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#1 Guest_pissybee_*

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Posted 30 October 2003 - 09:00 PM

Thought this was interesting, so I figured some of you might, too.
PB

NORML E-Zine
Volume 6
Issue 42
October 30, 2003

The NORML E-Zine is a free weekly compilation of major news items
regarding marijuana policy. Text of archived stories is available on
NORML's website at:
http://www.norml.org...m?Group_ID=3442

Help NORML free Tommy Chong and others like him from repressive
anti-paraphernalia laws. Get your Free Tommy shirt today and save $5 on
any purchase of $35 or more! Coupon Code: NORMLSALE HURRY! Coupon
expires 10/31/2003
http://www.cafeshops.com/norml

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https://banqa.uaqa.c...oin/pledge.html

####################
TOP STORIES


* British MPs Vote To Ease Pot Possession Laws
* NORML Encourages Jamaican Parliament To Adopt Marijuana
Decriminalization
* Pot Constituents Offer Novel Approach To Anti-Cancer Therapy

____________________________________________
British MPs Vote To Ease Pot Possession Laws
Impending Policy Is Similar To That Of 12 U.S. States Which No Longer Jail
Minor Marijuana Offenders
London, United Kingdom: Members of Parliament voted this week 316 to
160 to downgrade marijuana from a Class B to a Class C scheduled drug so
that its possession is no longer an arrestable offense under British law.
The legal change, initially announced by Home Secretary David Blunkett two
years ago, is expected to be implemented next January.
Under the pending legal change, individuals found in possession of
"personal use" amounts of marijuana will be cautioned by police, but no
longer arrested. (Police will retain the discretion to make an arrest
under special "aggravated" circumstances, such as if marijuana is smoked
on school grounds.)
NORML Executive Director Keith Stroup praised the vote. "Neither the
marijuana user nor the drug itself presents a legitimate danger to public
safety to warrant criminal classification," he said.
Presently, about 80,000 Britons are arrested annually for possessing
cannabis.
Class C is the least harmful category of illegal drugs under British
law. Although possession of Class C drugs technically carries a two-year
maximum prison term, only offenses punishable by at least five years
imprisonment are arrestable in England. However, those caught supplying
Class C drugs, including cannabis, may be subject to as many as 14 years
in jail.
Last year, the British House of Commons and Parliament's Advisory
Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) both released reports recommending
marijuana possession be downgraded to a non-arrestable offense. In recent
years, several European nations - including Belgium, Croatia, Portugal and
Luxembourg - have decriminalized the use and possession of marijuana.
Earlier this month, French Prime Minister Jean Pierre Raffarin also
announced plans to downgrade marijuana possession in France to a fine-only
offense.
England's impending policy will be similar to the laws in 12 US states
where the possession and use of small amounts of marijuana is no longer
punishable by criminal arrests and/or jail time.
For more information, please contact either Keith Stroup or Paul
Armentano of NORML at (202) 483-5500.

__________________________________________________ _______________________
NORML Encourages Jamaican Parliament To Adopt Marijuana Decriminalization
Washington, DC: NORML submitted written testimony this week in
response to a Jamaican Joint Select Committee's request for public
comments regarding the findings of a 2001 federally commissioned report
endorsing the decriminalization of marijuana.
"Responsible adult marijuana smokers present no legitimate threat or
danger to society, and must not be treated as criminals," NORML wrote.
"By stubbornly defining all marijuana smoking as criminal, including that
which involves adults smoking within the privacy of their own homes,
Jamaica is wasting precious police and prosecutorial resources; clogging
the courts; filling costly and scarce jail and prison space that would
otherwise house violent offenders; undermining drug education efforts;
acting against the best interests of public health and safety; engendering
disrespect for the rule of law; and needlessly wrecking the lives and
careers of tens of thousands of otherwise law-abiding citizens every
year."
Government commissioned reports in the United States, Great Britain,
Canada, Australia, New Zealand and elsewhere have all recommended
decriminalizing marijuana for recreational purposes. The Jamaican
National Commission on Ganja concluded: "The criminal status of ganja
poses a serious danger to society. By alienating and criminalising
hundreds of thousands of otherwise law-abiding citizens, and by making the
State in their view an instrument of their oppression rather than their
protection, the law and its prosecution create in them disrespect for the
rule of law."
The Commission recommended that Parliament amend federal law to
decriminalize "small quantities" of marijuana for "personal use by adults"
and also for "religious purposes."
NORML Executive Director Keith Stroup said, "It is our hope that
Parliament approaches this issue as thoughtfully and as diligently as did
the Commission, and adopts their recommendation to decriminalize the
responsible use of marijuana by adults."
For more information, please contact either Keith Stroup or Paul
Armentano of NORML at (202) 483-5500. Text of NORML's testimony is
available online at: http://www.norml.org...m?Group_ID=5801.

__________________________________________________ ___________
Pot Constituents Offer Novel Approach To Anti-Cancer Therapy,
Medical Journal Says
Madrid, Spain: Cannabinoids' palliative effects in cancer patients
and ability to inhibit the growth of certain types of malignant tumors
make them a potentially desirable agents in the treatment of cancer,
according to a clinical review published in this month's issue of the
journal, Nature Reviews Cancer.
Cannabinoids prevent nausea, vomiting and pain in cancer patients, as
well as stimulate appetite, the author writes. Furthermore, "cannabinoids
are usually well tolerated, and do not produce the generalized toxic
effects of conventional chemotherapies. ... In addition, these compounds
have been shown to inhibit the growth of tumor cells in culture and animal
models."
The author concludes that further pre-clinical research into
marijuana's anti-cancer properties is required, and that "it would be
desirable that clinical trials could accompany these laboratory studies to
allow [for the] use [of] these compounds in the treatment of cancer."
Studies published earlier this year demonstrated that marijuana and
its derivatives induce tumor regression in rodents, including the
inhibition of malignant gliomas (brain tumors) and skin cancer.
For more information, please contact either Allen St. Pierre or Paul
Armentano of The NORML Foundation at (202) 483-8751. Full text of the
study, entitled "Cannabinoids: potential anticancer agents," is available
in the October 2003 issue of the journal Nature Reviews Cancer.


#2 Guest_alligator_*

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Posted 01 November 2003 - 08:43 AM

“Once a government is committed to the principle of silencing the voice of opposition, it has only one way to go, and that is down the path of increasingly repressive measures, until it becomes a source of terror to all its citizens and creates a country where everyone lives in fear.” — Harry S. Truman



#3 imok

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Posted 01 November 2003 - 12:46 PM

Hey Hip, what do you think about putting a banner to
Normal on our links page Posted Image

#4 Guest_hippie3_*

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Posted 01 November 2003 - 02:35 PM

proly a good idea

#5 BrownLeaf

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 11:00 AM

Last year, the British House of Commons and Parliament's Advisory
Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) both released reports recommending
marijuana possession be downgraded to a non-arrestable offense. In recent
years, several European nations - including Belgium, Croatia, Portugal and
Luxembourg - have decriminalized the use and possession of marijuana.


That is wrong. Croatian law does not make any difference between marijuana and heroin or cocaine.

Court practice is to punish you with money fine if you first time cough in possession of marijuana. Second time u have big chance for up to 1 year in prison.
If u grow or sell - 3 years prison minimum.

#6 August West

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 11:12 AM

That is wrong. Croatian law does not make any difference between marijuana and heroin or cocaine.

Court practice is to punish you with money fine if you first time cough in possession of marijuana. Second time u have big chance for up to 1 year in prison.
If u grow or sell - 3 years prison minimum.


this thread is 7 years old. Maybe the law changed?

#7 BrownLeaf

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 11:19 AM

that law is actual right now




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