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#41 chrisbossjake

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 09:05 PM

The humidifier is the one I am using for my fruiting chamber and it works quite well since the ultrasonic disc is what is adjusted and not the fan.

I really would like to have the external pump.
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#42 wildedibles

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 08:40 AM

Thanks those 1st 4 pumps are the types I have but not really knowing what they are maybe I can match the out put to the ones listed
mine never came in a box like that since I found them usually in the water fall thingy already ....
but I think they might be different out puts like the ones you have posted pictures of

The new one I just found was in a big waterfall thingy floor model it is ruffly a few feet tall maybe 3 feet
and the other ones I had b4 are small desk top waterfalls so I am thinking this new pump might be more powerful
I am going to see if I can read anything on the pumps and compare
thanks for the idea
I really want to start up an Aquaponic set up again b4 starting my veggies for outdoors again cause the tomatoes I started last year in my system were amazing in the garden getting that perfect head start ;)
Thanks again for your help ;)

ok looked at the bigger pump found it online too it says its high powered desk pump
pt-606lb and has adjustable flow

I will take some pictures later have to find a screw driver to take this water fall apart

it is about 3 feet tall or just under that so it might have enough power to pump the water higher than what I have anyway :)

Edited by wildedibles, 03 January 2013 - 09:14 AM.


#43 chrisbossjake

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:31 PM

I wonder if you step down to a smaller diameter tube if you will be able to increase the head height. I think what restricts the head height is the weight of the water in tube and if you have a reasonably smaller tube then there will be less water weight. This is just a theory/idea, maybe it will allow you to lift water higher maybe not.

If I ever get around to making a bell syphon for my setup I am going to upgrade my main pump to a larger submersible so, I might willing to donate a pump if you would like.

#44 microscopeman

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 12:43 AM

How much does it cost to grow your own food indoors compared to buying at the store? If someone can come up with a cost effective approach I'm game
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#45 wildturtle

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 01:14 AM

These guys are very inspirational and advancing on their cost effective approach to aquaponics. Of course you would have to have some sort of upfront funding and man power to build an operation this big that runs smoothly. I am sure if it is scaled down it can still feed a family of 4 year round but time spent is money as well. I guess the cost difference between going aquaponic only vs traditional store bought and the effectiveness of doing one over the other depends on how much you spend on building your system and food at the store. If you buy the most expensive groceries vs. buying the cheapest available skews the cost efficiency. Also how you view the worth of your time may differ giving someone less of a reason to do it than others. But if you make money anyway you might as well spend it to get it to the level of efficiency necessary to function applicably and hire someone to work it for your family. Or have a group of families equally throw down together and get a good sized indoor op going to feed all the families involved all year round! Million pounds on 3 acres of food sounds good to me!

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#46 wildedibles

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 06:54 AM

How much does it cost to grow your own food indoors compared to buying at the store? If someone can come up with a cost effective approach I'm game


:) It can cost a lot or it can cost nothing really there is such a range it is hard to pin point on how much it will cost

think of it this way how much do you pay for Organic produce? :)

I try and garden for practally free that is my goal always when I grow food or flowers for that matter

A friend of mine has a great garden all summer long and he loves it but he says he did the math it costs him more to grow it then what he can buy it for in the store now he didnt factor in Organic prices
and he buys his poop by the bag and also pays a gardener and buys plants already started ... so it can cost a lot to grow

when I discussed this with him and told him that my cost was way down compared to the store and that I didnt buy veggies all summer long I usually do not have enough to store for the winter as my yeilds are lower than his ( I also have a smaller garden )
He understands now that starting your own seeds that you saved from last years grow like I do will cut the cost by a lot more than half cause I really do not buy a lot of plants or seeds but he doesnt have the time or patients to start seeds

Last year I started some cucumber for them :) they couldnt find the plants they wanted to grow so I gave them the plants I started and they were happy with the results nice big cucumbers they shared the cucumbers with me they were nice and yummy and you betcha I saved some seeds out of the matured ones and have some to start in the spring :)

Another big tip I let a few Parsnips grow for 2 years and now the same with carrots :)
I do this cause these plants will flower and seed the 2nd year and then I can collect the seeds b4 they fall :) now none of my gardening friends need to buy carrot seeds or parsnip seeds

His gardener friend that helps this guy plant was really upset cause they went to check on the garden after a few weeks and all their beans went to seed they couldnt get out there sooner to check them and was really really upset that they lost 90% of their beans cause they were too old to eat :) I smiled really big and said now you do not need to buy bean seeds next year she laughed and I helped her with the basket full of beans to save what we could for food and the rest for next years seeds :)

Edited by wildedibles, 04 January 2013 - 07:01 AM.


#47 wildedibles

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 07:07 AM

I wonder if you step down to a smaller diameter tube if you will be able to increase the head height. I think what restricts the head height is the weight of the water in tube and if you have a reasonably smaller tube then there will be less water weight. This is just a theory/idea, maybe it will allow you to lift water higher maybe not.

If I ever get around to making a bell syphon for my setup I am going to upgrade my main pump to a larger submersible so, I might willing to donate a pump if you would like.


I will try that idea Hubby took the water fall thing apart for me so now all I need is a bucket of water to try it with and make a big mess lol jk lol
with all the supplies I have collected in the last little bit I think I seen an adapter to fit and make the hose smaller I will try that idea out Thanks

and thanks for the offer I will test this out tho think it is what I have been looking for see what kind of plans I can come up with I will keep you filled in on the progress :)

#48 wildedibles

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 08:22 PM

I keep looking at these clay pots I have they are tiny but have a whole seedling tray of them I really want to work them into the system but cannot fill in the details then I think of this thread and think and then do something else and forget about it lol
I could have the water drip into the tray and run out on a slant but I dont know want to hang stuff too well have a few different pumps now...
humm...
just throwing ideas out there
I know clay adds ph+ that might come in handy ph usually drops i think havent checked the fish tank in a bit maybe that help me come up with ideas
then what am i going to use as substrate

Hows your veggies :) keep thinking about this thread it really inspires me to get using my tank for growing food again :)
I seen that I have duck weed starting to grow well I only had a few plants of it now have about 10-20 :) free fish food starting :) my tropical fish do not like it as much as gold fishy's do this could be a great summer food for the fish in the barrel to keep the mosquito population down ;)

#49 Arathu

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:24 PM

I've collected 12 food grade barrels, a solar panel, a deep cycle battery, an 800GPH submersible pump, plus a ton of pvc pipes........this is definitely happening this season outdoors and inside. I'm building a rocket mass stove too.......... Nice work man!

#50 caitojones

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:36 PM

I recently set up a passive (no pump) aquaponic setup using all recycled materials. It's not far enough along to show any conclusive results, but it seems to be working alright with my test plant. My crawfish love the setup too. I'll get some pics up after it's further along.

#51 cujoloki

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 01:24 AM

I recently set up a passive (no pump) aquaponic setup using all recycled materials. It's not far enough along to show any conclusive results, but it seems to be working alright with my test plant. My crawfish love the setup too. I'll get some pics up after it's further along.


Dying to see your setup. Concrete my chair here.

#52 kcmoxtractor

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 10:18 AM

you can put worms in the gravel beds to help with pH also, and every now and then scrape the fish
tank of all its sediment and put it into the bed for the worms to chow on. ive read greensand supposedly
helps with 2 things- iron deficiency and flowering plants get enough potassium to really kick out some
fruit. i am preparing to take on an aquaponics venture myself, just have to work out the details more.
an old no longer working hot tub for a fish tank, and i will use corrugated drain pipe for the lettuces
(holds 1200 at a time) and 50 gallon rubbermaid stock tanks for the tomatoes and cucumbers.

is the side with the raft aerated like a DWC?

#53 neo Figment

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 11:56 AM

I have never had a problem with my ph being to high....Usually it is a battle the other way.
Do you have any limestone in your gravel?
If you don't have something that is activley raising you ph as your system
matures it should start going the other way.

I never could find chelated(sp?) iron like the aussies talk about. I suffered from
Iron deficiency till I started supplementing with bloodmeal.

#54 chrisbossjake

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 01:17 AM

you can put worms in the gravel beds to help with pH also, and every now and then scrape the fish
tank of all its sediment and put it into the bed for the worms to chow on. ive read greensand supposedly
helps with 2 things- iron deficiency and flowering plants get enough potassium to really kick out some
fruit. i am preparing to take on an aquaponics venture myself, just have to work out the details more.
an old no longer working hot tub for a fish tank, and i will use corrugated drain pipe for the lettuces
(holds 1200 at a time) and 50 gallon rubbermaid stock tanks for the tomatoes and cucumbers.

is the side with the raft aerated like a DWC?



I have a couple dozen worms in the upper bed. About a dozen are the blood worms and 2-3 dozen nightcrawlers. (2 dozen I bought and the other popped up when the hot tub began leaking)

Where could I find this "greensand"?

Sure is, I have 4 of the tubular foam like bubblers.

I have found Chelated Iron (IIRC it had other micros in there also) in a local farm store in the garden section.


Also, I have some updates. The pepper plants are flowering/fruiting finally. However, the plants themselves are only 2 inches tall. The tomato plants have started to take off again since I have a heater in my garage and I have been doing a bunch of work on my car lately. I am guessing this might be from the increased CO2 and the additional heat. They have started to grow new branches that have began to recently kick out some flowers.

Unfortunatly, Im not sure how long Im going keep these going indoors. If I can get a greenhouse erected this spring I may toss the fish in a pond inside the greenhouse and maybe trying strawberries again. Im just not looking forward to digging a deep enough pond to keep it from freezing completely in the dead of winter, but I suppose a heater would help with that and Im sure the plants would do better with warmer water than nearly freezing water.

#55 kcmoxtractor

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 10:14 AM

i found greensand at a garden supply store/nursery. you can always call around and see if they carry it.

#56 riseabovethought

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 03:14 PM

Great post!  Thank you!


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#57 riseabovethought

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 03:15 PM

Check this one out phoenix-
http://mycotopia.net...ggies-fish.html

 

That link dont work brother...in case you can fix?  I'd love to see what you're referring to.  I love this stuff!! 



#58 kcmoxtractor

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 03:42 PM

 

Check this one out phoenix-
http://mycotopia.net...ggies-fish.html

 

That link dont work brother...in case you can fix?  I'd love to see what you're referring to.  I love this stuff!! 

 

updated the link



#59 riseabovethought

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Posted 26 October 2015 - 10:59 AM

More Aquaponics 

 

The next food revolution: fish farming?

Aquaculture is the fastest-growing food sector in the world. Some see it as the best hope to feed an increasingly over-populated planet.

 

Sanggou Bay looks like a place where the pointillism movement has been unleashed on an ocean canvas. All across the harbor on China’s northeastern coast, thousands of tiny buoys – appearing as black dots – stretch across the briny landscape in unending rows and swirling patterns. They are broken only by small boats hauling an armada of rafts through the murky waters. 

 

For centuries, Chinese fishermen have harvested this section of the Yellow Sea for its flounder, herring, and other species. Today the area is again producing a seafood bounty, though not from the end of a fisherman’s rod or the bottom of a trawler’s net. Instead, the maze of buoys marks thousands of underwater pens or polyurethane ropes that hold oysters, scallops, abalone, Japanese flounder, mussels, sea cucumbers, kelp, and garish orange sea squirts. They are all part of one of the world’s biggest and most productive aquaculture fields. Sanggou Bay is a seafood buffet on a colossal scale. 

The buoys here extend for miles out to the horizon, offering, on an aluminum-gray day, the only clue to where the ocean stops and the sky begins. Hundreds of migrant workers – many from as far away as Myanmar (Burma) – pilot the fishing boats zigzagging around the floats, shuttling fish to shore, checking the lines for mussels and oysters, and voyaging farther out to sea to harvest seaweed. 

 

“The bay is packed,” says Bian Dapeng, director of research and development for Xunshan Group, a state-owned Chinese conglomerate that controls much of the bay, as he looks out at the harbor from a rocky overlook. “Someday we’ll go even farther out.”

The transformation of Sanggou Bay from a struggling fishing port to an aquaculture leviathan symbolizes what may become one of the big food stories of the 21st century. 

Aquaculture is the fastest-growing food-producing sector in the world – and China is a big reason why. The country has tripled its fish production over the past 20 years, making it the top producer, exporter, and consumer of seafood. China now contributes more than one-third of the global supply; 72 percent of its total seafood output comes from aquaculture. 

 

Technavio, a global market-research company, predicts that China’s aquaculture industry will reach $100 billion – the size of the most recent Greek bailout – within the next four years, up from $66 billion in 2012. It’s expected to account for 38 percent of all fish for human consumption by 2030.  

China’s dominance in aquaculture makes it inextricably linked to the industry’s future. Ling Cao, a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University’s Center on Food Security and the Environment in California, says that how China develops its aquaculture sector will dramatically affect the availability of seafood across the globe. 

 

“China has the power and influence in aquaculture,” she says. “It’s the 800-pound gorilla in this field.” 

And aquaculture is no small field. Farmed seafood exceeded global beef production for the first time in 2011 and now provides about half of all fish consumed by humans. Population growth and an emerging global middle class have fueled an insatiable demand for seafood over the past half century. More people are eating more fish than ever before, leading annual consumption to double since the 1960s. With the global catch of wild fish stagnant, experts say, nearly all new seafood will have to be farmed. 

 

Fortunately there appears to be plenty of room for aquaculture to grow. Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet but provide less than 2 percent of food for human consumption. 

 

Aquaculture’s unrealized potential has led some scientists, economists, and policymakers to endorse it as one of our best options for feeding the world’s burgeoning population, which is expected to increase from 7 billion to 9 billion people by 2050. The challenge will be to do it as efficiently and sustainably as possible – while overcoming some of the nagging problems that have plagued fish farming in the past.

 

“I don’t know that anyone has a clear idea of aquaculture’s ultimate potential – it’s enormous,” says Hauke Kite-Powell, a research specialist at the Marine Policy Center of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. “We don’t have to come anywhere near using all of it to feed the projected world population over the course of this century.”

•     •     •

 

The benefits of aquaculture are abundant. Rich in protein and healthy omega-3 fatty acids, fish are among the most nutritional foods in the world. They’re also among the most energy-efficient to grow. Roughly a pound of feed produces a pound of fish, while it takes nearly two pounds of feed to get a pound of chicken and seven pounds to get a pound of beef. What’s more, aquaculture’s carbon footprint is often a fraction of that of farming on land.

 

“Wake up,” says Christophe Béné, a senior policy expert at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, who specializes in aquaculture. “You have scientists who have spent billions of dollars on trying to make potatoes richer in particular nutrients. Why spend thousands of millions of dollars when we have existing commodities that can do the trick?”

 

Yet aquaculture comes with a host of problems as well. Most fish farms around the world are in freshwater lakes or close-in coastal areas, and raising large quantities of fish in confined areas creates pollution from the natural waste the species produce. Both the pollutants and the networks of cages can harm fragile ecosystems, including coral reefs.

 

Environmentalists also worry about the potential for farm-raised fish to develop diseases and, if they escape their pens, imperil wild fish stocks. Many farm-bred fish are pumped up with antibiotics, which repels some consumers.

Then there’s the issue of fish feed – the major challenge facing aquaculture. The industry relies heavily on wild-caught species at the bottom of the food chain for the fish meal and fish oil needed to feed the farm-raised stocks. This has led to a decline in sardines, anchovies, and other natural forage fish. New feed made from soybeans and fishery byproducts has helped lower the dependency on overfished stocks, but experts warn much more work is needed to ensure fish farming can be expanded without despoiling the environment or depleting the oceans of other species.  

 

“People are working very hard on making aquaculture sustainable because they know that we need to increase production in a way that doesn’t make things worse,” says Mark Spalding, president of The Ocean Foundation, a Washington, D.C.-based conservation group. “I’m cautiously optimistic. The question is how are we going to do it right.”

 

China exemplifies both the best and worst practices in the growing industry. Chinese fish farmers have polluted miles of coastal waters and contaminated countless freshwater lakes in the country’s rush to expand production. They’ve bulldozed huge swaths of mangroves to make room for shrimp farms, filled lakes cheek by gill with tilapia pens, and smothered reefs with net cages. 

 

To feed these teeming schools, China has become the world’s largest importer of fish meal: It accounts for about a third of annual global trade.

Now, faced with overcrowded coastlines and dwindling sources of fresh water, China is beginning to move in a new direction. In 2013, the State Council, China’s cabinet, released a policy document that called for the “vigorous promotion” of sustainable aquaculture and the expansion of offshore fish farms. Both goals have become major components of China’s 13th five-year economic plan (2016-20), according to officials and researchers familiar with the drafting process.

 

“The future of aquaculture is in the sea,” says Dong Shuanglin, former vice president of Ocean University of China. “The challenge China now faces is to ensure a higher yield while saving energy, cutting carbon emissions, and reducing the use of fish meal.”

Dr. Dong and other experts warn that simultaneously achieving all three goals – in addition to reducing pollution – won’t be easy. But out in Sanggou Bay lies one possible solution gaining increasing attention. It’s called integrated multi-trophic aquaculture, a 21st-century name for a practice first developed in ancient China.

 

About 2,500 years ago, Chinese farmers started to add carp to their flooded rice paddies. The fish would fertilize the rice and help eliminate pesky insects and weeds in the shallow waters before becoming food themselves.

In Sanggou Bay, fishermen have adopted polycultures for the modern age. They feed only the caged finfish and abalone, while the seaweed and other shellfish that make up the bulk of the bay’s production get their nutrients directly from the water. Those act as natural filters to help keep the bay clean by absorbing the large concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus released by the fish. Meanwhile, the sea cucumbers that roam the ocean floor nibble on whatever organic waste floats to the bottom. 

 

Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture presents a major shift for Xunshan. The company originally made its name in the wild-caught fishing industry. But three decades ago, after overfishing caused the Pacific herring populations to collapse, Xunshan reconsidered its approach to producing seafood. Farm-raised kelp has since replaced herring as its top seller; abalone and scallops come in a distant second. 

 

“It was like going from hunting and gathering to agriculture,” says Mr. Bian, the company’s research-and-development director. “Fishermen here have all gone through this transformation. We call it farming the sea and raising fish in the pasture.”

•     •     •

 

Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture has become the new frontier in aquaculture. The practice has sprouted up in coastal waters stretching from the rugged fjords of Canada to the tropical seas of Indonesia. Salmon farming has taken off in places such as Iceland and Norway. Shrimp farming is booming in Thailand and India. In August, the Peruvian government issued a decree that said boosting the country’s fledgling aquaculture industry was in the “national interest.” 

 

Other countries are becoming more aggressive, too. In Russia, a company called Russian Aquaculture plans to invest $200 million in fish farming before 2020. 

Even Big Agriculture has started to take an interest in the business. On Aug. 17, American food and agriculture giant Cargill announced plans to buy a leading Norwegian salmon-feed supplier for $1.5 billion. It was Cargill’s second aquaculture acquisition in two months. In July, the company unveiled a $30 million joint venture with Naturisa, a major producer of shrimp feed, to build a feed facility in Ecuador.

 

In the United States, fish farming is a modest but growing industry. About 75 percent of the operations are in fresh water – mainly harvesting catfish, trout, and tilapia.

Yet here, too, the industry is beginning to move into coastal waters. Shellfish farming is spreading in seaside communities across New England in particular. Consider the case of Dana Pazolt, a lifelong Cape Cod resident with a New England accent and a salty tongue. 

 

Mr. Pazolt has been a lobsterman for 36 years. But in August 2013, he planted his first oysters as a way to diversify his income. His oyster farm has since become his primary focus. 

 

“My hobby farm is turning into a full-time business,” he says one morning as he scoops penny-size oyster seeds into mesh bags. He then shuffles in chest waders into the shallow waters of Cape Cod Bay to load the bags into wire cages anchored just offshore.  

Pazolt’s oyster farm is located in tidal waters behind the Sea Gull Motel, a single-story resort that his grandmother opened in 1958 but is now closing. He and his wife run a Pilates studio and the lobster boat. 

 

Scratching out a living from the sea isn’t easy, as Pazolt’s calloused hands show. He’s fallen weeks behind in setting lobster traps and repairing oyster cages. To make matters worse, half of the oysters he had planted last year died, frozen under a thick sheet of ice that covered the bay.

Yet Pazolt seems undeterred. His goal is to plant 1 million oysters this year, up from the 330,000 he planted when he started two years ago. He also wants to quadruple the size of his one-acre farm and hire four full-time employees.

 

“The fisheries industry is boom or bust,” he says. “I’m trying to take that roller coaster out of my life.”

Yet fish farming brings its own challenges. It took Pazolt nearly four years and drawerfuls of paperwork to obtain the required permits to start his oyster farm.

 

Expanding it will require even more letter-writing stamina. He blames the web of regulations for stunting aquaculture’s growth in the US.

The US controls more ocean than any other country, but 91 percent of the seafood eaten by Americans is from overseas. The growing demand for cheap imports has caused the US seafood trade deficit to rise to $11.2 billion in recent years. The US is the third largest producer of wild-caught fish in the world, yet ranks only 15th when it comes to farmed fish. Aquaculture meets less than 7 percent of the US demand for seafood. 

 

“The US industry struggles to establish and maintain a foothold in part because of regulatory uncertainty and other challenges,” Kathryn Sullivan, head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), said in February at a sustainable seafood conference in New Orleans. “And as a consequence of that, we export advanced technology, feed, equipment, and other investments to producers around the world. It’s time we put a stop to that.”

•     •     •

 

Thirty miles down Cape Cod from Pazolt’s oyster farm lies a hint of what the future of aquaculture could look like in the US. Last November, the US government issued the first permit to grow mussels in federal waters off the east coast. It leased 28.5 acres in Nantucket Sound, about four miles offshore, to a local fisherman.

 

Authorities issued a similar permit for a mussel farm in federal waters off the coast of southern California last January. 

Meanwhile, NOAA is reviewing plans to allow as many as 20 offshore fish farms in the Gulf of Mexico, and a private investment firm has partnered with the nonprofit research arm of Sea World to build a fish farm four miles off the coast of San Diego. Researchers consider the sites test cases for deep-sea aquaculture, which, if successful, could pave the way for future projects and help the US alleviate its dependency on imported seafood. Rose Canyon Fisheries, the planned farm near San Diego, will reportedly be able to produce 11 million pounds of yellowtail amberjack and sea bass each year.

 

“Nothing is going to happen fast,” says Michael Rubino, director of aquaculture at NOAA. “But hopefully we’ll learn during the next 10 years and be able to produce significantly more seafood in the future this way.”

 

China wants to push even farther out to sea. Last September, a researcher at Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute announced plans to retrofit a 200,000-ton oil tanker to operate as a floating fish farming village near Mischief Reef, a focal point of China's controversial land reclamation efforts in the South China Sea. Researchers from Ocean University of China are also planning to install fish cages in what they have dubbed a “cold water mass.” Located about 20 miles off the coast of Shandong Province in the Yellow Sea, the area is ideal for salmon farming.

 

About 6,000 cages are already being used to raise fish up to 16 miles off the coast of southern China, says Guo Genxi, a research fellow at the South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute. He adds that as technology improves, the cages will be able to extend 25 to 62 miles offshore. 

Mai Kangsen, a top adviser to the Chinese central government on aquaculture development, talks about deep-sea fish farming with a scientist’s reserved optimism. It’s where he sees the industry heading, but he’s quick to point out the challenges in getting there. He’s well aware of the practical difficulties of growing fish in the open ocean: strong currents, high waves, and unpredictable weather. But he has no doubt that they can be overcome.

The same goes for the challenge of feeding 2 billion more people over the next 35 years. For Dr. Mai, it all comes down to a simple equation. 

 

“To guarantee food security, we have to use less resources to produce more food,” he says. “Aquaculture is the most efficient way to do that.”

Back in Sanggou Bay, marine researcher Liu Hui is skipping across the water in a wooden skiff. She peers out at all the activity in the harbor as her boat weaves in and out of the hundreds of buoys, looking like pixels. In the distance, one boat pulls several wooden rafts, lashed together by rope, behind it – an ocean train headed out to collect seaweed. Men on other boats strain to pull up lines, checking them for shellfish. 

 

Ms. Liu has been coming here for more than 15 years. It’s long enough for her to remember when Sanggou Bay was a struggling fishing community. Now it sits in the vanguard of a possible global food revolution.

 

“Anyone who lived 30 years ago would be surprised by how far aquaculture has come,” she says, glancing across the bay. “It’s amazing to see.”

http://news.yahoo.co...-160101181.html


Edited by riseabovethought, 26 October 2015 - 11:02 AM.

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#60 riseabovethought

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Posted 26 December 2015 - 01:11 PM

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