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have you ever grown stevia (sugar leaf) before?


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#1 iamsmiley

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 09:52 PM

i have been hearing about stevia for a number of years now, but today was the first time tasting it.it seems like a good alternative to sugar.my next door neighbour has a couple plants she said i can clone.i'm trying to decide if i should agar clone it under a flow hood or just try to clone it in rock wool with verm under it.maybe i'll try both.i hear it does not grow well from seed and its not always sweet when grown from seed.any advice or experience from this would be greatly appreciated.i told my neighbour i want to take a few clones by tommorow(hopefully) before she cuts it down.she knows little about it also.what kind of simple agar might be best???
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#2 copelandiaKidd

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Posted 13 September 2010 - 07:41 AM

smiley, you are too funny..... plant cloning requires no agar. hehe.... I can tell you are a true MycoHeart!!!!! you just take a cutting and place it in either water till roots shoot out, or go buy rooting hormone and dip the stem in it about a half inch and then plant so It can develope roots.....the later is preferred with thin stemmed plants because the hormone almost always takes as water does not always work. it works great on basil!!!!!


No agar required!!!!! :)

#3 Freaky

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Posted 13 September 2010 - 08:55 AM

I moved to DIY farm forum. This is our regular gardening/animal do-it-yourself forum.

#4 shroom_seeker

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Posted 13 September 2010 - 10:08 AM

I haven't grown stevia myself, but this might help:
http://www.stevia.co...Own_Stevia/8077 :hippie:

Stevia Propagation and Container Growing
Stevia stem cuttings root easily without hormones, but only under long day conditions. A fluorescent shop or plant growth light both work well. Leave the light on 14 to 16 hours per day, 5 to 9 inches above the cuttings. An automatic timer will make the job easier. Even with artificial light, Stevia cuttings root most easily during the long days of spring. Cuttings should be taken in March for transplanting in May or June. Plants from later cuttings may be over-wintered in pots under fluorescent lights.

Fall cuttings root successfully with the use of rooting hormones. Use a low-strength rooting compound available from garden retailers or make your own natural compound with Steve Marsden's recipe. Harvest a handful of willow branch tips and remove the foliage, then liquefy in a blender with twice the volume of water. Dip cuttings in this mixture before placing in the rooting medium.

Coarse or medium grade horticultural vermiculite works well for rooting Stevia. Mr. Marsden prefers a peat-lite mix that includes bark, especially for outdoor propagation beds. Coarse, clean sand may be used as well. Place small pots, or cell packs with drainage holes, in flats or trays to facilitate watering from below as needed. With a sharp blade or pruning tool, make cuttings 2 to 4 inches long. Each cutting should have 2 or 3 nodes. A node is where leaves attach to the stem. Cut between, rather than at the nodes. (Sumida, 1980). Plunge the proximal end (closest to the roots on the mother plant) of the cutting into the rooting medium far enough so that at least one node is buried and at least one node remains above the surface. Remove all leaves from buried nodes. Above the surface, remove large leaves by cutting or pinching leaf stems, taking care not to damage the tiny axillary leaves emerging behind large leaves. These axillary leaves are the growing points of your new plant. Keep cuttings at 60 F to 70 F. Indoors, under lights, misting is not necessary. Outdoors, or in a sunlit greenhouse, cuttings should be misted several times per day until roots are well formed. After about a week, growth should be evident if rooting was successful. After 3 to 4 weeks, transfer plants to larger pots (at least 3-4 inches in diameter) with standard potting soil. Transplant these to the garden in another 2 to 4 weeks or keep as a container plant.

For older plants, keep the fluorescent light a few inches above the foliage. When stems reach 7 to 10 inches in length, cut them back to promote branching and vigor. Over-wintered plants look devitalized by the end of the winter, but regain vigor when transplanted outdoors. Some plants will inevitably be lost, so grow more than you think you'll need. Stevia may also be grown outdoors in containers such as gallon pots. If you start with a high-quality potting soil that has organic fertilizers mixed in, further fertilization may be unnecessary, but a monthly watering with a dilute seaweed solution can be beneficial. Mr. Langan recommends a balanced, slow release fertilizer applied every two weeks for container plants. He also advises using wooden containers or the double pot method to insulate roots from summer heat. Place in full sun when it's cool, but provide shade during hot weather, making sure the soil doesn't dry out. For perennial production, bring containers indoors before the first frost.



#5 iamsmiley

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Posted 13 September 2010 - 12:30 PM

smiley, you are too funny..... plant cloning requires no agar. hehe.... I can tell you are a true MycoHeart!!!!! you just take a cutting and place it in either water till roots shoot out, or go buy rooting hormone and dip the stem in it about a half inch and then plant so It can develope roots.....the later is preferred with thin stemmed plants because the hormone almost always takes as water does not always work. it works great on basil!!!!!


No agar required!!!!! :)

actually stevia is often grown commercially using "plant tissue culture" (google it,its actually pretty cool,i got a book on it from Stamets called plants from test tubes).they use agar to do this.black orchads are often cloned in this method but i'm thinking i will probably try cloning it like i would pot.i'm doing some agar today anyways so i might try one like that just for the hell of it.i'm hearing it likes fruit sugar and i got some in my agar kit.i got some rooting hormone gel stuff i always use for cloning.

#6 iamsmiley

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Posted 15 September 2010 - 12:37 AM

i took a couple clones in rock wool on vermiculite.

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#7 iamsmiley

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 09:34 PM

well it took almost a month to get my stevia clone to grow roots but one finally did.i cloned it in a rockwool cube on damp verm in a humidity dome.i usually get pot to clone in a week or two but when i was begining to wonder if this thing was ever going to grow roots it finally did.i started with two clones and lost one when it got to dry on me.




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