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pasteurizing straw/poo


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#21 Hippie3

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 09:07 PM

how long has it been since spawning with no growth ?
what is the temperature ?

#22 Hippie3

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 09:08 PM

ck this out-
Mycotopia Web Archive: Horse poo tek pictorial grow log *COMPLETED* by roadkill

#23 chill

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 09:36 PM

Moisture content is really important. The straw/poo should only drip a little water when squeezed after pasteurization and prior to spawning.

Also, if you are using store bought steer manure consider using over steralization so that it doesn't clump up in a bit wet mass.

Ratios important. I use 1 part pf cake to 4 parts bulk substrate.

You can try colonizing in clear plastic so you can see the progress. If the mycelium spawn is turning grey then your moisture content may be too high.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

#24 tempest2003

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 11:02 PM

oh i have lots of spawn, half gallon of rye per tray is what ill be using. and ill be doin 8 trays at a time so it will be a lot of work, and a lot of straw/poo, just wanna make sure i get it right, i still cant find any pics on a solid looking straw/poo tek.
PS: thanks for the poo tek hipp that gives me a start

#25 Guest_freakachino_*

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 08:33 AM

I usually just loop my pillow case through my fence outside for a few hours after past. My Straw too. This helps it cool and drain. While it does its thing, I clean and get all my materials set up and ready for when I bring it in. I like to put my spawn in my tray first, then add my manure/straw and mix. I also like to leave about 1/4 of my spawn to sprinkle on the very top of the mix. I find this helps colonize the top really quickly and ward off contams because that mycelium can really take over the top. I then cover with saran, poke holes all around with clean needle, then lightly cover with foil. I leave mine at room temp to colonize, but you can incubate it too for faster growth. When I first started with bulk I started small so I could get a feel for using it. Hope this helps some.

#26 reverend trips

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Posted 21 May 2005 - 09:51 AM

anyone know how may btu's you would need to get a 45 gallon drum half full of water up to pasteurizing temp?
also if anyone knows where one would look for a propane burner that would achieve this.
thanks!

#27 Guest_Peter Cottontail_*

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Posted 21 May 2005 - 12:55 PM

http://www.thegrills...com/burners.asp
RR

#28 altered_states

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Posted 21 May 2005 - 01:26 PM

I hear that brew supply stores sell them... No shipping charges.
I also hear that a 90,000 BTU propane burner can boil 5 Gallons of cold water on a windy day in less time than it takes to smoke a cigarette.
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#29 reverend trips

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Posted 21 May 2005 - 01:49 PM

Thanks guys!

#30 tempest2003

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Posted 21 May 2005 - 09:35 PM

bump for goodluck

#31 Lazlo

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Posted 21 May 2005 - 11:47 PM

Good luck man! Just remember when trying to colonize any substrates that the moisture content needs to be field capacity. Any added moisture will be perfect breeding ground for bacteria, hence slowing your work considerably. Even stopping colonization of mushroom mycelium. Don't be affraid to use some hydrated lime also. That shit's a saviour for colonizing straw cleanly.

#32 Guest_freakachino_*

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Posted 22 May 2005 - 07:51 AM

I also think its important to use as much spawn as you can comparatively. The ratio of spawn to the ratio of the manure/straw means a lot. If I am spawning 1 half pint pf jar, I use 2-3 handfuls of manure. This makes a decent size casing and hey its just 1 half pint. I measure by the handfuls now. I know it takes me 5-6 handfuls to fill the grain jars, so I do between 7-9 handfuls of manure to spawn a quart jar to. Sometimes I even just eyeball it.

Hydrated lime makes all the difference I think too. And lately I have been noticing the more I use the more the mycelium likes it.

Give it at least 10 days tempest to see if there is any change or growth. Did you poke holes so it can breath? I find the more holes I poke in the cover the quicker it colonizes. I try not to check on them at all till day 3. Hope it colonizes for you. My first time it took between 10-14 days to get my manure colonized.

#33 altered_states

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Posted 22 May 2005 - 12:39 PM

I'm a big fan of chemical warfare.
Lime the hell out of it.

You will be very surprised when you see how much lime the mycelium can tolerate.
I like to sprinkle lime onto the substrate while filling a pillowcase before pasteurization.
Just makes sense, as opposed to adding lime to the water.
More lime has had a direct correlation to my declining rate of failure.

After pasteurization and draining
Squeeze the water out handful by handful, like Lazlo said.
After squeezing the water out, the substrate is no longer wet;
It is MOIST.
If it's wet, it's doomed.
Just squeeze out as much as water as you can by making a tight fist.
You can't squeeze out moisture, only water.
The squeeze of a human hand does a remarkable job at accurately achieving field capacity.

Best of luck,
AS

#34 Guest_Peter Cottontail_*

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Posted 22 May 2005 - 02:19 PM

Sorry, but I can't recommend squeezing the water out of straw. The advantage to straw is the hollow stems hold water, which is available after full colonization to support the flush. Proper moisture content for straw is obtained by simply allowing it to drain on its own after pasteruization for an hour or two until cool.

If you're using horse manure, a 50/50 mix might work, but if it's the composted cow manure out of a bag from a garden center, it's too dense to work with straw in that concentration. Barely add enough manure to get the straw dirty. I've had the best luck with that type of manure by mixing with coir and verm to lighten it up, then bring to field capacity, and pasteurize in quart jars in a large pot of hot water. Field capacity the way I (and stamets) use it means to take a handful and hold it loosely. No water should drip out by gravity. Give it a gentle squeeze, and a few drops should trickle out. Give it a much harder squeeze, and a gentle stream should flow out. Mix this manure with the straw as you build your bin. As said above, use 10% or less manure and 90% straw.
RR

#35 tempest2003

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Posted 23 May 2005 - 11:21 AM

im using real home grown poo., no baged shit

#36 Ali

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Posted 23 May 2005 - 11:44 AM

NM. Thread jack.

#37 highflyer

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 01:26 AM

I agree with Rodger. You should not have to squeeze straw as it should already be drained to the proper point. The only time you should ring out the substrate is if you are using field manure as it will retain too much moisture most of the time. Although Id suggest a larger poo:straw ratio than he did if you arent using bagged manure.

Here is my favorite straw/poo pictoral. Its not really a tek, but that method works well.
Mycotopia Web Archive: Archive through November 01, 2003
Placed the straw and the manure into a pillowcase. Let soak with bleach and lime for 24 hrs. Then heat at 160 for 1 hour.

#38 altered_states

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 02:40 AM

Sorry, but I can't recommend squeezing the water out of straw. The advantage to straw is the hollow stems hold water, which is available after full colonization to support the flush. Proper moisture content for straw is obtained by simply allowing it to drain on its own after pasteruization for an hour or two until cool.

If you're using horse manure, a 50/50 mix might work, but if it's the composted cow manure out of a bag from a garden center, it's too dense to work with straw in that concentration. Barely add enough manure to get the straw dirty. I've had the best luck with that type of manure by mixing with coir and verm to lighten it up, then bring to field capacity, and pasteurize in quart jars in a large pot of hot water. Field capacity the way I (and stamets) use it means to take a handful and hold it loosely. No water should drip out by gravity. Give it a gentle squeeze, and a few drops should trickle out. Give it a much harder squeeze, and a gentle stream should flow out. Mix this manure with the straw as you build your bin. As said above, use 10% or less manure and 90% straw.
RR



Oh yeah.... Straw, forgot all about it.
I have horse shit on the brain.

For straw I use Rodger's TEK verbatim.

Horse manure at the bottom of a pillowcase needs water squeezed out prior to spawning, even after hanging to dry for 2 days.
Just squeezing the full pillowcase won't cut it.

CUT YOUR STRAW INTO 1"-3" PIECES.
DON'T SLACK OFF!!!!!!!!

I'm going to fall asleep momentarily.
peace
AS

#39 funguess

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 09:31 AM

When pasteurizing straw and manure should the two be combined together then pasteurized or do they need to be seperate for some reason. Also, should the straw or poo be soaked a day before pasteurizing and are the paseurization methods/times for both straw and poo the same? thanks

#40 Guest_freakachino_*

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 06:02 PM

I don't do poo/straw mixed substrates. But if I were to do it, then I'd soak my straw for at least 12 hours. This will hydrate the straw prior to pastuerizing it. Straw will dry out if it isn't properly hydrated prior to use. Then I'd say it could be added to the manure for past. I never hydrate my manure before past. Just crumble it well, and stick it in a pillowcase, and past. with temps. 140-160, for 2 hours.

Straw, I have found doesn't need as high of temps for past. as manure. In fact there is a no heat straw past. using bleach and lime here:
http://mycotopia.net...eat Bleach lime

If you are going to do a mix, I'd suggest (just a suggestion, and wait for more from others also)
Soaking the straw for 12 hours or overnight. I'd do a bleach/lime soak for it.
Drain it.
Add to the manure in the pillowcase (or whatever you're using to past.)
Then past. at 140-160 degrees for 2 hours adding a bit of lime to the past. water. I find temps at about 150 work best for me.
Then drain it well. Sometimes you have to squeeze the extra water out.




Hope this helps you some.




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