Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

P.Cyans ancestral habitat


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 JoeActionhero

JoeActionhero

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 7 posts

Posted 14 January 2010 - 03:35 PM

From what I've heard, all our cyans seem to be descended from the original ones found in Kew Gardens, London in 1948. Enthusiasts are responsible for it haveing naturalized to wood-chips and spreading throughout the northern hemisphere.

But it's speculated that it's original habitat was, like the Columbia River p. Azurescens at Astoria, in sand dunes, seagrass, and driftwood. They have taken to such a setting here on Pender Island, BC (with a bit of help from the Beneficient Myco-Spreading Human, me!).

Under seagrass the driftwood and especially the styrofoam flotsam chips and particulizes into an incredible growth medium. Very airy. Do give this a try with colonized mulch from your found patches if you live close to an estruary! Cyan's are salt tolerant, too, so the tides will spread our friends far and wide.

Handfuls of mulch tossed into running streams also insure wide dispersal. Enough for all for ever and ever! GO BABY, GO!
  • kcmoxtractor likes this

#2 psilocypher

psilocypher

    Deceased

  • Expired Member
  • 435 posts

Posted 14 January 2010 - 03:40 PM

Interesting.....

#3 kocos

kocos

    The PsYhead

  • Expired Member
  • 2,641 posts

Posted 14 January 2010 - 04:05 PM

Once i manage to get my patches going iam going to make gallons of spore slury and spray every single woodchip and mulch bed i can find in town... Muhahahaha :evil:
  • happy4nic8r likes this

#4 ethnobotanica

ethnobotanica

    Botanical-manical

  • Free Member
  • 1,827 posts

Posted 14 January 2010 - 05:31 PM

I always thought it was the other way around. The Kew garden reports are what got me looking for, and finding them;), in England. Central London to be more precise.

I've since created my own patch from transferred myc.:)

It might be possible that they started in Europe, made it to Kew with the importation of many tree species then found their way to the PNW.

#5 Alan Rockefeller

Alan Rockefeller

    Mycologist

  • OG VIP
  • 1,906 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 15 January 2010 - 06:57 AM

Since azurescens only grows in a small area along the oregon/washingon border and azurescens is so close to cyanescens, I think it makes sense to assume that cyanescens started in a similar way.

I wonder if the dune grasses that they grow on are native.

#6 ethnobotanica

ethnobotanica

    Botanical-manical

  • Free Member
  • 1,827 posts

Posted 15 January 2010 - 07:44 AM

I always imagined that many species originated in mexico and as they spread round the world they evolved into many other species. Who knows eh....? Theories of 'spores from space' and all that....;)

Given the time frame and the fact that mexico has more species than any other country as well as the highest ufo sighting rate in the world....and the most reference to mushrooms and extra-terrestrial beings of any ancient culture....:eusa_thin ;)

Never-mind those crock-pot ideas eh...:lol:

Kidding aside, it might be possible that the different species evolved as they worked their way up the west coast of the america's to more temperate environments.

Peace

#7 mjshroomer

mjshroomer

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 2,323 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 15 January 2010 - 01:57 PM

[quote name='JoeActionhero']From what I've heard, all our cyans seem to be descended from the original ones found in Kew Gardens, London in 1948. Enthusiasts are responsible for it having naturalized to wood-chips and spreading throughout the northern hemisphere.

But it's speculated that it's original habitat was, like the Columbia River p. Azurescens at Astoria, in sand dunes, sea grass, and driftwood. They have taken to such a setting here on Pender Island, BC (with a bit of help from the Beneficent Myco-Spreading Human, me!).
[/QUOTE]

A few minor and major corrections regarding both P. cyanescens and especially some truths about the back-stabbing renaming of P. astoriensis by Gartz and Stamets which appeared in the Italian Journal under the taxonomic name of Psilocybe azurescens A journal like Integration. (Italian on the left column and English on the right column). In Integregation it was (German on the Left and English on the right). P. azurescens is a name that many Oregonians apparently became quite pissed at Paul Stamets and at Jochen Gartz for using it.

While this took me such a long time to piece together and then when I went to post images from the whole thread response, it appeared the time settings by the late Hippie3 interfered with the posting of the data I put together and so some was lost. Luckily I had save a large portion of the post in word so I could still keep my interest in this matter and be able to post it pretty accurately as much as possible.

First I want to start with some notations about Psilocybe cyanescens and its original taxonomic classification by Mz. Alexandria Wakefield from Kew Gardens In Surrey. I might also mention that this same mushrooms was known of in 1948 at the Royal Botanical gardens in Glascow Scotland by friends of Dr. Roy Watling in the later 1940s as well as in Kew Gardens. The woodchips of this species is different in the UK than in the PNW of the USA. Here Alder is the primary feeder for numerous species of Psilocybe of which there are 22 species of psilocybian fungi in the Pacific Northwest.

And some confusion as to origins of species which are considered to be cross-over species.
For instance, Psilocybe stuntzii is a pasture mushroom as is Psilocybe semilanceata and Psilocybe strictipes. all three grow with their mycelia attached to the roots of wild grasses. Additionally, so is Psilocybe baeocystis. And the you have two manured species, Psilocybe fimetaria and Psilocybe sierrae. P. fimetaria and P. stuntzii are known as blue ringers because , like a cubensis, when the cap opens, it retains the remnants of a veil which when damaged or drying in the sun, tends to turn to a blue hue, thus the ephithet, blue ringer. They also are very common abundantly in lawns, yet in pasturelands are very scares and considered to be quite rare. You could look in hundreds of pastures for years and never find but a few blue ringers or a P. baeocystis.

In Europe, liberty caps, like in the USA are pastureland shrooms, common more in cattle and sheep fields. In sheep fields they are usually much shorter in the stem due to the fact that sheep are natural lawn mowers and chew the grass till it is all small so the shrooms will only growth the height of the grass. This also occurs in lawns that weekly cut the grass to a certain size. if the grass is left unattended for a week or two then the mushrooms grow to a bigger size and height. But these species are also common in lawns as is P. strictipes which looks like a shorter liberty cap. In the PNW, both species can be found on golf courses along the Oregon coast, on well manicure soccer fields in the Puget Sound region of the PNW and P. stuntzii and P. fimetaria grow well in well manicured newly fertilized lawns on new apartment complexes, new restaurant lawns, government building lawns. The spores for the blue ringers come in with the sod and when new lawns are laid, and have weekly lawn care, the shrooms can grow for many years.\ Each square of sod is equal to a whole field of scattered mushrooms, but in a manner of a cramped field say a 300 acre field squished into a one foot squared space so that the nitrogen/phosphate rich sodded soil with grass-seed allows the mushrooms to full the entire area of a square foot. So each square foot of sod would amount to many pounds on a new lawn. Many new buildings will use a lawn service for several years and then realize it is too expensive to keep up so then they will use a company employee to mow the lawn, thus the lawns lose the weekly fertilizers which keep the shrooms reappearing throughout the year. At times, blue ringers can appear each month of the year in warmer climates and water sprinkler systems help them to keep growing even thought it is not their season.

These same lawns every now and then also give rise to baeocystis appearing in between the blue ringers or maybe just a small garden of P. baeocystis.

P.sierrae is similar to a lib and a ringer with a slight ring and are smaller..

Now take P. cyanescens, a woodchip mushroom that loves decayed rotted wood rich in humus and linguin. They love alder and black berry brambles. Many trees in the PNW are mulched with a mixture of hardwoods and alder and when the lawn mower man runs his mower around a tree that has mulch, if tend to chop up the shrooms and caps growing along the sides of the edges of the mulched areas of the trees. This puts billions of spores on the blades of the mower and spreads them into the grass surrounding the trees mulched areas.

Also, many areas can have a layer of mulch or fine sawdust mulch or fine woodchips and then be seeded with grass, thus causing grassy areas to produce P. cyanescens, although their primary habitat is woodchips and wood products that are decaying. One can even grow mycelia on soaked corrugated cardboard. I have grown cyans indoors and also on cardboard. And I even grew cubes on a rice cake bought at the grocery store. I know many of you have seen Roger Rabbit's bountiful biblical shrooms grown on the bible. OF course the paper is made from rice.Now about the cyans. again a cross over species, but still most common in the dead wood where it colonizes into unbelievable large amounts of growth, sometimes I have seen patches of 200 pounds or more in a single area.

So Cyans did not grow originally in Kew Gardens. It is just the place where Dr. Wakefield first reported them mycologically as being and reported their habitat with rhoderdendrons and taxonomicaly named them, P. cyanescens. cyanescens meaning of bluing.

I must mention that the majority of European transfers of P. azurescens, as well as the ones in New York, Ohio, Arizona, and a few other states and several European countries, including over 30 patches in Germany transplanted by Gartz, failed to return after a couple of years of growth. Also I have in my files, several photographs, including in the cultivation history book at my site, The pictures of Gartz’ outdoor grown azures which failed to macroscopically fully resemble their actual physical features as they once appeared in their natural Oregon dune habitat. Also, never once has any transplanted patches ever spread across neighborhoods or into other peoples yards and spread around the country as one would think that they do. They will grow from one to three years, and as noted, once the nutrients in the soils and mulchbeds have beeb absorbed and used up, the shrooms do not return.

And comments about P. cyanescens from Kew are not true, Psilocybe cyanescens was first botanically identified by mycologist Alexandria Wakefield in 1948s. It was collected at that time in Kew Gardens in Surrey but was found all through the UK. It is a northern hemisphere mushrooms growing throughout most of northern Europe including Italy, Spain, France, the Nederland, Scandinavia, the Baltic’s and even into Russia. Has never been found in Greece or Crete.

In Northern Algeria, Morocco and Tripoli you have Psilocybe maire, a species that macroscopically resembles Psilocybe cyanescens. and in the Netherlands, a related species close to P. cyanescens and maybe just a synonym is Hypholoma cyanescens.

An example of where a patch is reported from is that of Stropharia cubensis Earle, first reported as occurring in Cuba in 1904 by Earle, while two years later a paper written by French mycologist Patouillard noted his discovery if the same mushroom in manure in Tonkin (what is now Hanoi, north Vietnam). He named it as Naematoloma caerulescens Patouillard. And a few years later it was again discovered in another location and given a third name, all become synonyms and then in the late 1950s, Rolf Singer renamed it as, Psilocybe cubensis [Earle] Sing.

Strangely enough, many people think it was originally from Cuba and then spread around the world. Cubes are an Asian and Southeast Asia species, more common in Buffalo manure in that region of the world then in the manure of cattle. Water buffalo outnumber the cattle in that region and in Africa by 100-1.

And back to P. cyanescens, it is predominant in the Pacific Northwest, from San Francisco to British Columbia and a few undocumented reports in southern Alaska. ITs main area of growth is along the I-5 corridor from San Francisco to B.C. Canada and east of the Olympics and west of the cascades, with Seattle as its epicenter. In the PNW its preferred habitat is alder wood branches, twigs and stems, sawdust and finely small woodchips and grows well in association with ivy, black berry brambles, rhododendrons, rose bushes, etc. In thirty-five years I found in one spot in the middle of a clear-cut in Kingston, Washington, ten feet off the logging road in the middle of a clear cut, 18 specimens in the woods. I have never found them again in what is considered their natural habitat.

In man made environments, they are abundant by the thousands and tens of thousands/ However, within three years, most patches automatically disappear unless the land is re mulched with alder. Also, Ivy and blackberries eventually tend to eat all the nutrients in the soils and the mycelia eats the decaying woodchips till there is no more room for the mycelia to feed on and thus the patch is gone. The third problem is patch papers who rip all the clusters and clumps from the topsoil’s and mulched areas so nothing returns the following year. In the past five years in the PNW, patches of cyanescens that have been steady growth for more than 35 years are now gone. Also, clear cuts are now 99% illegal so we have a disappearance of alder and because of a shortage of the alder, cedar is used as decorative mulch and this causes no shrooms to grow in cedar as it is to acidity,

Also, like P. pelliculosa, ten to 12 hits in a fresh pound, they grow in clear cuts where pine and cedar are logged out by the hundreds of thousands yet if one walks ten feet into the edge of the forest, you cannot find a single mushroom. again, rare in the wild, and abundant in man made environments.

In one year in the UK, close to what is reported as a hundred pound patch, was noted at a local racetrack in the UK, identified by British mycologist and published in both an academic journal as well as several British Newspapers?

[quote]
The Guardian Unlimited

Wednesday, January 3, 2001

Magic mushrooms thrive as weeds wane
by
Paul Brown, environment correspondent
Guardian Unlimited
Wednesday January 3, 2001
Hippies would have thought they were hallucinating. The horses would have failed a dope test. Geoffrey Kibb was amazed but stone cold sober and knew a scientific phenomenon when he saw one.
Mr Kibb discovered the holy grail of the 1960s hippie culture, the most potent magic mushrooms known to science, growing in a vast carpet on a racetrack in the south of England. He estimated there were 100,000 of them, enough to blow the mind of an entire town.
He reported his findings to fellow researcher Peter Shaw, an expert in fungi. To him the field of wavy-capped magic mushroom (Psilocybe cyanes-cens) was confirmation of an astonishing colonization of Britain by exotic species of mushroom - an invasion innocently caused by gardeners anxious to keep weeds at bay.
Dr Shaw says that by spreading wood chips over the ground gardeners create the perfect habitat for fungi of all sorts. The wavy-capped magic mushroom, "a particularly aggressive species" and a native of the Pacific north-west of America, is now firmly established in gardens, parks and any other place where wood chips are used for weed control.
About 10 species of mushroom are eaten for their hallucinogenic qualities. Psilocybe cyanescens is identified by its wavy cap, purple brown spore print and rapid blueing of stem and cap on bruising, although there are poisonous species of similar appearance.
The blueing reflects the high psilocin/psilocybin content of the fungus (which as any old hippie will tell you is the bit that makes you fly). Dr Shaw is presenting his findings today at the British Ecological Society meeting in Birmingham where he is inviting amateur mycologists to hunt down other rare species.
On his way to work at the University of Surrey Dr Shaw passes a roundabout in Leatherhead. "The roundabout was mulched in 1999 and in May 2000 a flush of creamy-yellow fungi came up."
They turned out to be four different exotic varieties growing in the wood chips - one of which, Agrocybe putaminium, had only been recorded once before in Britain, at Kew gardens. "The wood chips were bought from a commercial supplier in Essex, but how they acquired their strange fungal flora is still unclear."
The bad news for magic mushroom hunters - deliberate growing of magic mushrooms for use is illegal but mere possession is not - is that this is not the time of year for fruiting.
But out of sight the roots from which they grow are spreading rapidly. Dr Shaw's theory is that suppliers keep vast heaps of wood chips in nurseries, allowing aggressive fungi to colonise..
Wood chips and bark chips make a better habitat than the original decaying wood on which the fungi grow. This is because the root structure does not have to force its way through a hard surface but glides between the chips.
Because of his Leatherhead experience and other discoveries Dr Shaw says there are bound to be exotic species not thought to exist in Britain growing happily in gardens, and some have already transferred to the wild - the magic mushroom has been been found growing on trees in Burnham Beeches, Buckinghamshire.
[/quote]



In Europe, mycologist Kreiglesteiner confused it as identical to four other separate species that later were proven to be individual species different than that of P. cyanescens. Among those were P. serbica, P. maire, and P. bohemica.

Now about P. azurescens, named by Gartz and Stamets who both were aware that for more than 16 years it was known locally to Oregonians as Psilocybe astoriensis of which I am now going to explain a little of the history of this mushroom..

Actually. Psilocybe astoriensis, (Scammed and renamed officially behind my back after introducing Jochen Gartz first to my friend Mark Herke of Astoria in 1990 and we collected many specimens which were mailed back to Germany from Salem, Oregon, and then I introduced Jochen to Gary Menser, author of Hallucinogenic and Poisonous Mushrooms and to Paul Stamets in 1990 at Paul's home in Shelton, Washington).

I should explain that as a participant in the original Myco-Media annual mushroom conferences which began after the 1st and 2nd Int. Conf. on Hallucinogenic fungi, the first held in Oregon in 1976 and then the 2nd International Conference of hallucinogenic Fungi at Fort Worden, Port Townsend in the fall of 1977 respectively, and then the Myco Media 1-3 began at Camp Orkila on Orcas Island for several years and then moved to Breittenbush Hot Springs in Lake Detroit, Oregon, sixty miles east of Salem, Oregon, in the early 1980s.

Some Conferences of importance that helped to spread the awareness of Psilocybian consciousness throughout the PNW and the West Coast to other parts of America and Europe developed amongst a small groups of experts and amateur mycologists, of which I became one. I am now posting a short abridged list of several Myco Media and other conferences, several which were held at Breittenbush Hot Springs and omitting other held elsewhere as I am pertaining to those regarding the presence of P. astoriensis (azurescens) in Oregon and Southern Washington.

[quote]
I and other Oregonians began bringing to the attention of the public in the early 1980s, a new species of the same color of P. cyanescens but with a much broader wide reddish caramel colored cap with an umbo and nipple but no wavy cap. Since this mushroom had no Latin name bestowed on it, I and other locals began to refer to it as P. astoriensis, it’s original local name, first collected in both Hammond and Astoria, Oregon from Sand dunes off of highway 1 along the southern Oregon coastline. And displayed publicly at Breittenbush Hot Springs annual mushroom show, as well as the Eugene Oregon Mycological Society annual meeting and the Portland mycological annual fall show. We also found large collections in southern Washington from Kelso to the Hammond Astoria region. Even in the early 1980s, Steven Peele of the Florida Mycology Research Center for lack of a better name, came up with his Astori-ossip which an article by Steven from his early journal is noted on the front mushroom page of erowid.org. He purchased a print from JLF as a mixture of B+ and P. cyanescens, obviously a made up mixture which was not true. He called it astori-ossip for lack of anything better,

Another phony spore peddler, a Mr. G, referred to it as a mushroom discovered by Dr. Hammond in Oregon who would be quite mad at people calling it other names. Mr. G had no Idea that the Hammond was not a Dr. but a sister city next to Astoria where the shroom grew in abundance.
[/quote]

[quote]
Conferences:


1. The first conference on entheogenic healing plants and drugs took place in San Francisco in 1967 and was known as “An Ethnopharmacological Search for Psychoactive Drugs.” Among the presenters at that conference were R. Gordon Wasson, Richard Evans Schultes, Andrew Weil, Carlos Castaneda and Alexander Shulgin among others.

2. The next conference was the First International Conference on hallucinogenic Mushrooms which took place at Millersylvania State Park in Washington in October, 1976 and included the following speakers: Jeremy Bigwood, Lynn R, Brady, W. Scott Chilton, Gastón Guzmán, Dale T. Leslie, Stephen H. Pollock, David B. Repke, Paul Stamets and R. Gordon Wasson. This was $125.00 per person, outdoor camping and meals.

3. The 2nd International Conference on Hallucinogenic Mushrooms, Ft. Wordon, Port Townsend Washington from October 27-30, 1977 (extracts published in Teonanacatl: Hallucinogenic Mushrooms of North America, Ott and Bigwood, 1978). Among the speakers here were: Jeremy Bigwood, Scott Chilton, Gastón Guzmán, David Harnden, Albert Hofmann, Dale T. Leslie, Jonathan Ott, David B. Repke, Richard Rose, Carl A. P. Ruck, Richard Evans Schultes, R. Gordon Wasson, Andrew T. Weil and Norman Zinsburg. Room and board at the military post were included.

4. A Mushroom Identification Workshop was held between October 14-15, 1978 at Shinn Lodge of the YMCA’s Camp Dudley, near Clear Lake, Washington. Cost was $25.00 per person and included bunk beds and a pot luck meal. This workshop was especially designed for amateur mycologists interested in further perfecting mushroom identification skills. Limited to 50 people.

5. Then came the Conference on Hallucinogens and Shamanism in Native American Life. This was held in October-November of 1978 at the Japan Trade Center In beautiful San Francisco. Tickets for this happening were $125.00. Speakers included: Jeremy Bigwood, Scott Chilton, José Luis Díaz, Stanislav Grof, David Harnden, Albert Hofmann, Bo Homstedt, Reid Kaplan, Keewaydinoquay (K. M. Paschel), Weston LaBarre, Timothy Plowman, Carl A. P. Ruck, Richard Evans Schultes, Alexander Shulgin, R. Gordon Wasson, Andrew T. Weil and Norman Zinsburg. And much of these proceedings were later published in the Journal of Psychedelic Drugs vol. 11(1-2), 1979. Meals were included but hotel accommodations were separate.

6. Mushrooms 1. November 2-4, 1979. This workshop was held along the Oregon coast, cost was $90.00 per person and room and board. This conference was in honor of Dr. Gaston Guzman who had just completed his long awaited monograph on the genus Psilocybe, although the book did not appear in print until 1983. Speakers included: Gasón Guzmán, Daniel Stuntz, Andrew Weil, Michael Beug, Steven H. Pollock, Catherine Scates, Jeremy Bigwood, Scott Jeffreys, James Q. Jacobs, Dale T. Leslie, Gary P. Menser, Freeman Rowe, and Paul Stamets.

7. Now the conferences became part of Myco Media and the first one of those was Mushrooms II held on Orcas Island in the Straits of Juan de Fuca in the San Juan Islands at Camp Orkila between October 31-November 2, 1980. Here one camped out in open door cabins usually attended by Girl Scouts. This particular conference was expressly designed for those interested in developing their identification skills and furthering their understanding of the taxonomy, chemistry, cultivation and ecology of mushrooms. Emphasis is placed on the delineation of edible, poisonous and psychoactive species. By now the cost was up to $100.00 dollars with room and board. Speakers included: Alexander H. Smith, Daniel Stuntz, Gastón Guzmán, Michael Beug, William C. Denison, Claude Fordyce, James M. Trappe, Joseph Ammirati, Emanuel Salzman, Andrew T. Weil, Stephen H. Pollock, Catherine Scates, Dale T. Leslie and Paul Stamets.

8. Mushrooms III, again held on Orcas Island at the same girl Scout Camp. This time from October 30-November 2, 1981. Again a $100.00 fee and room and board included. This conference held the theme of the one the year before and included the following speakers, many who came back from the previous year to add new info to their research: Daniel Stuntz, Michael Beug, William C. Dennison, Ralph Kurtzman, Rick Kerrigan, Gary Lincoff, Andrew T. Weil, Catherine Scates, Michael Foley, Dale T. Leslie, Paul E. Stamets, James Q. Jacobs and Jeffrey S. Chilton.


10. <b>Mushrooms IV, An Educational Conference held October 27-30, 1983 in the foothills in Oregon At Breitenbush Hot Springs in Lake Detroit. Fee is $135.00 and room and board in a geothermal heated cabin. Very friendly atmosphere and really cool people. Meals include and room included. Speakers at this event included: Michael Beug, Andrew T. Weil, Gary Lincoff, Catherine Scates, James Q. Jacobs, Terence McKenna, Paul Stamets, Jeffrey Chilton, Rick Kerrigan, Michael Foley, Dale Leslie and Steve Morgan.</b>

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1263581758

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1263590128

I also, along with some friends from Seattle brought several pounds of P. astoriensis to this 1889 conference at Breittebush. Where I also presented a slide show and lecture on Hawaii as well as the PNW/ Paul Stamets was also at this conference and aware of this species. below I will note from a letter Paul mailed to me in Hawaii in 1987, two years before the above conference although I had brought this mushroom to the earlier conference in 1983 and 1984.

12. Wild Mushrooms 1989 was the Seventh Annual Breitenbush Mycological Conference held from October 26-29, 1989. Room and board included. This one was now $150.00 per person. Speakers included David Arora, Walt Sturgeon, Paul Przybylowics, Annette Simonson, James Q. Jacobs, Kent Powloski, John W. Allen, Nancy Weber, Karl L. R. Jansen, Tjakko Stijve, Paul Stamets, Miriam C. Rice and Brendan McFarlan.

13. Wild Mushrooms 1990. Again held at Breitenbush between November 1-4, 1990 and the cost for room and board was again $150.00 per person. Speakers included: Jim Trappe, Bryce Kendrick, James Q. Jacobs, John W. Allen, Jochen Gartz, Maggie Rogers, Walt Sturgeon, Michael Beug, Thom O’Dell balafon (Raggae Music band).

14. Wild Mushrooms 1991. Also at Breitenbush. This was $175.00 and room and board. Speakers included, John W. Allen, Tjakko Stijve, Karl L. R. Jansen, Jochen Gartz, David Arora, Lorelei Norvell, Bryce Kendrick, Thom O’Dell and Efran Cazares..
16. Psychedelic Summit, April 16th, 1993. This one is one the 50th anniversary of Albert Hofmann’s discovery of LSD, held in San Francisco. Hosted Bruce Eisner, author of Ecstacy and founder of the Island Group. It cost $100.00 dollars per person and include meals. Speakers included Rick Doblin, Oscar Janiger, taped messages from both Albert Hofmann and Humphrey Osmond, Tim Leary, Ralph Abraham, Alura Huxley, Robert Anton Wilson, Stephen Gaskin, Paul Krassner, Willis Harman, Donna Dryer and Richard Yensin, Lester Grinspoon, John Robbins, and Claudio Naranjo.

18. The Maui Botanical Preservation Corp Conference was held at a boy scout camp Keanae on August 13-17th in the late summer of 1993. Cost was $175.00 and room and board at the camp was included. Speakers included Jonathan Ott, David Orr, Jonathan “Sparrow” Miller, John W. Allen ,Brett Blausser and Jonathan Ott’s wife Djahel who dance for us. There were other speakers there but again I could not find the flyers.

19. The Gathering of the Minds was the brain child of Ron Piper and James Kent, publisher and editors of the now defunct magazine Psychedelic Illuminations, The conference was phenomenal with more than 50 guest lecturers and presenters and was held at Chapman University in Orange County Los Angeles on April 28, 1994. Meals were only for the speakers. And the cost was $35.00 per person for all day, $25.00 prepaid. Speakers include: John W. Allen, Michael Benner, Cliff Benton, Peter Bralver, Gary Bravo, Chris Conrad, Valeri Corral, Jim DeKorne, Rick Doblin, Troy Donahue (not the movie actor but president of the Mt. Shasta Mycological Society), Donna Dryer, Bruce Eisner, Genie Erstad, Robert Forte, Diana Gail, Jochen Gartz, Steven Gaskin, Michael Gilbert, Charles Grob, Peter Gorman, Nina Graboi, Roberta Hamilton, Jack Herer, Oscar Janiger, James Kent, Leeona Klippstein, Ellen Komb, Paul Krassner, Lorin Lindner, Timothy Leary, Bernard McCrane, Dennis McKenna, Ralph Metzner, David E. Nichols, Judy Osburn, Lynn Osburn, Jonathan Ott, Ron Piper, Caroljo Papac, Thomas Pinkson, Ram Das (Richard Alpert), Retinalogic, mark Riva, Ya’Anna Vera Rocha, Peter Stafford, Cliff Shaffer, Lynnette Shaw, Steven Starsparks, Starroot, Daniel Tvedt, and Richard Yensen.

24. Wild Entheogenic Mushrooms 1997. Cost for a four hour mushroom Identification Workshop by John W. Allen is 35 dollars per person. Held in University -Used Bookstore in Seattle, Washington. Speaker: John W. Allen.

I along with several friends brought these mushrooms to Breittenbush in the early 1980s (1983 and 1984, and later in 1987 and 1990 and 1991. The 4th myco media conference was the first held at Breittenbush in October of 1984.
[/quote]

About Psilocybe cyansescens astoria ossip [originally named by Steven Peele of the FMRC]
The two articles below are completely sarong. This person puts strange philosophy which makes no sense, calls himself TEONANACATL with no idea what the word means. Notes that Gartz makes certain statements in the essays below that are not the words of Jochen Gartz, Does not note that Gartz did find baeocystin in the Psilcyne azurescens mushrooms., and the philosophilcal comments made by TEONANACATL also do not relate directly to what this person is trying to say. HE is offering prints with strange names for his collections that make no sense at all. He claims that there are b/w graphics by Gartz but there are none and claims that an article by Gartz is also posted below and it is not. HE claims it made its way to UK from the northern USA. It is from Hammond/Astoria, Oregon, and then he goes on to say it is from a subtropical mountain area of the USA. That makes no sense since the OPregon coast is not a sub tropical mountainous area. He quotes doses of 75 milligrams of psilocine/psilocybine when a Mazatec dosage would be 20-40 milligrams, more than an average shroomer would consume. HE then goes on to say that, ["There is many things to learn still about TEONANACATL in it's many forms: - PCY-AO certainly belongs to the genus Psilocybe, but the exact species is currently not known. Local mycologists stated that sHe does fit the
description of Psilocybe Cyanescens in 'all' points; other people tend to
believe that it is a separate species.] Calls his strain PCY-AO. HE also states that [- Very probably the high entheogenic potency of PCY-AO is due mainly to its
comparably high content of psilocybin and/or psilocin. (Nor)Baeocystin and
yet unknown compounds may also be present. To my knowledge until now no
analytical data exist. Dried samples of PCY-AO were sent to the university
of Leipzig for a chemical analysis, the results of which will hopefully be
available soon.] I talked to Gartz about this guy years ago and Gartz hasd no idea who this dude was. Gartz' [paper with Stamets appeared in vol. 6 iof Eleusis 3 weks after erowid posted this paper. Gartz never analyzed any of this persons speciemens and does not recall receiving any papers from such a person and his rant of philosophy as I note reeks of narcissism. John allen.


http://www.erowid.or...ens_info1.shtml
[quote]

TEONANACATL 1995 Psilocybe Cyanescens Astoria Ossip
=============================================================

following texts accompanied spores of Psilocybe Cyanescens Astoria
Ossip, which were dispatched in january and february 1995.
some of the letters additionally contained b/w grafics of sporeprints
or a copy of the article by J. Gartz (#6, below).


to my revered teacher, and powerful ally, T E O N A N A C A T L

"I am older, older than thought in your species. My Mystic and Magickal
powers have been known by WOmen since thousands of years before Buddha and
Christ. Societies that have followed my rule have lived in harmony with
nature. I can bring the mightiest wars before your eyes, or - show you -
Death. Can show you: certainty (not faith) and peace - unutterable. And I
can give you laughter, joy, and ecstasy - ineffable. Showing the future to
those who dare is nothing: I could place you with the Gods. And my joy is to
see your joy and my ecstasy is in yours. Learning to reproduce my growing
environment you will come to love me. The mushrooms which you see are only
the part of my body dedicated to sex thrills, sunbathing and the communion
with symbiotic species. My true body, hardware for my collective hypermind,
is an underground network of fine fibers, which may cover many acres, grow
for thousands of years, and can have far more connections than even the
human brain. Learning .. thy Way .. you will look upon me with awe and
amazement - FOR I AM THE FLESH OF THE GODS. "

(1) O. T. Oss, O. N. Oeric - Psilocybin/ Magic Mushroom Grower's Guide
(1976), 2nd, revised ed. available. (2) S. L. Peele - Fruit Of The Gods
(1982). (3) for descriptions of giant armillaria fungi (honey mushrooms)
see Nature, April 1992; SporesAfield, archived at: gopher.econet.apc.org
/environment/misc/mycology. (4) Lao Tse - Tao Te King

The classic (1) sold more than 100,000 copies and helped a lot to ensure
that TEONANACATL will not be (again) censored into oblivion. The grain-jar
method of growing Ps. Cubensis and other leave/compost/dung-eating species
is fastest and can easily be done indoors. But it is also quite laborious,
and even if these mushrooms are grown on straw or compost, the cultures are
short-lived and require repeated sterile lab work for propagation. (5)

Wood-loving species, however, (and especially those preferring a colder
climate), like Ps. Cyanescens, can easily be allowed to grow in outdoor beds
like perennial plants -comparable to trees-, requiring no (more) labwork.
It should be pointed out, that mushrooms of a strikingly similar habitat
are probably the biggest living organisms on earth today, as well as among
the oldest (3).
J. Gartz recently described a "new method of mushroom cultivation in
N-America", which can indeed do without any labwork (6).

Some european growers prefer to start with a (onetime) run of spawn-
production (agar-dishes, glasses of oats/rye/barley, then glasses/bags of
woodchips) in spring, which usually results in a first harvest in fall, and
a mushroom bed that can be enlarged both in area and yield in the next years
and very probably be maintained far beyond human lifetime. Clean wood debris
(like from a planing machine. sawdust does not work) seem to work even
better than freshly chopped wood. Although Ps. Cy. seems to be able to fruit
on plain wood without any casing, it is advisable to supply the bed with
enough soil (+seeds), and leaves and larger branches, as the mushrooms
really love to grow in between and under grass or other plants.

The mushroom-beds obtained can be left on their own most of the year and
(in a good location) need attention only at harvesting time. Outdoors
unfavorable weather may of course diminish or prevent a year's harvest,
but as this cannot hurt the mass of underground mycelium, the shrooms
will just make up for it next season.

(5) P. Stamets, J. S. Chilton - The Mushroom Cultivator (1983)
(6) Integration, J. for mind-moving plants & culture, 4 (1993)

-------------------------------------------------------------------

"Oh, growing them seems to be no less consciousness - expanding than eating
them." a -then new- pupil of Teonanacatl quite correctly realized.

Psilocybe cyanescens Astoria Ossip made its way to europe from the northern
U.S., but may well have originated elsewhere, even -as a mycologist pointed
out- from (sub)tropical mountain areas. Like Psilocybe Cyanescens
(Wakefield), the "Wavy Cap" known from Britain and US., IT NEEDS A FEW WEEKS
OF COLD (NEAR FREEZING) WEATHER FOR FRUITING, and seems to feed on any kind
of wood, cardboard or similar. Mycelium and fruiting bodies are strongly
blueing and the latter have an entheogenic potency, which was described as
'at least twice that of Ps. Cub.' and 'not weaker than Ps. Semilanc.' after
comparisons with dried and weighed samples. The caps of Ps. cy. A. O., which
easily grow bigger than 3" in dia, are often distinctly umbonate and rarely
wavy, and there is other hints, that it may just as well be a species
closely related to, but not identical with Psilocybe Cyanescens.

The visionary experience induced by 2 to 2.5 g (dry/80 kg) of P. cy. A. O.
has been described as colorful, psychedelic and as deep and far-out as can
be, effecting the mind without any stress on the body. It may encompass
about everything which S. Grof described in his excellent books (7) or which
can be found in the Bardo T.dol (8). It is sometimes threatening, nearly
always astonishing and enlightening, and has been found healing in quite a
few cases.

(7) Realms of the Unconscious (1975) -- + J. Halifax: The Human Encounter
with Death (1977) -- LSD Psychotherapy (1979, new edition available, after
all) -- Beyond Death (1980). (8) The Great Liberation Through Hearing in The
Bardo = The Tibetan Book of the Dead.

Ps. cy. A. O. grows very vigorously and usually produces spores copiously.
It is quite exciting to watch under a microscope, how a high percentage of
these germinate within 6-36 hours when put onto agar at room temperature.

* Send at least $ 2 (cash or stamps only) for more infos, or $ 5 for a
small sample of spores (but ample enough for microscopy and propagation),
or $ 10 to $ 20 for an entire, more decorative sporeprint of P. cy. A. O.
to: TEONANACATL/(postlagernd)/ Postamt 1092 Wien/ A-1092 Vienna, Austria *

TUNE IN: to universal knowledge and perception unveiled.
DROP OUT: object consumerism. stop the war against Earth and People.
TURN ON: SMI**2LE: Increase Intelligence.

... and *study* all of Leary, A. Huxley and R. A. Wilson ! and Kerouac &
Castaneda. TEONANACATL teaches patience and perseverance, too.

!
TEONANACATL does not sell mushrooms. TEONANACATL does not sell anything.
TEONANACATL teaches that materialistic consumerism is endangering WOmankind.
TEONANACATL advocates conscientious consumerism objection.
TEONANACATL explicitly disrecommends the breaking of any Law.
TEONANACATL teaches responsibility.
TEONANACATL is a model for networking and cooperation.
!
McCopies & D.Stribute
!

======================================================================

McCopies & D.Stribute * STARSEED * PL 0 SAG MA 0 VIR

Enclosed is spores of PCY-AO, collected in fall 1994. Please treat them with
responsibility and the respect due to all forms of life.

* item void where prohibited-prohibition void if violating human rights !

They come from mushrooms growing outside in a forest environment, and
therefore some contamination with other spores is possible. But great care
was taken not to introduce additional contaminants, and the sporeprints were
all sealed into plastic within a few days of taking them. Especially when
kept in a cool and dark place they will stay viable for many years.
At least small parts of the spores of each mushroom were already spread in
promising places and so given back to earth, thankfully.

These spores are provided to enable research on this fascinating but not
well known organism. Your feedback will be highly welcome. I hope that this
will help to find answers to some of below. They must not be sold and
neither the spores nor any derivatives thereof should be used to gain
personal profit or for other ethically doubtful purposes.

There is many things to learn still about TEONANACATL in it's many forms:

- PCY-AO certainly belongs to the genus Psilocybe, but the exact species is
currently not known. Local mycologists stated that sHe does fit the
description of Psilocybe Cyanescens in 'all' points; other people tend to
believe that it is a separate species.

- Very probably the high entheogenic potency of PCY-AO is due mainly to its
comparably high content of psilocybin and/or psilocin. (Nor)Baeocystin and
yet unknown compounds may also be present. To my knowledge until now no
analytical data exist. Dried samples of PCY-AO were sent to the university
of Leipzig for a chemical analysis, the results of which will hopefully be
available soon.

+ Progress in the most promising kind of research, however - the goal of
which was summarized beautifully by Aldous Huxley in 1962 in a letter to
Albert Hofmann (below) - has been made nearly impossible for several
decades now through propaganda, censorship and oppression, which now openly
employ the methods of war . . .


I HOPE TO SEE THE DEVELOPMENT OF A TECHNIQUE OF -APPLIED MYSTICISM- A
TECHNIQUE FOR INDIVIDUALS TO GET THE MOST OUT OF THEIR TRANSCENDENTAL
EXPERIENCE AND TO MAKE USE OF THE INSIGHTS FROM THE -OTHER WORLD- IN THE
AFFAIRS OF -THIS WORLD-. (MEISTER ECKHART WROTE THAT 'WHAT IS TAKEN IN BY
CONTEMPLATION MUST BE GIVEN OUT IN LOVE'.) THIS IS WHAT MUST BE DEVELOPED -

THE ART OF GIVING OUT IN LOVE AND INTELLIGENCE WHAT IS TAKEN IN FROM VISION

AND THE EXPERIENCE OF SELF-TRANSCENDENCE AND SOLIDARITY
WITH UNIVERSE. (edited, 1994)
.. there still is hope .. the wall in Berlin did come down, too.
.. just another crack in your wall.
[email protected]
[/quote]

And another on the analaysis of Psilocybe cyanescens Astoria Ossip

[quote]

http://www.erowid.or...ms_info10.shtml

Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Newsgroups: alt.drugs.psychedelics
From: [email protected] (miracoulix)
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 21:26:39 UTC
Subject: TEONANACATL 1995 PCYAO, part 3: analytical data


* Samples of Psilocybe Cyanescens Astoria Ossip (from outdoor
natural culture) and also Psilocybe Cubensis (cultivated on straw,
indoors) and Psilocybe Semilanceata (collected from their natural
habitat) were found to contain the following amounts (in % of dry
weight) of alkaloids:

Psilocybin Psilocin "total" (1)

PCY-AO-94, caps 0.7 0.4 1.3
PCY-AO-94, stems 0.8 0.2 1.1
PCY-AO-93 1.0 0.4 1.6
PCY-AO-91 0.9 0.1 1.0

Ps.Cub.-91 0.4 0.1 0.5

Ps.S.-93, grade A+ 1.1 - (2) 1.2

These results are in very good agreement with the estimated
relative potencies published in part 1.

All samples had been dried below 30 xC, and stored refrigerated
in airtight containers. Analyses were performed very recently by
Dr. Jochen Gartz - certainly "the" European expert in this field -
at the University of Leipzig. An American edition of Dr. Gartz's
book "Narrenschwaemme", which contains a lot of information not to
be found anywhere else, should be available this spring (3).

(1) After ingestion, psilocybin is hydrolized to psilocin pretty
rapidly and completely. 100 mg of psilocybin (C12H17N2O4P, MW=
284.3) are equivalent to 72 mg of psilocin (C12H16N2O, MW= 204.3),
or - in oth"total" here refers to the (thus calculated, and rounded)
equivalent of psilocybin.


(2) Ps. Semilanceata also contained 0.2 % baeocystin (others only
traces). Baeocystin has effects on humans very similar to those of
psiloc(yb)in, but is weaker (per weight) (J.Gartz, pers. comm.)

(3) and prob from: LUNA, 6160 Packard St., LA, CA-90035-2581

with love (from the planet of gOng)
[/quote]


[More Notes of John W. Allen below[
Now this is from Gartz and me in 1990 and in 1991. It also concerns a letter to me by Paul Stamets written to me In Hawaii around 1984-1985 asking me if I had heard about a new species of Panaeolus, 'Panaeolus azurescens' from along the Oregon Coast. I was very pissed at Jochen Gartz about this whole matter which also related to him selling postcard photos of my images (11 photos and credited with 5) and a calendar with 3 of my images and alledgedly edited by Gartz, Martin Hanselmeir and Paul Stamets. Later Paul told me he was unaware of the calendar until they sent him a freecopy with his name listed as editor.

Gartz also took my two cd-roms that he partialy co-authored as 2nd author, changed the labels with new pictures and listed his name as first author and was selling these in Germany. He also used my Paper on outdoor cultivation fo cyans which he [published in a journal I had a paper in that he wrote in German thinking i would never see this article or the postcards or calendar or his changing my labels and adding his name as first author because he thought I would never come to Europe as I always go to Southeast asia. So here I was in the Nederlands and Switzerland and i see my work being sold.

But the underhanded deal of Psilocybe azurescens was the one that pissed me off the most. Published in an Italian journal that he thought I would never see or find out about when he and Stamets named the species Psilocybe azurescens over the comon name of 16-years of Psilocybe astoriensis. Here is part of that incident which I am in the process of mailing to him, a very angty letter informing him I am removing his name as co author on my bibliography of Entheogenic Fungi as I have in my files a total of 6 pages he contributed in the editing where he wrote some of the titles of his articles in English from German but failed in editing about 40 other German written papers into English. In other words, I gave him 2nd authorship as a coutesty that many colleagues give to one another,.

Of course he contributed a whole chapter and about 30 images to the cultivation history cd-rom, so that was okay. He only contributed about 5 pages to the third world country paper, and has been lying to me generally about specimens he claimed he mailed to Guzman on separate opccasions and Guzman never received those specimens at all. He is the only scholar of about 600 scholars I have, over the past 35-years, corresponded with who by his University at Leipzig is not allowed to have an email due to his almost losing his job in the late 1990s for selling cultures to Amsterdam grow outfits using University facilities and addys to make money for himself. He also has written to me in the last two years, about ten letters where he asks if I had been in jail because he has not heard from me. Accuses me of giving his address to everyone to send him mushroom specimens to be analysed. I had to convince the idiot that if he types his name into any journal publication company he has published with and his name is on the abstracts and papers he writes then anyone can get his address from the paper he wrote where it is always posted'.

Here is part of the angry 20 page letter I am sending him come monday morn about many of these matters,. This pertaining partially to the postcards he sold, the calendar and the naming of P. azurescens.

[quote]

I do not and never have given your name to people to send mushrooms to you and do not appreciate you telling me over and over to stop people I do not even know to stop sending you mushrooms from Mexico and elsewhere.

Now I am going to end this trouble about the stupid post cards and the calendar.

I know Roger Liggenstorfer is not the brightest publisher in the world. It was he who caused Alan Shoemaker problems over the calendar, including not having it published in time to have it on the marker in time for the year to begin., Fred the artist used three of my photos without my permission, but what made me more mad about this calendar is that Paul Stamets, You and Martin Hanselmeier were listed as editors and when I asked Paul Stamets about this matter he told me that he had no idea about this calendar and that no one had any right to put his name as one of the editors because he did not know about it at all.

And the post cards, also from Roger Liggenstorfter. HE used 11 of your photographs and 11 of my photographs. But Roger only listed me as photographer of five photographs. So as far as I am concerned, this was the fault of Roger and his publishing company.

However, If I had not come to Amsterdam, where I was so wrongfully robbed of valuable photographs completely irreplaceable because the negatives were in the photo albums, the lose of passport, two cameras, and very expensive cameras at that, I would never have known that roger was selling those postcards with yours and my photographs on them.

So Roger was making money on yours and my pictures without my permission. I believe you when you told me that this was not your fault.

Now I also have another problem I want to briefly discuss with you about Psilocybe azurescens.

In 1990 or so, you were given some grant money in Germany for me to take you to study mushrooms rooms for several weeks in Washington and Oregon. WE stayed at my friend’s house on Holstein Island in Washington for a week and we picked a pound of blue ringers and P. baeocystis on a McDonald’s lawn off the Black Lake Exit to Tumwater, Washington off of I-5, and picked some Panaeolus subbalteatus and bluing unidentified Gymnopilus species. Then we visited with Paul Stamets whom I introduced you to and he loaned me his slide projector to take to Breittenbush for out slide presentations, and we went to Oregon, first to Hammond and Astoria where we picked some small amounts of P. astoriensis, and I introduced you there to my friend Mark Herke who also collects large annual amounts of P. azurescens. We also picked some liberty caps in Astoria, and my friend Mark then took us to the closed naval hospital which had a large close to an annual 100 pounds or more patch of some Amanita mushrooms, and the he took us to some local parks where we collected some more of P. cyanescens and some P. azurescens (and I will get back to you about this name P. azurescens that made many mushroomers in Oregon and Washington very mad at you and Paul Stamets.. Then we went to Florence for you to meet my friend Gary Menser and we found he was at mushroom conference in Eugene/Springfield, Oregon (This is a twin city). Then we had a Red Robin Good 1/3 pound of cheeseburger at the Valley River Shopping Center Mall across river from Skinners Butte Park in Eugene, Oregon where we then picked a few P. baeocystis and after I introduced you to a nice real good American cheeseburger at the Red Robin restaurant, I suggested to you Jochen, that we should come back in the morning in the day light and look for some mushrooms in the gardens of the shopping mall.

So we find about a 40 or more pound patch of Psilocybe stuntzii growing in parking lot of Bon Marche department store in the mulch around bushes. The Bon Marche is a small department store like Herrads in England only not as expensive,.

The next morning, Thursday we find many P. stuntzii and then we drive to Breittenbush.

Now a few years later, I learn that you and Paul Stamets write taxonomy behind my back with Paul Stamets and you name this mushrooms with a name that no one in Oregon is pleased with, Many collectors in the state who live along the Oregon coast were very unhappy with you making this name of Psilocybe azurescens for this mushroom,. And I will explain why this is bad and dishonest name.

Since 1978 until 1993, especially after the 1883 and 19084 Breittenbush conferences when I and many other people who attend these shows brought several collections from different regions of the Oregon coast.

Every year at Breittenbush mushroom conference, I and other mushroomers who attend each year, this conference, and I have spoken many times at this conference, I also brought Karl L. R. Jansen and Tjakko Stijve there and other famous mycologists who have written field guides to magic mushrooms, including Gary Lincoff (Poisonous and hallucinogenic mushroom Handbook), Everett Kardell Who wrote, Collecting Magic Mushrooms, Richard Hans Norland (What’s in a Mushroom part Three), Bob Harris (Growing Wild Mushrooms) and others. And at these shows we all had applied this species with the local name of Psilocybe astoriensis. Even my friend I introduced you to in Astoria, Mark Herke (in 1990 and 1991) referred it to you as P. astoriensis for the city it was both discovered and collected in, along at the same time as people were collecting it in Hammond, Oregon which is connected to the same sand dunes as it is in Astoria. So you knew this name of the species was in use for many years, before you and Paul Stamets wrote the article in the same Issue of Eleusis that you wrote of the taxonomy of Psilocybe natalensis from Africa. You would never come to Thailand with me because you said your doctor said it was too hot for you. Yet you made trips to areas of Africa that are hotter than Thailand.

And every year for more than 12 years, everyone who brought fresh specimens of this mushroom to the mushroom show in eastern Oregon to Breittenbush hot springs always called it Psilocybe astoriensis. And so did hundreds of mushroom lovers and pickers in Oregon and the Oregon coast to Eugene, called it P. astoriensis. And when You came there with me and I brought you to America to lecture which was your first trip ever form behind the Iron Curtain after the Wall fell down, then I also find that you came to the PNE on three more trips but never let me know you had came and you sent top visit the people I introduced you to and did not tell me about these visits which my friends told me that you came.

Attached Thumbnails

  • wild_mushrooms_1984.jpg
  • wild_mushrooms_1984.jpg

Edited by Mrs.Hippie3, 12 March 2010 - 09:54 PM.

  • freek likes this

#8 JoeActionhero

JoeActionhero

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 7 posts

Posted 15 January 2010 - 05:38 PM

I think you'll find much better results propagating with vigorous wood-chip spawn that with spores. Liq. culture spore prop. was tried on this island in the past with very disappointing results.

Just toss the chips where they'll enjoy growing... not bark chips, not lawns, etc....... Lately I've found piles of chips where beaver are gnawing on trees. Dig chips in, let Mr. Beaver track 'em back home into the lodge... a veritable time-capsule of cyans to fruit when the lodge collapses, the pond turns to marsh and the trees fall and splinter in wind storms.

Nyah Ha Ha!!!!

#9 JoeActionhero

JoeActionhero

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 7 posts

Posted 15 January 2010 - 05:43 PM

OMG! MJShroomer!!!!
Superb info! It's all off to the printer (here at our wee public library) and I'll savour it all this night long.

YOU DA" MAN!!!!

RIP Hippie 3. Long Live MJS!

#10 mjshroomer

mjshroomer

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 2,323 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 16 January 2010 - 04:20 PM

OMG! MJShroomer!!!!
Superb info! It's all off to the printer (here at our wee public library) and I'll savour it all this night long.

YOU DA" MAN!!!!

RIP Hippie 3. Long Live MJS!



My eyes, due to diabetes were burned out to the max after losing a page when the time constraint on the thread locked. So when i came back I was unable to correct the typos in the last part of the paper.

AS soon as issue IX is published with the 148-page pape on fungi of SE Asia and Gartz, chemical analysis is published, then I am removing his name from my bibliography. Later I intend to publish about 600 letters and there are several dozen from Dr. Tjakko Stijve who warms me about Jochen Gartz and that I should cut all ties with him. HE apparently has had many prblems with European shroom experts in the past and amateurs as well.


In a week I want to post the story of how [redacted] of Lis publications iN Los angeles ripped him off when she printed a real shitty press run of Magic mushrooms around the world, the English version of Narrenschwamme. She showed him a press release copy and then the one she had printed had the shittiest reproduction of dul colored photos. I have all four copies of the book for the original, the press copy in English, the English and then the nice new German edition wioth mostly good photo reproduction. She had him put jup all the money for cost and printing and then sold all the copies and kept the money as her payment for doing the book and feeding her 200 pound ten year old daughter. She lied to Gartz telling him that Homestead books co., iin Seattle never asked about her book but David Tatelman of Homestead, the publisher gave me a xerox of her letter to him and from him inquiring about selling 500 copies to homestead. Then when she heard someone named John Allen was talking bad about her she threatened me with court action for libel saying she never heard from Homestead at all. She claimed in a private letter to Gartz that he gave me a copy of that she had never any contact

This is a not so good copy of an original letter from her to homestead. I have no idea in my files where here original five pages of correspondence are but someday I will find them and post them as she was a thief as well.

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1263676806


Sorry I could not find a better copy of her shit lie.
mjshroomer

Attached Thumbnails

  • Claudia_Taake_Homestead_Bk_Co-1996-2abc.jpg
  • Claudia_Taake_Homestead_Bk_Co-1996-2abc.jpg


#11 mjshroomer

mjshroomer

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 2,323 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 20 January 2010 - 01:07 PM

Okay, searching through some files this morning around 5:30 am, (I am getting arthretic finger cramps at the moment), I came across a lot of letters from Gartz with his griping about Dr. Tjakko Stijve not citing his research papers except the one Stijve wrote on the mistaken chemical analysis of six European species of mushrooms that Gartz analysed and said were psilocybian and then Stijve analysed the same collectrions from the same herbariums and showed they were not psilocybine containing mushrooms.

As I previously noted above, Dr. Tjakko Stijve of Nestles, for almost 35 years is a specialist in finding trace elements such as arsenic and radio-selsium isotopes in fungi, especially in fungi found in Scandinavia 9 years after Chernobyl. The content of the radio-selsium isotopes were in the range of 150,000 to 250,000 bg's per kilogram when the actual content after nine years should have been in the 1250 bg's per kilogram range.

Additionally, Dr. Stijve, one of Nesltes top biochemists has also on 2 occasions eaten psilocybin mushrooms with mild rewarding experience, explaining to me that they were okay but not for him to do a lot. He also once told me when we lectured at Breittenbush that he had smoked some ganja once but it made him paranoid. And for years, Dr. Stijve had warned me not to trust Jochen Gartz. A lesson I really should have heeded.

Gartz writes me that he does not believe Dr. Stijve ate the mushrooms.

Dr. Stijve has also written about a dozen papers on Psilocybian mushrooms and many on medicinal shrooms such as Agaricus blazeii, etc.

Anyway, I noted about the situation with Gartz over the naming of this mushrooms that was for 13-16-years in Oregon known locally throughout the western portion of the state from Eugene along I-5 to the coastline and north to Kelso and the coastline there in Washington.

I am going to post a letter written to me by Gartz in December of 1990, 11 months before I brought him to America to lecture at Breittenbush Hot Springs Annual mushroom Show. I also bring this up because he published a few papers, one about cold weather mushrooms in a journal I published and article in with Mark Merlin and Gartz, wrote his in German on how to grow cold weather mushrooms, mainly discussing P. stuntzii and P. cyanescens. He also discussed libertly caps which are hard to grow in vitro which is why no one does, but in this paper he does not mention the name P. astoriensis or the fact that all of his information came from me about how to transfer the mycelia to similar decayed wood habitats. However, he does note the famous Steer-Co wood chips that I always post about on the internet as a source in public gardens, parks, restaurents, etc in his paper on cold weather shrooms.

I am also going to post the 9-page paper by Stamets and Gartz on their naming this species as P. azurescens because of the bluing and for the name of Paul's son Azureus.

i bring this up because in the acknowledgments, Gartz mentions two people, Paxton Hoag, and my friend Mark Herke, to whom I introduced him to in 1991 when Gartz got a grant to pay me to take him shrooming for three weeks in Washington and Oregon and to meet my friends, including Paul Stamets at his house, then to Astoria and introduced him to Mark Herke who share with us patches of P. astoriensis, as I and Mark's friends also referred to them in October of 1991 when we went shrooming in Astoria and Hammond, Oregon and explained the name to gartz.

Gartz, Mark and I and his Friend Hoad also picked liberty caps in a pasture I knew of, and we picked both P. cyanescens and P. astoriensis in a park together and at a few places in the Sand Dunes I knew about. Mark also showed us a lawn with an oak tree in the center and a giant ferry ring, to big to capture on film at the time. I have some partial images in scrawney grass.

In his acknowledgments for his article with Paul in the the journal, Integration vol. 6 - 1995, Gartz wrote that, "Paxton Hoag and Mark Herke are credited for first collecing Psilocybe azurescens."

This is not true as I note above, Oregonian shroomers were bringing collections of this species to the Breittenbush Hot Springs Annual mushroom show as early as Mycomedia 4 in 1983. Then Gartz continues in the Acknowledgments by adding his thanks to "Azureus Stamets for his assitance in the field."

That was on a trip sometime between 1992-1994 when Gartz came to visit Stamets and did not inform me that he had come twice to America. He deserved being ripped off for all his money by [redacted], for "Magic Mushrooms around the World." His karma coming back to him for being sneaky

Finally at the end of the Acknowledgment, he contiues by adding my name, "John Allen and Eirc Iselman helpd in Field collections." Yeah, 2-3 years before he wrote his paper naming the shroom azurescens, Later i intend to post about 25 of his paranoia letters how it is not safe to talk of mushrooms in Germany when the biggest publisher of drug books works out of Germany. Gartz even warns me not to trust mycologists from West Germany because they are richer people and have attitudes towards researchers in Eastern Germany who were poorer people because of the Russian domination of the east of Berlin and the Wall. And Gartz had and still his a constant fear that everyone who has email is being spied on by the German Police. HE is the only professional scholar who has no email number at all. Probably the University made it clear he could not have one after whatever trouble he won't share with me that he got into in the late 1990s. When I got robbed in Amsterdam in 1998, Dr. STijve told me that Gartz had gotten into some serious trouble with the U of Leipzig over his selling cultures to people in Amsterdam and other parts of the nederlands and Europe, and using University mail to ship and email to discuss whatever it was he got caught doing. He writes me letters telling me he needs nop police in his life because he soon wants to retire with all his pensions and no police trouble. He was originally a chemist who developed explosives and even wrote a book on them and another on socialism in Germany.

Anyway, here first is his letter. in December of 1990, 11 months before I brought him for his first visit outside the Iron Curtain to America. Then of course, he sneaks back into the country and hangs with my friends and one of them told me to not mention that he had visited them because he felt I would be mad.

I imagine I blew his mind when I saw my two cd-roms on the internet search enjine with different covers than what I published them on and with his name as first author. A week later he changed the names back but then I had to get on his case to correct the original cover because I paid 200 dollars to the artist for the Bibliography Indian styled art cover.
So here is the letter, and then the 1995, the year before Stamets published "Psilocybin Mushrooms of the World." And again, in 1989 or so Paul inquired about if I had heard of a mushroom called Panaeolus azurescens, so that told me Paul knew nothing about it at the time since he lives in Shelton, Washington near Tumwater and Olympia, although he had assuredly seen it on display when he lectured at breittenbush.

The article is 8 pages in the journal but the size is 9 x 12 inches so I had to make 30 separate images to be able to post it so I hope this does not run out of time before I can get them all in. Remember to read his the Acknowledgments in the Integration article. I will post the Eleusis Cold Weather cult article in the forum international at a later date.

Letter to John W. Allen from Dr. Jochen Gartz, Univ. of Leipzig, Germany, Dec 19, 1990. 11 months before he picked fresh specimens of P. astoriensis, showing his recieval of specimens from me before coming to America and then omiting them after he came back so I would not know.

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264009575

A New Caerulescent Psilocybe from the Pacific Coast of Northwestern America (Sent to the journal in September 1994, publish in the summer of 1995).

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264009580

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264009580

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264009580

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264009580

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264009580

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264009580

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264009580

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264009580

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264009580

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010108

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010108

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010108

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010108

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010108

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010108

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010108

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010108


P. azurescens
http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010108

P. azurescens

P. cyanofibrilosa (mis identified by Stamets, and told so over the past 20 years), even Alan Rockerfeller had to explain it to Paul in San Francisco, but it is in David Arora's book and printing cost to much to change the text. Even Paul's mushroom cultivator has quite a few mistakes which have never been fixed due to expensive costs of changing the type and text.
http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010108

P. cyanescens as picked by Guzman to represent the species of Psilocybe cyanescens/
http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010619

Psilocybe baeocystis by paul Stamets.

I should note that Gartz did not tale a single photograph in this article of the six images presented./
http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010619

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010619

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010619

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010619

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010619

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010619

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010619

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1264010619


mjshroomer

See below for some actual photos taken when I was with Gartz collecting P. astoriensis in October of 1991

Attached Thumbnails

  • pazurestametsgartz1995-28.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-29-figs.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-26.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-27.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-25.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-24.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-23.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-22.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-20-pic5.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-21-pic6.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-19-pic4.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-17-pic1a.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-18-pic2.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-16.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-15.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-14.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-12.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-13.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-11.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-9.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-10.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-8.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-7.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-5.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-6.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-3.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-2.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-4.jpg
  • pazurestametsgartz1995-1.jpg
  • Gartz_astoriensis12-19-1990abc.jpg


#12 mjshroomer

mjshroomer

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 2,323 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 20 January 2010 - 01:50 PM

One more error by Gartz in the above paper.,

He notes that he collected specimens in Tillamock and Astoria, Oregon in October of 1990 and deposited them in the Herbarium of the University of Leipzig, yet he did not come to America until October of 1991 when he came to go shroom hunting with me. I also later found out that he was given $2000.00 grant from the German Scientific Foundation yet only paid me $400.00. According to that foundation, I was suppose to get half of that amount for my time and services.

And then his I cannot go to Thailand because it is to hot yet he spent several months in africa in search of shrooms when he discovered P natalensis. His co-author two years later collected massive abundant collections of specimens more than 200 km from the site where Gartz only found a few growing. That person was Michael Smith of the Unierstity of Natal in Pretoria. The same man who discovered three varieties of edible seaweed off the coast of Madagascar that contained high levels of 5-meo-dmt.

Interestingly, in the 1970s, I made jokes about how people get grants to study shit like the size of a screw of how to improve the point of a pin. SO I suggested how about I apply for a grant to collect hallucinogenic algae. Hm. Someone actually did, Michael Smith in Seaweed.

I was actually thinking of underwater sea urchins or star fish, there are a few fish that have hallucinogenic mind-altering qualities to them/

More on the Gartz (Magic Mushrooms Around the World.

The Original book, in green ugly cover as Jonathan Ott wrote in his review of the book in the Journal of ethnobiology, is titles Narrenschwamme which means 'foolish mushroom.' but on the cover it says psychotrope pilze in Europa. meaning hallucinogenic mushrooms of Europe, but he covers 7 chapters on five continents, and everything in the section on Hawaii, and the Australian/New Zealand and the chapter on Southeast Asia are almost word for word from my published papers.

I first wrote Paul that Gartz and I were interested in doing a pictorial of large 9 x 12 photos of Psilocybe species from all over the world. Then in 1994 and 1995, Gartz writes Narrenschwamme and translates by a woman he calls the East LA Witch. I have that one with his signature also, and then one year later, Paul's Psilocybin Mushrooms of the World, which has at least 15 mushrooms featured in the book which contain no active ingredients at all.

Okay, so much for todays lesson in how people cheat others of good ideas.

Lucky my journal is so expensive, the 25 copies sold out so I will print an extra ten to cover the ones I owe people for their imput, and then Psychedelic Salon Quarterly, a new journal is going to run my article, in black and white photos, "Sex, Mushrooms, and Rock and Roll," and luckilly for me, Purdue University just ordered a copy for their library.

Soon Stijve is writing two reviews for my journal and two for the bibliography, aimed only at the university library circuits across America and the world. I have been waiting for that for years.

And I am going to try to get a Government grant for Issue ix of my journal with my 148-page paper with over 200 photos and two other articles, one on Papua New Guinea Psilocybes and another on Fiji cultivated cubes.

mjshroomer

#13 mjshroomer

mjshroomer

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 2,323 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 03 January 2017 - 12:20 AM

From what I've heard, all our cyans seem to be descended from the original ones found in Kew Gardens, London in 1948. Enthusiasts are responsible for it haveing naturalized to wood-chips and spreading throughout the northern hemisphere.

But it's speculated that it's original habitat was, like the Columbia River p. Azurescens at Astoria, in sand dunes, seagrass, and driftwood. They have taken to such a setting here on Pender Island, BC (with a bit of help from the Beneficient Myco-Spreading Human, me!).

Under seagrass the driftwood and especially the styrofoam flotsam chips and particulizes into an incredible growth medium. Very airy. Do give this a try with colonized mulch from your found patches if you live close to an estruary! Cyan's are salt tolerant, too, so the tides will spread our friends far and wide.

Handfuls of mulch tossed into running streams also insure wide dispersal. Enough for all for ever and ever! GO BABY, GO!

 

HI, mushroom john here,  The idea that all Psilocybe cyanescens species around the northern hemisphere of much of the had allegedly originated from Alexandra Wakefield's specimens she collected in the Kew Gardens in Surrey, England in the late 1940s is untrue.

 

It was 1st botanically identified from Kew Gardens.   

 

Psilocybe cyanescens is a cold weather northern hemisphere species which is rare and only in small quantities in it's natural habitat where hard wood trees grow.  It is primarily a wood-debris consuming fungi that feeds on  the decomposed rotted wood that is from one to three years after dying.

 

Psilocybe cyanescens is reported throughout Europe.  Here is a photo from my colleague Dr. Tjakko Stijve, once for over 40 years, the now retired head chemist of Nestles. He is also one who has taken the voyage of the shrooms and studied them and their properties at Nestles for quite a long time.

 

The article from a journal in French about one found in Vevey, Suisse (by Lake Geneva).  The 2nd image is the note Tjakko put inside to give me the issue number of the journal and that he used one of my photos for the article.  I was only able to translate a little of the French.  I can read French, Spanish, and Italian. I get about every 3 words out of 7-8, enough to understand the crux of the conversation.  It helps because of my knowledge of simple Latin.

 

Images one: Cyans in Switzerland.

 

cyans_in_Swiss1_stijve.jpg

 

Image 2:  Note from Dr. Tjakko Stijve to me re: the article.  Journal is in three language editions.

 

It is in Finland, The Baltics, Russian and to China in the Northern regions.

 

While my 1990 article on Magic Mushrooms of Australia and New Zealand listed it in Australia.  That was an error. There are three to four species in Australia which are similar to Psilocybe cyanescens, and those also have a wavy cap at times, pure white stem and in man made environments, they too grow extremely well.

 

The error regarding P. cyanescens in Australia came about by me in error.  While both studying the various literature on Animal Husbandry, on environments and habitats of fungi,  a specific paper on the comparative analysis of several Australian species with that of P. cubensis and/or others.  They studied specimens were Psilocybe eucalypta, Psilocybe tasmaniana, Psilocybe australiana And Psilocybe subaeruginosa.  They were chemically studied with that of P. cyanescens.  In small letters it lists a citation and it was that the studied specimens of P. cyanescens were from the UK  Most likely from Kew Gardens.  Even when this studies were conducted, Roy eventually would become the curator for the Royal Botanic Gardens in Edinburgh, Scotland,.

 

So Cyans love man made habitats.  And about the UK,  there is the news item posted at my site about the race track laid out with wood chips of hard woods and possibly as  many as 100,000 Psilocybe cyanescens.  Here is the article for you to read. Now this is a big patch we are speaking of, one like no one has seen except the people involved and the Mycologist who Identified them.  I do not know how to get rid of the red.   

 

The Guardian Unlimited

Wednesday, January 3, 2001

Magic mushrooms thrive as weeds wane
by
Paul Brown, environment correspondent
Guardian Unlimited
Wednesday January 3, 2001

 

Hippies would have thought they were hallucinating. The horses would have failed a dope test. Geoffrey Kibb was amazed but stone cold sober and knew a scientific phenomenon when he saw one.

Mr Kibb discovered the holy grail of the 1960s hippie culture, the most potent magic mushrooms known to science, growing in a vast carpet on a racetrack in the south of England. He estimated there were 100,000 of them, enough to blow the mind of an entire town.

He reported his findings to fellow researcher Peter Shaw, an expert in fungi. To him the field of wavy-capped magic mushroom (Psilocybe cyanes-cens) was confirmation of an astonishing colonisation of Britain by exotic species of mushroom - an invasion innocently caused by gardeners anxious to keep weeds at bay.

Dr Shaw says that by spreading wood chips over the ground gardeners create the perfect habitat for fungi of all sorts. The wavy-capped magic mushroom, "a particularly aggressive species" and a native of the Pacific north-west of America, is now firmly established in gardens, parks and any other place where wood chips are used for weed control.

About 10 species of mushroom are eaten for their hallucinogenic qualities. Psilocybe cyanescens is identified by its wavy cap, purple brown spore print and rapid blueing of stem and cap on bruising, although there are poisonous species of similar appearance.

The blueing reflects the high psilocin/psilocybin content of the fungus (which as any old hippie will tell you is the bit that makes you fly). Dr Shaw is presenting his findings today at the British Ecological Society meeting in Birmingham where he is inviting amateur mycologists to hunt down other rare species.

On his way to work at the University of Surrey Dr Shaw passes a roundabout in Leatherhead. "The roundabout was mulched in 1999 and in May 2000 a flush of creamy-yellow fungi came up."

They turned out to be four different exotic varieties growing in the wood chips - one of which, Agrocybe putaminium, had only been recorded once before in Britain, at Kew gardens. "The wood chips were bought from a commercial supplier in Essex, but how they acquired their strange fungal flora is still unclear."

The bad news for magic mushroom hunters - deliberate growing of magic mushrooms for use is illegal but mere possession is not - is that this is not the time of year for fruiting.

But out of sight the roots from which they grow are spreading rapidly. Dr Shaw's theory is that suppliers keep vast heaps of wood chips in nurseries, allowing aggressive fungi to colonise..

Wood chips and bark chips make a better habitat than the original decaying wood on which the fungi grow. This is because the root structure does not have to force its way through a hard surface but glides between the chips.

Because of his Leatherhead experience and other discoveries Dr Shaw says there are bound to be exotic species not thought to exist in Britain growing happily in gardens, and some have already transferred to the wild - the magic mushroom has been been found growing on trees in Burnham Beeches, Buckinghamshire. "  

 

I do not know how to get rid of the red color.  Part one of two coming later as I spent too long tonight looking this up to make sure I knew what I was talking about.

 

So cyans are in most northern hemispheres. 

 

mjshroomer/man of knowledge.

Attached Thumbnails

  • cyans_in_Swiss2_stijve.jpg


#14 mjshroomer

mjshroomer

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 2,323 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 03 January 2017 - 12:24 AM

Here is the follow up account in another publication on the race track's large cyan patch published three days after the above report..  It is a shame there were no photos to go with this story.   Weird, now this one had no red ink.

 

 

"Telegraph.co.uk

19-6-2001.

Wood chips blamed for invasion of alien fungi

By Roger Highfield, Science Editor
Last Updated: 3:56pm BST 19/06/2001.

 

'Magic': Psilocybe cyansecens

 

The increasing use of wood chippings by gardeners to control weeds has created a new habitat that attracts alien fungi. Dr Peter Shaw, of the University of Surrey, will tell the British Ecological Society today that he believes the aliens arrived in plant material destined for Kew Gardens, where they colonised wood chip beds, then made their way into Britain's wood chip supply system.

Although some species remain confined to wood chips, others, such as the wavy-capped magic mushroom, Psilocybe cyansecens, are spreading to natural habitats.

Last year Dr Shaw saw a flush of creamy-yellow fungi including Psilocybe percivalii, another magic mushroom, and a native North American species, Agrocybe putaminium, which has only been recorded once before in Britain, on a roundabout. He says: "The wood chips were bought from a commercial supplier in Essex, but how they acquired their strange fungal flora is still unclear."

Britain is likely to be invaded by a killer shrimp, according to Dr Jaimie Dick of Queen's University, Belfast. He will tell the meeting at Birmingham University that the voracious Dikerogammarus villosus, originating in the former Soviet Union, has already invaded Holland and driven out the native species because it breeds rapidly, can tolerate environmental change, and is not fussy about what it eats."

 

    ."






Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!