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#1 Hippie3

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 11:32 AM

curing potatoes for storage-
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Cure potatoes at a temperature of 45 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit and high relative humidity (85 to 95 percent) for two weeks. Healing of minor cuts and bruises and thickening of the skin occurs during the curing process.

Once cured, sort through the potatoes and discard any soft, shriveled, or blemished tubers. These potatoes may spoil in storage and destroy much of the crop. Potatoes should be stored at a temperature of 40 to 45 degrees Fahrenheit and relative humidity of 90 percent. Store in a dark location as potatoes turn green when exposed to light. If storage temperatures are above 45 degrees Fahrenheit, the potatoes will start to sprout after two or three months. When stored below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, potatoes develop a sugary, sweet taste. Sugary potatoes may be restored to their natural flavor by placing them at room temperature for a few days. Do not allow potatoes to freeze.

Most modern homes have few good storage places for vegetables. A cool garage or basement may be the best site. Another possibility would be a second refrigerator.



#2 weeeeeee

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 11:37 AM

helllllllllll yeah realloy diggin all this gardening recipe farming stuff hip thanks a ton

#3 Hippie3

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 11:52 AM

just sharing as i learn too.

#4 SharkieJones

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 01:21 PM

Good video Hip.

#5 rocketman

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 02:56 PM

This years garden potatos were a store bought variety i used for "seed" potatos.

The wildest thing was when the plants got a month old or so they started forming seed pods. I never have seen potato seeds and I have grown them plenty in my day. They are green with white seeds inside, almost like a tiny green tomato.

#6 Umbo

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 07:38 PM

Oh very nice, I planted my first crop of
potatoes this year, did it in straw, I figured I
have enough kickin around for oyster grows etc.
and think its a pretty cool way to do it, no dirty
potatoes and no damaged ones from digging.
Did some Laratte fingerlings, purple somethins..
not a huge fan of eating the purple ones
but they look great, some red skinned variety
and a local variety called Katahdin.
thanks Hip

#7 Hippie3

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 07:39 PM

how does one grow taters in straw ?

#8 SharkieJones

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 07:42 PM

how does one grow taters in straw ?


I would be interested in hearing about that as well.

#9 Umbo

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 08:07 PM

So there is a little good ol dirt involved
I made a bed about two inches deep,
soil/compost, pushed my seed pots in
bout half an inch, covered with 5-6"
straw. When my plants poked through
and grew up about 6" above the straw
I mulched more straw around them so
theres just the tops peaking through, Im
just going to continue mulching them up
when needed. And the taters form in the
straw, much like magic. That is if my wand
isn't broken.

A local old timer told me about it, hes been
doing it for awhile, cant wait to see how it
ends up. Googling around about it, Ive read
of people growing carrots in whole bales of
straw, pushing the seeds in and watering,
seems pretty cool.

#10 catdaddy

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 08:16 PM

I learned to grow taters from my uncle. I start the plant in a car tire full of good, loose soil- and as the plant gains height, add tires and soil until it is chest high.

The plant will fill the entire stack full of taters- then in the fall, you just kick the stack over and harvest.

You can do this anywhere- and it's a good thing- the soil here is clayey and full of small gravel.

#11 PINKBUFFLVR

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 08:41 PM

I learned to grow taters from my uncle. I start the plant in a car tire full of good, loose soil- and as the plant gains height, add tires and soil until it is chest high.

The plant will fill the entire stack full of taters- then in the fall, you just kick the stack over and harvest.

You can do this anywhere- and it's a good thing- the soil here is clayey and full of small gravel.


Thats' awsome!!:bow:Never woulda thought...:eusa_clap

#12 Oblivion

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Posted 09 July 2009 - 04:11 AM

This years garden potatos were a store bought variety i used for "seed" potatos.


That's all I do. Much cheaper that actual seed potatoes.

#13 GodofOldGodsWatching

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Posted 09 July 2009 - 09:45 AM

I learned to grow taters from my uncle. I start the plant in a car tire full of good, loose soil- and as the plant gains height, add tires and soil until it is chest high.

The plant will fill the entire stack full of taters- then in the fall, you just kick the stack over and harvest.

You can do this anywhere- and it's a good thing- the soil here is clayey and full of small gravel.

I may have to do this, cd. Sounds easy enough and I can always use some good potatoes.

#14 dead_diver

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Posted 09 July 2009 - 09:50 AM

I learned to grow taters from my uncle. I start the plant in a car tire full of good, loose soil- and as the plant gains height, add tires and soil until it is chest high.

The plant will fill the entire stack full of taters- then in the fall, you just kick the stack over and harvest.

You can do this anywhere- and it's a good thing- the soil here is clayey and full of small gravel.

Great idea! I now have a use for all the old tires littering my property. I don't have enough tires to build an earth home with but I do have enough to grow some taters with:)




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