, spodoleucus)(var. columbinus ("Blue Oyster"), floridanus ("Florida"))

Temperatures: Spawn 24° C Primordia 10-16° C Fruiting 10-21° C
Humidity: ---------- 85-95% -----------95-100% --------- 85-90%
CO2: ------------ 5-20,000ppm ------ < 1,000ppm ------ < 1,000ppm
Light: ----------------- n/a ---------- 1,000-1,500lux ---- 1,000-1,500lux
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Golden Oyster"
Pleurotus citrinopileatus (sn. cornucopiae)

Temperatures: Spawn 24-29° C Primordia 21-27° C Fruiting 21-29° C
Humidity: ------------ 90-100% ------------98-100% --------- 90-95%
CO2: --------------- 5-20,000ppm ------ < 1,000ppm ------ < 1,000ppm
Light: ------------------- n/a ------------- 500-1,000lux ---- 500-1,000lux
Notes: Bitter until thoroughly cooked then cashew-like flavor. Color and flavor determined by light levels. Fragile, lower yields, loses color
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Pink Oyster"
Pleurotus djamour (sn. flabellatus, ostreato-roseus, salmoneo-stramineus)

Temperatures: Spawn 24-30° C Primordia 18-25° C Fruiting 20-30° C
Humidity: ------------ 95-100% -----------95-100% --------- 85-90%
CO2: ---------------- >5,000ppm ------ 500-1,000ppm --- 500-1,500ppm
Light: ------------------- n/a ------------ 750-1,500lux ---- 750-1,500lux
Notes: Good biological efficiency, very agressive, contaminant resitant.
Loses color on cooking, short shelf life unless dried.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"King Oyster"
Pleurotus eryngii (sn. fuscus, ferulae, nebrodensis, hadamardii, fossulatus)

Temperatures: Spawn 24° C Primordia 10-15° C Fruiting 15-21° C
Humidity: ------------ 90-95% ---------95-100% --------- 85-90%
CO2: -------------- 5-20,000ppm ---- 500-1,000ppm --- < 2,000ppm
Light: ------------------- n/a ---------- 500-1,000lux ---- 500-1,000lux
Notes: Grows well on logs, straw mounds, prefers outside. Best tasting, keeps and ships well. Favors high CO2 spawn run.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Abalone Oyster"
Pleurotus cystidiosus (sn. abalonus)

Temperatures: Spawn 24-30 C Primordia 18-24° C Fruiting 21-27° C
Humidity: ------------- 90-95% -----------95-100% --------- 85-90%
CO2: --------------- 5-20,000ppm ----- 500-1,000ppm ---- < 2,000ppm
Light: ------------------- n/a ----------- 1,000-2,000lux ---- 500-1,000lux
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Phoenix Oyster"
Pleurotus pulmonarius (sn. sapidus, sajor-caju (incorrectly))

Temperatures: Spawn 24-29° C Primordia 10-24° C Fruiting 18-24° C
Humidity: ------------- 95-100% -----------85-90% --------- 85-90%
CO2: ---------------- >5,000ppm -------- 400-800ppm ----- 400-800ppm
Light: ------------------- n/a ----------- 1,000-1,500lux --- 1,000-1,500lux
Notes: Prefers Aspen, Black Poplar
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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#25 Guest_milkman59_*

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 11:46 AM

great info on them oysters. anyone got a culture they'd like to trade for a zon print? pm me if interested i'd send 1st.

#26 the_chosen_one

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 12:55 PM

you'll need to get a good wood fiber supplier as well. here's my wholesale source.. http://www.northmaso....com/index.html

straw bales work fine for starting. even saw mills and county sources are good, but eventually you may want to go big. one can also find local distributors through the wholesalers links ;)

:heart:

#27 lysergic

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 01:07 PM

I'm interested!

I've been thinking about doing something like this for a while now.
I haven't been able to find a job, so this might provide some income.


I've got a few questions:

Are the prices listed for wet or dry weights?

How do oyster yields compare with cube yields?

How large of a grow would be needed to be worthwhile/profitable?

#28 the_chosen_one

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 02:12 PM

i usually do pretty well if i can pull in 20-40 lbs. wet. i have a tough competitor for dry here. at least for now :D

#29 lysergic

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 02:31 PM

i usually do pretty well if i can pull in 20-40 lbs. wet. i have a tough competitor for dry here. at least for now :D


Is that 20-40lbs from a single tub/grow?

How large of a substrate is necessary for that kind of yield?

Also, is their wet to dry ratio similar to cubes, or do they have more "meat" to them?


Thanks for the help :)

:heart:

#30 the_chosen_one

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 04:01 PM

Is that 20-40lbs from a single tub/grow?

How large of a substrate is necessary for that kind of yield?

Also, is their wet to dry ratio similar to cubes, or do they have more "meat" to them?


Thanks for the help :)

:heart:


crap! :mad: i just lost a mile long post.

short version - no tubs. too much space. 8" diameter tyvek logs 12" long. fruiting chambers are stor-pods like my clean room http://mycotopia.net...clean-room.html each pod can hold up to 60 logs fruiting from one end. 2 flushes per log and off to the burial ground which produces seasonal fruits for quite some time. it's all about speed and work to product ratios my friend. :)
i'll post some pics when i get fired back up. temporarily shut down while i have some family staying with me.

:heart:

#31 kcmoxtractor

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 04:21 PM

Oh now that's slick. This thread is filled with good info already :)

#32 ethnobotanica

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 04:43 PM

Funny how some threads appear syncronisticly to your thoughts at the time.
I'm planning on having a crack at turning my myco-passion into a little business as well.
Was thinking it would be great to work my way up to medicinal mush production.
Oysters would be a great starting point.
Seems to be a viable ethical business idea in the face of a seemingly doomed economy.
Also, awareness of the health benefits of gourmet fungi is definately on the rise.

Would one need a small (or large) environmentally controlled shed of some sort in order to have year long production??

I'm thinking an air-conditioner, heater, and humidifier would be needed.

#33 the_chosen_one

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 05:27 PM

Funny how some threads appear syncronisticly to your thoughts at the time.
I'm planning on having a crack at turning my myco-passion into a little business as well.
Was thinking it would be great to work my way up to medicinal mush production.
Oysters would be a great starting point.
Seems to be a viable ethical business idea in the face of a seemingly doomed economy.
Also, awareness of the health benefits of gourmet fungi is definately on the rise.

Would one need a small (or large) environmentally controlled shed of some sort in order to have year long production??

I'm thinking an air-conditioner, heater, and humidifier would be needed.


the stor-pods are great. very compact 4' x 4' x 6' tall. each one holds up to 60 small tyvek logs against three walls. i have yet to max mine out, but it could handle it.

so far i have not needed heat or a/c. a/c could be an issue as it dehumidifies. everything is.. was in the basement. a humidifier is a must. i've found a timed fog maker works well and is quite small. i use a dryer booster fan for fae (handles moist air well). i also treat the airflow with a 36 watt UV light designed for whole house systems (friggin light saber is what it is).

#34 PINKBUFFLVR

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 05:43 PM

GREAT THREAD!IM DOWN!:eusa_clap

#35 Guest_valleyofmushies_*

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 07:26 PM

i have too thought of this and want to try growing some oysters soon to get practice with them ...u know the eye for that myc...lol gotta love the smell of myc. in the morning

#36 droool

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 08:42 PM

i havent really grown anything so far so this might be a lil offtopic but is a oyster mushroom genrally a good beginners strain ( you know what i mean, a forgiving strain that lets ou experiment with the teks) ?
or would shitake be better?

ty

alex

#37 shroom57

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 11:18 PM

Oysters, particularly the warm weather strains, are reportedly quite easy to grow. They are aggressive colonizers, contaminant resistant, and thrive on a variety of substrates.

They do need a lot of FAE and enjoy elevated RH.

That, and the fact they're a wood-loving species would make them an ideal "first" grow.

#38 wildburr

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 11:56 PM

I'm starting to build a small addition onto my garage for that very reason. would love to get a small business going out of this wonderful hobby.

#39 droool

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 06:03 AM

thanks for the answer. that sunds pretty good, and as i can see they are easyily lighted with a MH 250 watt that emits 20500 lumen. which leads me to my next question: since the lamp i have has 20500 lumen but the oyster only needs 1000-1500, is that gonna damage the colony? or are oyster tolerate when it comes to light?


ty

alex

#40 ggod

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 07:07 AM

The heat from the bulb may be an issue. The amount of light needed is not much at all. Some use l.e.d.'s in their grow chamber and have good success. Not to mention the amount of electricity you would consume for the MH would be in excess of what is needed. Personally I think indirect natural lighting is the best. It is free and just as nature intended.
ggod




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