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#1 muffy

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 07:59 AM

So, I'll be signing papers on my own house today!!!!
Currently there is electric heat, and propane.
I'd like to do away with both possibly,
and install a wood stove or pellet stove.

I'd like a woodstove because:
- I have over 300+ acres of land to scour for wood.
- I don't mind chopping/splitting/stacking


I'd like a pellet stove because:
- Direct Vent through the wall, I have a deck that would be in the way of my stove pipe chimney.
- Pellets around 240$/ton, should last most of winter


I'll be heating approx 900sqft, and to me it is not an option to keep the electric heat.
The price difference between a wood stove and a pellet stove is minimal upon completion to my understanding.

Any DIY'ers play with fire?
- I could use some/any tips/advice, as this will be my first install.

#2 AmBe

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 08:33 AM

i would go with the wood stove so you don't have to leave the property to get more fuel.

#3 Oblivion

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 09:13 AM

Firstly, congrats on such a fine spread man. 300 acre is one hell of a playground. I have electric(geothermal) and a wood burning fireplace that heats a 2400 sq ft home up to 80 or so in the dead of winter. I split wood just about every weekend and its good honest work that I enjoy. If it were me, I would get a stove that's capable of burning split logs, those come free(with 300 acre) and you may have to rely on that price one day.

#4 TVCasualty

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 09:23 AM

I like catalytic wood stoves, the kind that re-burn the smoke just like a catalytic converter does in your car. They're a lot more efficient and give you more heat longer with less wood than larger non-catalytic wood stoves. Costs more, but using less fuel= less time & labor so longer-term savings can be had.

The outdoor type wood burners are nice too, and a lot safer since the heat is piped into your house and run through a heat exchanger while the fire stays in the shed outside. I've seen one of those plumbed to be a house/water heater that re-circulated hot water to keep the house warm that also fed the hot water faucets.

Then there's solar-thermal; good for heating the whole house plus the water or just your water, and a complete system can be had for a few thousand with a 5-7 year payback (and no chopping/splitting/hauling).

#5 rocketman

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 09:33 AM

I love wood stoves and wood fireplaces. I had been in houses with blowers on the fireplaces and it was super warm, hot actually. Its harder to control temps with wood, and its dirty. I never heated with wood for extended periods of time, but its nice on occasion to have a wood fire.



I think some kerosene heaters would be great for individual rooms, or just get a couple of good ones and move them around.


You want at least 2 forms of heat in case one goes down. I thought I had it figured out until we had a terrible ice storm one year that knocked out power for a couple of days. I had a nice natural gas fp and figured with the ceiling fan circulating the heat would be perfect.......flick flick......ah fuck, yeah i was a dumbass.


edited to say: Congrats on the new digs Muff!

#6 TVCasualty

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 09:50 AM

I love wood stoves and wood fireplaces. I had been in houses with blowers on the fireplaces and it was super warm, hot actually. Its harder to control temps with wood, and its dirty


Ah yes, a cleaner house was another advantage of the outdoor stove option. Plus, you could regulate the heat very precisely with valves on the water lines to the heat exchanger.

I think some kerosene heaters would be great for individual rooms, or just get a couple of good ones and move them around.


I've used those a lot, and my gf and I woke up nearly dead from CO poisoning one night since we drifted off to sleep without shutting it off (had a window cracked and everything, but not cracked enough I guess).

I woke up almost in a tripping delirium, feeling as out of it as descriptions of date-rape drugs I've read, and my thoughts were in super slow motion; "must...shut...off...heater...or...I...will...die" and I fumbled around with the big red Off button because my fine motor skills were completely gone and I couldn't even stand up. With the heater off and the window opened, I felt back to normal in two minutes. Close call. Use kerosene with extreme caution; as for me I won't use it at all anymore.

#7 Burger

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 10:27 AM

I have heated with wood for as long as i can remember, and love the heat it provides during the colder months. It can't be beat imo, and is also a great way to offset electricity bills. ;)

Which ever heat source you decide on muffy, be sure to maximise efficiency by ensuring your new house is well insulated.

Congrats on the new pad. :headbang:

#8 muffy

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 12:06 PM

thanks guys,
I'm stoked.. I'll own that bitch come 2pm :D

My problem with the woodstove,
is that there is a deck that overhangs where the exterior chimney would be,
but I believe that is what I really want.
The house is less than 900 sq,
and some of the stoves I've been eyeball fucking
are rated for 1500+sq and burn 8hrs per log...
so with a blower and a vent in the floor above,
I think that would be bitchin.

I use to live on a farm,
that had (still has) an exterior wood furnace,
it heated like 4 apartments,
and 2 of the farm houses.
I think they are kick ass,
but too big for my small house.

#9 bugs

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 12:54 PM

Wood's great. We used to have an oil fha system with a wood furnace on the same plenum.
The my back went to hell. Still miss the wood, though.

A nice catalytic stove and a ceiling fan will do a hell of a job.

If I had my druthers I'd have a masonry, or Russian, stove. A couple of hot burns a day and you're good. Nice, even heat.

Better for softwood, scrap etc. than an airtight. It increases your fuel options. But big, expensive unless you do a lot of research and build it yourself.

#10 touchfaith

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 01:24 PM

It's cool to hear someone utilizing the knowledge we have today for a safer, cheaper source of heat.

Thank you :bow:.

I don't mean to pry but I thought just one acre of land cost a large bundle, let a lone three hundred! Are you by any chance Rupert Murdoch?

epmurdoch.jpg

#11 TastyBeverage

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 05:18 PM

That depends on where the land is. The US government is still giving away free parcels in alaska. :)

#12 touchfaith

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 05:28 PM

That depends on where the land is. The US government is still giving away free parcels in alaska. :)

I think I better get in on the action, it's been my dream ever since I was a young lad to have a huge portion of property to call my own (disregarding my general beliefs that no one can actually own land). Life might be getting very interesting soon :rasta:.

By the way, there is no point to the smokin' Rastafarian I just posted up there, it just seemed right.

#13 growurown

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 06:26 PM

here is a plan to turn a old water heater into a woodburner. You can do it for free (assuming some jerk doesnt charge you for the dead waterheater)if you can weld if i remeber right.

http://www.off-grid....ee-wood-burner/

#14 Hippie3

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 06:35 PM

That depends on where the land is. The US government is still giving away free parcels in alaska. :)

um, better read the fine print,
not simple nor easy
and most likely no road within many miles,
everything flown in or out.
then there's the weather...

#15 heritage ranch

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 07:26 PM

So, I'll be signing papers on my own house today!!!!
Currently there is electric heat, and propane.
I'd like to do away with both possibly,
and install a wood stove or pellet stove.

I'd like a woodstove because:
- I have over 300+ acres of land to scour for wood.
- I don't mind chopping/splitting/stacking


I'd like a pellet stove because:
- Direct Vent through the wall, I have a deck that would be in the way of my stove pipe chimney.
- Pellets around 240$/ton, should last most of winter


I'll be heating approx 900sqft, and to me it is not an option to keep the electric heat.
The price difference between a wood stove and a pellet stove is minimal upon completion to my understanding.

Any DIY'ers play with fire?
- I could use some/any tips/advice, as this will be my first install.


i would build a "rocket mass heater" these are very efficient, both from a monetary and enviromental standpoint. they are easy to adjust the stovepipe location and can be very beautiful if crafted well

one thing i like about a pellet stove is that it runns on a thermostat and can be ignored except for occasional feeding. the rocket mass stove makes up for this with all the mass so you dont have to feed it often

#16 TastyBeverage

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 07:39 PM

um, better read the fine print,
not simple nor easy
and most likely no road within many miles,
everything flown in or out.
then there's the weather...



I didn't mean to imply that it was highly desirable land, quite the opposite. That's why there are still parcels available.

#17 bugs

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 09:17 PM

Just had a thought -yeah, it happens sometimes- about some articles in Mother Earth News years ago.

There were construction articles for a waste oil burner. If I remember right, waste oul you'd get free from garages would drip slowly into a heated pan, vaporize and combust. Don't recall the details, but it seems there were/are commercial versions.

Yup, found it. http://journeytofore...rearth/me4.html

Googled waste oil burner plans. There are a bunch.

Edited by bugs, 18 December 2009 - 09:20 PM.
Found it!


#18 mushit

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 09:39 PM

Hee Hee. Tried to make my own waste oil burner in the early eighties. Almost blew the whole kit and kaboodle up! Learned me a good lesson there. Oil burns slow when it is cold.

Congrats on the acreage, Muffy.

What stove did you decide upon?

#19 muffy

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Posted 19 December 2009 - 09:45 PM

decided to wait til after the holidays,
but we plan to put a plain ol' woodstove in.
gonna cost about a grand for just the exterior chimney.

#20 captainpicard420

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 02:57 AM

I would recommend against the pellet stove in most cases, as they generally use electricity to power the blowers and auger used to feed pellets into the combustion chamber.

That said I have one and it's wonderful and much cheaper than gas heat. That is it's great as long as the power is on, which it often isn't during snow/ice storms. Besides that with pellets yoiu have to depend on someone selling them in your area or having them delivered which is expensive.

On the other hand, wood is generally free.




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