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Log for hot agar pouring....


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#1 Lazlo

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 02:40 PM

There's a thread in fungi about condensation on the lids of petris that caused me to try this. I know that the hot pouring in the open air works, but the problem is the amount of steam on the lids from the agar being so hot when poured. So, a thought came to mind. I have friends that work on the water and they use dish soap on the inside of the windows of their boats to prevent them from fogging up. Thus, I tried it with petri lids. Buffed in the soap very well until the lids were clean and clear with a paper towel. Just a drop of dish soap on it. I'm not sure if the soap will have an ill effect on the spores ability to germinate and grow out properly, but we'll see.

They are hardening now and still no condensation at all. I'll update after the inoculation as well to see the deal here....

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#2 Guest_dial8_*

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 02:51 PM

Nice idea, laz. What kind of soap is it?

#3 the_chosen_one

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 02:56 PM

Someone was asking about using Vasoline to prevent drops from forming on the inside of a grow chamber lid. I have to wonder how it would work on a petri. I guess so long as the petrolium base doesn't run down into the agar things would be fine.

#4 Elf Salvation

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 03:09 PM

Or rain X wipes, jet dry, pam spray
Just some ideaS

ELF

#5 Lazlo

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 03:10 PM

Just plain dish soap buffed into the lids well. Any kind will work. I'm inoculating in a minute and the lids are crystal clear. Cool...

#6 the_chosen_one

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 03:16 PM

Just plain dish soap buffed into the lids well. Any kind will work. I'm inoculating in a minute and the lids are crystal clear. Cool...


Yeah, something that stays fairly clear would be cool.

#7 Lazlo

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 06:19 PM

Or rain X wipes, jet dry, pam spray
Just some ideaS
ELF


Good ideas. Hmm. You know? I bet vegetable oil will work too. And I know that it doesn't have an ill effect on mushroom mycelium. Now spores, I don't know, but I don't see where it would harm germination either. I know if you add vegetable oil to your manure for spawning, the mycelium rips through it like hell....

#8 steam

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 11:25 PM

i thought most people used dishes that are sterile and sealed in sleeves. by opening them they would allow tons of contams to get in, sort of defeating the purpose. id rather have steamy lids than contamed agar.
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#9 Hippie3

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Posted 12 January 2006 - 12:10 PM

one would, of course, only open the lids under sterile conditions,
eg. in glovebox or in front of a flowhood.
the lid must come off eventually anyway so that would be the time to apply a thin layer of petroleum jelly [vasoline]
i'd use the jelly as it will adhere to the lid,
less risk of it dripping onto the agar.
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#10 Lazlo

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Posted 12 January 2006 - 12:23 PM

I think the jelly's a better idea.

What do you guys that are experienced with agar use to prevent condensation on the lids? Or, do you just say the heck with the condensation and go with it?

#11 Lazlo

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 03:59 PM

So far the soap is working great for this technique. I'm really happy, as it makes my life much easier for pouring agar. Trying to pour it cleanly while cool enough to prevent too much condensating in a cramped up gloove box can really drive me up the wall sometimes. I know, I know. Some fantastic wrapping there....lol

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#12 Lazlo

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 05:45 PM

I also figured I show you just how hot this stuff is when I pour it. Very hot indeed. Fresh out of the pressure cooker, or in my case the microwave.
Also, don't try to use a paper towel for buffing in the soap. It doesn't work well. A clean dish towel works like a charm and only takes a few seconds to buff in clearly. One tiny drop of soap, buff in, pour and allow to cool for inoculation...

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#13 xxanxx

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 06:16 PM

Great job Lazlo, I'm giving it a go pretty soon....

#14 Guest_Peter Cottontail_*

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 06:24 PM

As soon as you wipe the petri dish with a towel or rub soap on it, it is no longer sterile.

THE reason agar forms condensation on a dish lid is from pouring while too hot. Agar should be allowed to cool until it can be handled comfortably without heat protection for your hands. Leave the dishes in a vertical stack inside a glovebox until they return to room temperature, then slip back into the sleeve or wrap with parafilm. All condensation will be gone in 36 hours by following the above.
RR

#15 the_chosen_one

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 06:44 PM

I think the jelly's a better idea.
What do you guys that are experienced with agar use to prevent condensation on the lids? Or, do you just say the heck with the condensation and go with it?


Believe it or not I just leave everything open in my glove box for a few hours or so until everything cools and the moisture evaporates. If you leave the moisture in it will only pool up and cause trouble down the road unless you open it and dump it anyways. I like this idea tho Laz. Beats the hell out of leaving open petri's laying in a glove box. I'd rather just close 'em and shelve 'em. Oh yeah, that shit is hot and sticky....not a good combo. I've been burnt more than once!
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#16 agentstone

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 07:00 PM

Yessir! Condensation has always been a prob for me. I just poured 7 plates yesterday and this time I waited till the bottom of the flask containing the hot agar was ~155°F. There was ALOT less condensation from the previous times that I have poured and I know for a fact that I should have waited a bit longer for it to cool, but I was being impatient. Knowledge and patience go hang in hand in this lovely hobby.

I waited for the plates to cool then proceeded to knock um up in my ULTRA ghetto glovebox using some prints in a dish and a loop. I am currently trying to get a culture going of a wild strain that i found a few months ago. If one of those seven plates works out ok, I shall make a post and feel like superman for a short period of time. If there is 100% contam, well then boo hoo... and back to the drawing board. Hopefully it works!:eusa_pray :eusa_pray :eusa_pray :eusa_pray :eusa_pray

GO MYCOTOPIA! w00t:cacti:

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#17 Lazlo

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 07:19 PM

Plastic petri dishes don't harbor endospores. I've had these same 50 + dishes for years now and still to this day don't have bacterial problems with agar. After you're through with the dish, simply wash the dish out with soapy water and reuse. Mold spores will not survive that hot pour. That's why I do it piping hot, in the open air and then immediately wrap them after the pour.

I just simply don't enjoy pouring multiple dishes in my gloove box with cooled agar. It drives me nuts juggling dishes, spores and a jar of agar in a tight spot.

Well, i'll continue to do it this way. Very simple IMHO...
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#18 altered_states

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 09:30 AM

Plastic petri dishes don't harbor endospores. I've had these same 50 + dishes for years now and still to this day don't have bacterial problems with agar. After you're through with the dish, simply wash the dish out with soapy water and reuse. Mold spores will not survive that hot pour. That's why I do it piping hot, in the open air and then immediately wrap them after the pour.
I just simply don't enjoy pouring multiple dishes in my gloove box with cooled agar. It drives me nuts juggling dishes, spores and a jar of agar in a tight spot.
Well, i'll continue to do it this way. Very simple IMHO...


Agar that kills contaminants as opposed to growing them... Awesome.
You're definitely onto something with this, Lazlo.
I hate my glovebox as much as you do.
When I take the plunge (soon, very soon) I'm trying it this way.

Peace,
AS
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#19 PsychoactiveMessiah

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 09:46 AM

far as I know petroleum and mushies isnt a good mix causes crazy deformities. if you want to avoid condensation then stack the plates while they are warm. Warm plates keep the moisture from forming on the lids when stacked cept for the top one anyway...
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#20 PsychoactiveMessiah

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 09:49 AM

As soon as you wipe the petri dish with a towel or rub soap on it, it is no longer sterile.

THE reason agar forms condensation on a dish lid is from pouring while too hot. Agar should be allowed to cool until it can be handled comfortably without heat protection for your hands. Leave the dishes in a vertical stack inside a glovebox until they return to room temperature, then slip back into the sleeve or wrap with parafilm. All condensation will be gone in 36 hours by following the above.
RR


didnt see your post but Rodger said it best....




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