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crabs offshore?


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#1 s0mer4ndom1diot

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 08:04 PM

to start off, when i was around 10 years old i used to catch crabs off the shore with a net, flashlight, and a bucket with my family. so i recently drove with a couple other people to visit my friend in sarasota, which is only an hour and a half away from where i live. on the 3rd day after we had gone to the beach i came up with idea to go crabbin. but since we had already stayed 3 days, we couldnt stay any longer. so the plan is to go crabbin the next time we go down there, which should be about a month or so. i want to have a recipe ready for when we go. my question is, since i want to get a recipe for that certain type type of crab, what type of crabs are these that you can catch offshore? ive been searching the internet but cant seem to find an answer. any help guys?

#2 Hippie3

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 08:10 PM

we caught bushels of blue crab
on raw chicken necks tied on a string-
throw in, pull out very slowly- crabs will follow bait
into shallows where you can net / catch them.

#3 s0mer4ndom1diot

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 08:22 PM

aha! that must be it, thx hip! :amazed:
i bought my net too today, it was only about 3 foot long tho
so i went to home depot and bought some pvc pipe and used waterpoof
epoxy to glue the 2 ends together
lol, when i finished making it i was playing around with/testing it in the driveway by pretending to scoop up crabs and swirling it around in the air
i got some weird looks by people driving by... lol
so now i need to do some research on times to go and most importanty RECIPES!

#4 catdaddy

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 08:46 PM

Used to catch blues just like that at Murrel's Inlet, SC- I bet other members have, too.

Edited by chimp, 22 July 2009 - 10:57 AM.


#5 Hippie3

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 08:46 PM

CRAB CREOLE

Ingredients:
2/3 cup chopped onions
4 green onions
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons margarine
1/2 cup chopped green pepper
1/2 cup chopped celery
1 cup water
1/4 teaspoon red pepper
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1½ teaspoons garlic powder
2 teaspoons sugar
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon basil
1 16-ounce can chopped tomatoes
1 8-ounce can tomato sauce
1 cup Louisiana crabmeat

Chef: Jonathan Hawley
Serves: 6
In a 2-quart saucepan, sauté onions in vegetable oil on low heat until tender. Add margarine, green pepper and celery and cook 5 minutes on low heat. Add water and seasonings, simmer 20 minutes. Add tomatoes, tomato sauce and crabmeat; simmer 10 minutes



#6 Hippie3

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 08:49 PM

SEAFOOD GUMBO


Seafood gumbo. It ain't a recipe, it's dozens, if not hundreds, of recipes. There are so many different ways to make this dish, and it is made in so many different ways by so many Louisiana cooks and chefs, that it's almost futile to list one recipe here. I'm going to list a few, but please by no means think these are definitive. They're good gumbos, and good places to start off. As you learn more about Creole cuisine, feel free to experiment with different combinations of seafood, roux or no roux, filé or no filé, okra or no okra, tomatoes or no tomatoes (I don't like tomatoes in my gumbo, me ... but lots of Louisianians do). Just remember ... you CANNOT have a good seafood gumbo without a good seafood stock. Don't use water, and don't use bottled clam juice. Remember to use a non-reactive (non-cast iron) pot for any gumbo (or any dish, for that matter) that includes okra or tomatoes, as they will discolor.
These recipes can be cut in half if you don't want to feed an army.
Do NOT under any circumstances use imitation crabmeat, or surimi, in any crab gumbo dishes. If you tried that in Louisiana, you'd be shot on sight. If you try it elsewhere ... I'll know. And I'll come into your dreams and haunt you and you'll be slowly devoured by dull-toothed alligators.
This gumbo uses a very small amount of roux, so that it remains light. You may omit the okra if you like, and thicken the gumbo with filé powder instead -- it'll still be good, but will have a quite different flavor.


  • 1/2 cup oil
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 2 medium onions, diced
  • 2 green bell peppers, diced
  • 3 ribs celery, finely diced
  • 4-6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 tomatoes (or 8 Roma tomatoes), seeded and diced (if you like tomatoes in your gumbo)
  • 1 cup tomato purée (see above)
  • 2 pounds okra, chopped
  • 4 quarts shrimp stock, crab stock or fish stock
  • 1 tablespoon Creole seasoning blend
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
  • 2 bay leaves
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 2 pounds medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 2 dozen oysters, freshly shucked, liquor reserved
  • 4 blue crabs, cleaned (optional)
  • 1 pound fresh lump crabmeat, picked over for shells and cartilage
  • 1 tablespoon filé powder (if okra isn't used)
  • 8 cups cooked long-grain white rice
In a large, heavy pot, heat the oil and add the flour. Stir constantly until a light brown roux is formed, then add the onions, bell pepper, celery and garlic. Sauté until the onions become translucent and the vegetables are tender. Add the tomatoes and tomato purée, if you wish, and cook over medium heat for 10 minutes. (I know I sound like a broken record, but I'm not one of those people who likes tomatoes in my gumbo, but lots of people do. Your mileage may vary.) Add the seasonings, and about 1/2 teaspoon each of salt and pepper, and continue to cook another 10 minutes. Add the okra, and cook for another 10 minutes, then add the stock. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to simmer and cook another 30 minutes.
(If you wish a more rustic gumbo, you may add whole blue crabs. Remove the hard top shell from the crabs (reserving for stuffed crabs or for shellfish stock), and break each crab in two down the middle. Remove the claws. Add to the stock.) With the gumbo on very low heat, add the shrimp 10 minutes before serving, the oysters and oyster liquor 5 minutes before serving, and the crabmeat just before serving (don't cook the crabmeat, just stir until it is heated through). Taste and correct seasonings.
If you don't like okra, or if you just prefer to make a filé gumbo, remove from heat and sprinkle the filé powder on the surface of the gumbo, then cover and let stand for 15 minutes. Then uncover and stir to mix. Be careful if there are leftovers -- filé doesn't reheat all that well, and you must be careful to reheat gently. If the gumbo comes back to a boil after the filé has been added, it will get stringy.
Place about 1/2 to 2/3 cup of rice in each bowl and ladle the gumbo over and around it. Serve with plenty of french bread and good beer or white wine.
YIELD: About 10-12 entrée servings or 20-24 appetizer servings (omit hard shell crabs if serving cups of gumbo as an appetizer)



#7 s0mer4ndom1diot

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 09:14 PM

:puke: ooooo! im REALLY hungry now. TO THE KITCHEN! thanks for the recipes too. the seafood gumbo one sounds delish!

#8 Hippie3

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 09:23 PM

Filé Gumbo Recipe
1/2 Cup Vegetable Oil
3/4 Cup All Purpose Flour
4 Tbsp Creole Seasoning
1 Cup Onions, diced
1/2 Cup Green Bell Pepper, diced
1/2 Cup Celery, diced
1 Cup Andouille, sliced or diced
1/2 Cup Tasso, diced
3 Tbsp Garlic, chopped
8 Cups Shrimp or Seafood Stock
3 Fresh Bay Leaves
4 Chicken Thighs, boned cut into 1″ pieces, then seasoned liberally with Creole Seasoning
2 Tbsp Worcestershire Sauce
Hot Sauce to taste
1 lb. Fresh Shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 Dozen Oysters, shucked
Kosher Salt to taste, if necessary
2 Tbsp Italian Parsley, chopped
1/4 Cup Thinly Sliced Green Onions
Creole Boiled Rice
Fresh French Bread
Filé Powder at the table
Mix your onion, celery, and bell pepper together: The Holy Trinity.
Heat the oil in a cast iron dutch oven over medium heat. Whisk in the flour and cook to make a milk chocolate Roux (making a Roux). Add the Andouille, 1 Tbsp of Seasoning, and 3/4 of the Holy Trinity, cook, stirring often, for about ten minutes or until the vegetables soften. Gradually whisk in the stock, then add the remaining seasoning, and Garlic. Bring to a Boil, then down to a simmer for at least 2 hours, stirring occasionally. Add the chicken and simmer until cooked through. About 10 minutes before you’re ready to serve add the shrimp, cook until done, then add the oysters and cook until the edges curl. Add the Worcestershire, Hot Sauce, and 1/2 of the Green Onions. Serve with Creole Boiled Rice, crusty French Bread, and a good cold beer (I like Dixie or Abita Amber).
Garnish with green onions, parsley, and Filé powder at the table.
* I prefer Chicken Thighs for my soups and Gumbos. It’s the misunderstood portion of the bird, which is fine by me because it keeps the price down. I get them bone in, then Cartel wrap the bones and stick them in the freezer for stock. I’m like a Vulture when it comes to bones for stocks, my freezer looks like the Catacombs (animals only of course).
This makes about 3-4 Main Course Serving



#9 TastyBeverage

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 10:44 PM

One of my family's traditional holiday dishes is crab stir fried with sliced ginger, scallions and garlic. I think my mom adds a bit of curry powder too. Yummy! And super simple.

#10 Hippie3

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Posted 22 July 2009 - 07:07 AM

xnKOVPXhlnE

#11 ggod

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 03:10 PM

aha! that must be it, thx hip! :amazed:
i bought my net too today, it was only about 3 foot long tho
so i went to home depot and bought some pvc pipe and used waterpoof
epoxy to glue the 2 ends together
lol, when i finished making it i was playing around with/testing it in the driveway by pretending to scoop up crabs and swirling it around in the air
i got some weird looks by people driving by... lol
so now i need to do some research on times to go and most importanty RECIPES!



Google casting nets. I throw one to catch bait, They can be used for crabs and shrimp as well. you would be surprised at all the different types of fish you can get with them. Check the local laws before using them. I would not want to see you get a ticket.

#12 slummunky

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 03:17 PM

Eagle Claw make crab trap net, they are around 3 to 5 dollars just tie a chicken neck in the middle and throw it in!! They will come runnin!

#13 slummunky

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 03:22 PM

Here's what they look like you cand find them in any bait shop around the coast.
http://www.thecharle.../C34/f2211.html

#14 wildburr

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 03:23 PM

Man I'm hungry as hell now. Nice recipe's Hip :bow:

#15 s0mer4ndom1diot

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 02:04 PM

well my crab hunt turned out to be highy unsucessful
didnt see one crab!
i also broke my cheap net trying to scoop up string rays...
well the red arrow is where i use to go on vacation with my
parents and occasionally crabbing (which was loaded)
the blue arrow is where i tried to go yesterday
so i did my research before i went, found its
best to go out at low tide
found out low tide at st. pete for that day is midnight
i figured since each is on either side of the bay,
both should be loaded with crabs
boy was i wrong...
so looks like i need to do ALOT more research and buy a new net :mistrust:

edit: forgot to say this map is of the west coast of florida

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#16 Lazlo

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 02:29 PM

We went chicken neckin' down at my aunt's property 2 weekends ago and caught 2 1/2 dozen crabs in about 3 hours. These are no ordinary crabs. Her property is on a river that is renowned for monster crabs. Every one of them were over 6 inches. There were 11 crabs in the traps as well, but my uncle would've killed me for taking them. The sea nettles were flat out horrendous, so we were lucky to catch that many. 20 years ago you could easily catch 2-4 bushels of crabs in a day just chicken neckin' off the dock in the summer. But you'd be hard pressed to catch a halfer these days. We're going back down there after a really good rain so the nettles get lost. I'll take some photos of the these doggies for you guys, since there's interest here. You'll shit when you see these doggies! A long time ago I caught 2 back to back in the same spot over 8 inches! That is no b.s.

#17 Lazlo

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 02:48 PM

well my crab hunt turned out to be highy unsucessful
didnt see one crab!
i also broke my cheap net trying to scoop up string rays...
well the red arrow is where i use to go on vacation with my
parents and occasionally crabbing (which was loaded)
the blue arrow is where i tried to go yesterday
so i did my research before i went, found its
best to go out at low tide
found out low tide at st. pete for that day is midnight
i figured since each is on either side of the bay,
both should be loaded with crabs
boy was i wrong...
so looks like i need to do ALOT more research and buy a new net :mistrust:
edit: forgot to say this map is of the west coast of florida


I would try to get up in a creek somewhere. And don't feel stupid by asking a bait shop how to catch some crabs. Someone will put you on the crabs, if you ask.

#18 Hippie3

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 02:53 PM

We went chicken neckin' down at my aunt's property 2 weekends ago and caught 2 1/2 dozen crabs in about 3 hours. These are no ordinary crabs. Her property is on a river that is renowned for monster crabs. Every one of them were over 6 inches. There were 11 crabs in the traps as well, but my uncle would've killed me for taking them. The sea nettles were flat out horrendous, so we were lucky to catch that many. 20 years ago you could easily catch 2-4 bushels of crabs in a day just chicken neckin' off the dock in the summer. But you'd be hard pressed to catch a halfer these days. We're going back down there after a really good rain so the nettles get lost. I'll take some photos of the these doggies for you guys, since there's interest here. You'll shit when you see these doggies! A long time ago I caught 2 back to back in the same spot over 8 inches! That is no b.s.

when i was a little boy, circa 1965, we went to south coast of texas
and caught a couple bushels of blue crabs in about an hour or so.

#19 huntsman

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 05:37 PM

Excellent Hank tune, Hip.
Thanks for posting it!

#20 thatgreenthumb

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 11:50 PM

Me and a few friends are going out to Lake Pontchartrain to catch a nice meal this weekend. We use the necks on a string and as soon as they are thrown out we can pull them in. We fill up a large ice chest in very little time. often more than one crab on the line every time they are pulled in.




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