Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

outdoor mushroom pests


  • Please log in to reply
41 replies to this topic

#1 shimmy

shimmy

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 318 posts

Posted 12 March 2006 - 03:38 PM

im starting a larger outdoor bed soon and was wondering the best stuff to get rid of rollie pollies haha and snails, slugs, etc cuss they go nuts on my beds

#2 max

max

    canadian

  • Banned Member
  • 1,084 posts

Posted 12 March 2006 - 03:43 PM

A raised bed surrounded by boards.

#3 Pedestrian

Pedestrian

    Dreamspace Transient

  • Expired Member
  • 572 posts

Posted 12 March 2006 - 03:50 PM

rollie pollies!!!

I went homicidal on them after they invaded the last patch of subs I threw down.

Gasoline + Match:flamer:

#4 Guest_Littlejohnnybiggums_*

Guest_Littlejohnnybiggums_*
  • Guest

Posted 12 March 2006 - 04:30 PM

Dont kill em! Talk it out with them. Send them some love and they will be cool.


Set a pile of food for them somewhere else. =)


Theres no need for killing! =)

#5 shimmy

shimmy

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 318 posts

Posted 12 March 2006 - 05:40 PM

wont that just feed and make more of them to send to battle with my cubensis? im gonna try and use boards but its a stealth bed so i might just have to cry when the casualties arrive. here is a shot of the future plot its going to be around 5 feet by 3 feet pf classic status
http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1142203484

Attached Thumbnails

  • P1010034.JPG


#6 Guest_cap_*

Guest_cap_*
  • Guest

Posted 12 March 2006 - 05:46 PM

Diatomaceous earth

#7 Invalid Comfort

Invalid Comfort

    Brother Pinja

  • Expired Member
  • 94 posts

Posted 12 March 2006 - 06:02 PM

Diatomaceous earth


D.E isn't bio-degradable, and is harmful to the envoirnment. I'm unaware of the ramifications with using it in a bed though.

In what specifics are we talking about Cap?

#8 shimmy

shimmy

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 318 posts

Posted 12 March 2006 - 06:03 PM

its to getl the snails

#9 Guest_cap_*

Guest_cap_*
  • Guest

Posted 12 March 2006 - 06:56 PM

whether its biodegradable or not its the only option i can think of aside from pesticides-i guess neem would work, but the slugs arent going to care what you spray.

the only other bio-control to keep them at bay besides DE is with a small container of beer set out a bit aways from the plot, which will draw them to that, then they drown (not really the best bet though)

Id imagine you could use the DE as a 'casing' with good success.

or make a border around your plot.

i use bare copper wire wrapped around the trunks of my plants OD to keep slugs off. it acts like an electric fence to them.. dunno how you'd incorporat this for so low to the ground, i guess the bed is the only way.

maybe a sandbox?:D

ps- i'm talking about the garden stuff, available at any nursery in the pest department in bags or jugs..
they make food grade DE too, i dont know the difference or what it's properties are tho, sorry

#10 malefacter

malefacter

    :P

  • Expired Member
  • 1,047 posts

Posted 12 March 2006 - 07:00 PM

put a heavy border of salt around your bed put something under it so it don't soak into the ground and kill plants

#11 Guest_cap_*

Guest_cap_*
  • Guest

Posted 12 March 2006 - 07:04 PM

im pretty sure table salt would be lethal to mycelium, too

if you put something under it other than maybe dug into the ground, theyll crawl right under it..especially the waterbugs and prolly the slugs too.

DE shouldnt be a problem.

if your worried its going to pollute your backyard (:lol:) just scoop it out with a shovel and into the trash when yer done, or, use it as a moisture retainer in your flower pots. recycle.

be well, hope this helps

#12 Invalid Comfort

Invalid Comfort

    Brother Pinja

  • Expired Member
  • 94 posts

Posted 12 March 2006 - 08:45 PM

whether its biodegradable or not its the only option i can think of aside from pesticides-i guess neem would work, but the slugs arent going to care what you spray.

the only other bio-control to keep them at bay besides DE is with a small container of beer set out a bit aways from the plot, which will draw them to that, then they drown (not really the best bet though)

Id imagine you could use the DE as a 'casing' with good success.

or make a border around your plot.

i use bare copper wire wrapped around the trunks of my plants OD to keep slugs off. it acts like an electric fence to them.. dunno how you'd incorporat this for so low to the ground, i guess the bed is the only way.

maybe a sandbox?:D

ps- i'm talking about the garden stuff, available at any nursery in the pest department in bags or jugs..
they make food grade DE too, i dont know the difference or what it's properties are tho, sorry


How does it D.e work as a pesticide? I wasn't aware that they made any other grade of D.E. I work in a pool store, so I'm aware of what's used insides pool fitlers but that pretty much limits my knowledge.

I do know, be careful not to breathe it though, it settles permenatly in the lungs (O.O).

#13 Guest_cap_*

Guest_cap_*
  • Guest

Posted 12 March 2006 - 09:20 PM

Diatomaceous earth
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Diatomaceous earth, also known as diatomite, kieselguhr, kieselgur, and Celite, is a naturally occurring, soft, chalk-like, sedimentary rock that is easily crumbled into a fine white to off-white powder. This powder has an abrasive feeling similar to pumice powder and is very light-weight due to its high porosity. It is made primarily of silica and consists of fossilized remains of diatoms, a type of hard-shelled algae. It is used as a filtration aid, as a mild abrasive, as a mechanical insecticide, as an absorbent for liquids, as cat litter, and as a component of dynamite. Heat resistant as well, kieselguhr can be used as an insulator.
Applications
Filtration
The most common use (68%) of diatomaceous earth is a filter medium, especially for swimming pools. Diatomaceous earth has a high porosity because it is made of microscopically small coffin-like hollow particles. It is used in chemistry as a filtration aid to filter very fine particles that would otherwise pass or clog the filter paper. It is also used to filter water and other liquids such as beer. It can also filter syrups and sugar. Other industustries such as paper, paints, ceramics, soap, and detergents use it as
Abrasive
The oldest use of diatomite is as a very mild abrasive and for this purpose has been used in toothpaste and metal polishes.

Pest repellent
Diatomaceous earth is also used as an insecticide due to its abrasive properties. The fine powder abrades the cuticle, the waxy outer layer of insects' exoskeleton, causing them to dehydrate. In addition to insects, this also works against gastropods and is commonly employed in gardening to defeat slugs. Beekeepers are apparently experimenting with it to keep small hive beetles from breeding. It is sometimes mixed with an attractant or other additives to increase its effectiveness. Medical grade diatomaceous earth is sometimes used to de-worm both animals and humans.

Absorbent
Its absorbent qualities make it useful for spill cleanup and the U.S. Center for Disease Control recommends it to clean up toxic liquid spills.
More recently, diatomaceous earth has been employed as a primary ingredient in a type of cat litter. The type of silica used in cat litter comes from freshwater sources and does not pose a significant health risk to pets or humans.
In 1867, Alfred Nobel discovered that nitroglycerin could be made much more stable if absorbed in diatomaceous earth. He patented this mixture as dynamite.
Geology
Because diatomaceous earth forms from the remains of water-borne diatoms, it is found in proximity to either current or former bodies of water. Diatomaceous earth is generally divided into two categories based upon source: freshwater and saltwater. Freshwater diatomaceous earth is mined from dry lakebeds and is characteristically low in crystalline silica content. Saltwater diatomaceous earth, in contrast, contains a high crystalline silica content making it a useful material for filters due to the sieve-like features of the crystals.
Specific varieties
* TripoliteDakine refers to the variety found in Tripoli, Libya.
* Bann clay refers to the variety found in the Lower Bann valley in Northern Ireland.
Safety considerations
The absorbent qualities of diatomaceous earth can result in a significant drying of the hands if handled without gloves. The saltwater form contains the highly crystalline form of silica resulting in sharp edges. The sharpness of this version of the material makes it dangerous to breathe and a dust mask is recommended when working with it.
The type of hazard posed by inhalation depends on the form of the silica. Crystalline silica (silicon dioxide) poses a serious inhalation hazard because it can cause silicosis and can eventually lead to cancer. Amorphous silica can cause dusty lungs, but does not carry the same degree of risk as crystalline silica. Food-grade diatomaceous earth generally contains very low percentages of crystalline silica. Diatomaceous earth produced for pool filters is treated with heat, causing the formerly amorphous silicon dioxide to assume crystalline form; so if you want to know the risk you are assuming with exposure to diatomaceous earth, it is important to ascertain its crystalline silica content.

hope this helps

#14 Guest_cap_*

Guest_cap_*
  • Guest

Posted 12 March 2006 - 09:32 PM

make sure theres no foliage or other objects hanging over your plot, theyll use it as a bridge to get into the goodies..
i guess if you wrap copper around the bases of the surrounding native plants ya dont have to worry about Kamakaze slugs:dead:

#15 Invalid Comfort

Invalid Comfort

    Brother Pinja

  • Expired Member
  • 94 posts

Posted 12 March 2006 - 11:13 PM

heh, i've learned alot today. thanks Cap :)

#16 {Mr}fLoYd

{Mr}fLoYd

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 209 posts

Posted 12 March 2006 - 11:30 PM

anyone have anything to say about worms, i had to make room in my fruiting chamber so i did a hope a prayer job with a straw log, my compost is outrageously ritch and the humidity and temp is right but there were a lot of worms in my compost, its a mulched leafe and decomposted food stuffs compost all home made, just curious, if i get anything i would be supprised.

#17 microscopyuseonly

microscopyuseonly

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 32 posts

Posted 09 June 2006 - 02:05 PM

So many questions and soo close to bedtime. I guess I'll begin by saying that I started with cubes indoors (because thats what I saw most peeps were doing) on manure in tubs and after much frustration yet alot of success I decided one day this spring to let nature do most of the work and took my colonized tubs and threw them outside as per the directions in many posts I read in the archives thinking "this is too good to be true and will prob. fail".
Fast forward to today (three weeks later) and I'm looking at the most awesome spectacle of pinset heaven that I've ever seen. I'm talking 1 day old fruits that are about 1 inch tall and as fat as your big toe. From my indoor experience it appears as though I may be looking at multiple lbs. dry. But as suggested by the title, the very same day I saw my first fruits was the same day that I became overcome by rolly polly's, snails, and slugs and see that already I have lost otherwise healthy fruits do to these pests. I have just treated the area with a pesticide made for slugs etc...... and was wondering what else I can do to prevent further infestation and what pests are the ones that I need to worry about? I can't imagine the rolly's eating fungi, but I'm no bug expert my any means. And I can't lay down salt because I'm relying on the local foliage to keep my crop in the shade and well hidden. You guys got me this far, just a little nudge in the right direction would get me all the way.... Thanx all

#18 ShadowBoom

ShadowBoom

    Mycophage

  • Expired Member
  • 126 posts

Posted 09 June 2006 - 02:08 PM

I'm not really sure how to answer your question, but I would really love to see some pictures of your little outdoor farm :cool:

#19 microscopyuseonly

microscopyuseonly

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 32 posts

Posted 09 June 2006 - 02:18 PM

Just looking for tips, tricks, experiences etc.... It's kind of a rare situation I have but at this point if you have a secure place to do it I couldn't recommend anything higher than outdoor on poo/straw. Sorry no digicam but am saving my pennies and will have one this fall (gas is killing me).

#20 alpiner

alpiner

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 429 posts

Posted 09 June 2006 - 05:08 PM

I don't like using strong chemical poisons that can hurt my pets so I do make use of beer traps and trap crops or compost
and of course when I do see slugs they get squished, also cafeine is toxic to slugs so if you put very strong coffee in a spray bottle it is a good repelent for them but only lasts a day or so




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!