Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Cinnamon as Anti Microbial/Antifungal Substrate mix + Bee Pollen


  • Please log in to reply
77 replies to this topic

#1 Justintime

Justintime

    Justincase

  • OG VIP
  • 1,665 posts

Posted 18 October 2010 - 11:00 PM

This thread is an informative work for the use of Cinnamon and Bee pollen as substrate additives which are antimicrobial/Antifungal. Especially against Trichoderma and Cobweb contaminants. I will be uploading pics of my current grow which is exposed daily to air. Please be patient with this thread and allow me to construct it fully with all information before posting, it has taken me many hrs researching .Thankyou I will post a message when it is complete.

I thought I should start with a little info on Cinnamon.


When added to food, it inhibits bacterial growth and food spoilage, making it a natural food preservative.

One study found that smelling cinnamon boosts cognitive function and memory.

Researchers at Kansas State University found that cinnamon fights the E. coli bacteria in unpasteurized juices.

10. It is a great source of manganese, fiber, iron, and calcium.

Anti-Microbial Activity

Cinnamon's essential oils also qualify it as an "anti-microbial" food, and cinnamon has been studied for its ability to help stop the growth of bacteria as well as fungi, including the commonly problematic yeast Candida. In laboratory tests, growth of yeasts that were resistant to the commonly used anti-fungal medication fluconazole was often (though not always) stopped by cinnamon extracts.
Cinnamon's antimicrobial properties are so effective that recent research demonstrates this spice can be used as an alternative to traditional food preservatives. In a study, published in the August 2003 issue of the International Journal of Food Microbiology, the addition of just a few drops of cinnamon essential oil to 100 ml (approximately 3 ounces) of carrot broth, which was then refrigerated, inhibited the growth of the foodborne pathogenic Bacillus cereus for at least 60 days. When the broth was refrigerated without the addition of cinnamon oil, the pathogenic B. cereus flourished despite the cold temperature. In addition, researchers noted that the addition of cinnamon acted as an effective preservative.

Cinnamon, ground

In-depth nutrient analysis:
Cinnamon, ground
(Note: "--" indicates data is unavailable)
amount 2.00 tsp
total weight 4.52 g
Basic Components
nutrient amount %DV
calories 11.84 0.66
calories from fat 1.28
calories from saturated fat 0.28
protein 0.16 g 0.32
carbohydrates 3.60 g 1.20
dietary fiber 2.48 g 9.92
soluble fiber -- g
insoluble fiber -- g
sugar - total -- g
monosaccharides -- g
disaccharides -- g
other carbs -- g
fat - total 0.16 g 0.25
saturated fat 0.04 g 0.20
mono fat 0.04 g 0.17
poly fat 0.04 g 0.17
trans fatty acids 0.00 g
cholesterol 0.00 mg 0.00
water 0.44 g
ash 0.16 g
Vitamins
nutrient amount %DV
vitamin A IU 11.80 IU 0.24
vitamin A RE 1.16 RE
A - carotenoid 1.16 RE 0.02
A - retinol 0.00 RE
A - beta carotene 7.08 mcg
thiamin - B1 0.00 mg 0.00
riboflavin - B2 0.00 mg 0.00
niacin - B3 0.04 mg 0.20
niacin equiv 0.04 mg
vitamin B6 0.00 mg 0.00
vitamin B12 0.00 mcg 0.00
biotin -- mcg --
vitamin C 1.28 mg 2.13
vitamin D IU 0.00 IU 0.00
vitamin D mcg 0.00 mcg
vitamin E alpha equiv 0.00 mg 0.00
vitamin E IU 0.00 IU
vitamin E mg 0.00 mg
folate 1.32 mcg 0.33
vitamin K 1.44 mcg 1.80
pantothenic acid -- mg --
Minerals
nutrient amount %DV
boron -- mcg
calcium 55.68 mg 5.57
chloride -- mg
chromium -- mcg --
copper 0.00 mg 0.00
fluoride -- mg --
iodine -- mcg --
iron 1.72 mg 9.56
magnesium 2.52 mg 0.63
manganese 0.76 mg 38.00
molybdenum -- mcg --
phosphorus 2.80 mg 0.28
potassium 22.68 mg 0.65
selenium 0.04 mcg 0.06
sodium 1.20 mg 0.05
zinc 0.08 mg 0.53
Saturated Fats
nutrient amount %DV
4:0 butyric 0.00 g
6:0 caproic 0.00 g
8:0 caprylic 0.00 g
10:0 capric 0.00 g
12:0 lauric 0.00 g
14:0 myristic 0.00 g
15:0 pentadecanoic 0.00 g
16:0 palmitic 0.00 g
17:0 margaric 0.00 g
18:0 stearic 0.00 g
20:0 arachidic 0.00 g
22:0 behenate 0.00 g
24:0 lignoceric 0.00 g
Mono Fats
nutrient amount %DV
14:1 myristol 0.00 g
15:1 pentadecenoic 0.00 g
16:1 palmitol 0.00 g
17:1 heptadecenoic 0.00 g
18:1 oleic 0.04 g
20:1 eicosen 0.00 g
22:1 erucic 0.00 g
24:1 nervonic 0.00 g
Poly Fats
nutrient amount %DV
18:2 linoleic 0.04 g
18:3 linolenic 0.00 g
18:4 stearidon 0.00 g
20:3 eicosatrienoic 0.00 g
20:4 arachidon 0.00 g
20:5 EPA 0.00 g
22:5 DPA 0.00 g
22:6 DHA 0.00 g
Other Fats
nutrient amount %DV
omega 3 fatty acids 0.00 g 0.00
omega 6 fatty acids 0.04 g
Amino Acids
nutrient amount %DV
alanine -- g
arginine -- g
aspartate -- g
cystine -- g --
glutamate -- g
glycine -- g
histidine -- g --
isoleucine -- g --
leucine -- g --
lysine -- g --
methionine -- g --
phenylalanine -- g --
proline -- g
serine -- g
threonine -- g --
tryptophan -- g --
tyrosine -- g --
valine -- g --
Other
nutrient amount %DV
alcohol 0.00 g
caffeine 0.00 mg
artif sweetener total -- mg
aspartame -- mg
saccharin -- mg
sugar alcohol -- g
glycerol -- g
inositol -- g
mannitol -- g
sorbitol -- g
xylitol -- g
organic acids -- mg
acetic acid -- mg
citric acid -- mg
lactic acid -- mg
malic acid -- mg
choline -- mg --
taurine -- mg


Cinnamaldehyde
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Cinnamaldehyde

IUPAC name[hide]
(2E)-3-phenylprop-2-enal
Other names[hide]
Cinnamic aldehyde; trans-cinnamaldehyde
Identifiers
CAS number 104-55-2 YesY
PubChem 637511
ChemSpider 553117
UNII SR60A3XG0F YesY
IUPHAR ligand 2423
RTECS number GD6475000
SMILES
[show]
c1ccc(cc1)/C=C/C=O
InChI
[show]
1/C9H8O/c10-8-4-7-9-5-2-1-3-6-9/h1-8H/b7-4+
InChI key KJPRLNWUNMBNBZ-QPJJXVBHBH
Properties
Molecular formula C9H8O
Molar mass 132.16 g/mol
Appearance Yellow oil
Density 1.05 g/ml
Melting point

-7.5 °C
Boiling point

248 °C
Solubility in water Slightly Soluble
Viscosity ? cP at ?°C
Hazards
MSDS External MSDS
R-phrases R36 R37 R38
S-phrases S26 S36
NFPA 704
NFPA 704.svg
2
2
0
Flash point 71 °C
Related compounds
Related compounds Cinnamic acid
YesY (what is this?) (verify)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox references

Cinnamaldehyde is the organic compound that gives cinnamon its flavor and odor.[1] This pale yellow viscous liquid occurs naturally in the bark of cinnamon trees and other species of the genus Cinnamomum. The essential oil of cinnamon bark is about 90% cinnamaldehyde.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Structure and synthesis
o 1.1 Synthesis
o 1.2 Biosynthesis
* 2 Applications
o 2.1 As a flavorant
o 2.2 As an agrichemical
o 2.3 As an antimicrobial
o 2.4 As an anti-cancer agent
o 2.5 Miscellaneous uses
* 3 Derivatives of cinnamaldehyde
* 4 Toxicology
* 5 References

Structure and synthesis

Cinnamaldehyde was isolated from cinnamon essential oil in 1834 by Dumas and Péligot and synthesized in the laboratory by Chiozza in 1854.

The natural product is trans-cinnamaldehyde. The molecule consists of a phenyl group attached to an unsaturated aldehyde. As such, the molecule can be viewed as a derivative of acrolein. Its color is due to the π ? π* transition: increased conjugation in comparison with acrolein shifts this band towards the visible.

Synthesis

Several methods of laboratory synthesis exist, but cinnamaldehyde is most economically obtained from the steam distillation of the oil of cinnamon bark. The compound can be prepared from related compounds like cinnamyl alcohol, (the alcohol form of cinnamaldehyde), but the first synthesis from unrelated compounds was the aldol condensation of benzaldehyde and acetaldehyde.

Biosynthesis

Cinnamaldehyde occurs widely and closely related compounds give rise to lignin. All such compounds are biosynthesized starting from phenylalanine, which undergoes conversion to cinnamoyl ester of coenzyme A.[3]
Applications

As a flavorant

The most obvious application for cinnamaldehyde is as flavoring in items like chewing gum, ice cream, candy, and beverages range from 9 to 4900ppm(parts per million) (that is, less than 0.5%). It is also used in some perfumes of natural, sweet, or fruity scents. Almond, apricot, butterscotch, and other aromas may partially employ the compound for their pleasant smells. Cinnamaldehyde can be used as a food adulterant; powdered beechnut husk aromatized with cinnamaldehyde can be marketed as powdered cinnamon.

As an agrichemical

Cinnamaldehyde is also used as a fungicide. Proven effective on over 40 different crops, cinnamaldehyde is typically applied to the root systems of plants. Its low toxicity and well-known properties make it ideal for agriculture. Cinnamaldehyde is an effective insecticide, and its scent is also known to repel animals like cats and dogs. Cinnamaldehyde has recently been recognized as a very effective insecticide for mosquito larvae. As little as 29 ppm (parts per million) of cinnamaldehyde kills half of Aedes aegypti mosquito larvae in 24 hours.

As an antimicrobial

Another use for cinnamaldehyde is as an antimicrobial. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago (who were funded by the Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company) have found that cinnamic aldehyde, when used in Big Red, prevented oral bacterial growth by more than 50 percent.[9] It is especially effective against bacteria living at the back of the tongue, reducing anaerobic bacteria populations by about 43 percent.

As an anti-cancer agent

Recent research documents anti-cancer activity of cinnamaldehyde/cinnamic aldehyde observed in cell culture and animal models of the disease. Proliferation, invasion, and tumor growth were inhibited in a murine A375 model of human melanoma.

Miscellaneous uses

Cinnamaldehyde is also known as a corrosion inhibitor for steel and other ferrous alloys in corrosive fluids. It can be used in combination with additional components such as dispersing agents, solvents and other surfactants.

Numerous derivatives of cinnamaldehyde are commercially useful. Dihydrocinnamic alcohol (CAS#122-97-4), which occurs naturally but is produced by double hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde, is used to confer the fragrances of hyacinth and lilac. Cinnamic alcohol (CAS#104-54-1) similarly occurs naturally and has the odor of lilac. Dihydrocinnamaldehyde (CAS#104-53-0) is produced by the selective hydrogenation of the alkene subunit. α-Amyl- and α-hexylcinnamaldehyde are important commercial fragrances, but they are not prepared from cinnamaldehyde.[4]
[edit] Toxicology

Cinnamaldehyde is used in agriculture because of its low toxicity. It is however a skin irritant.

Its level in 'cinnamon' extracts and powders has concerned the German BfR. ( Perhaps the German equivalent of the FDA)



Anti-Biotic and Anti-Fungal (Anti-Microbial) Properties of Cinnamon

Plant oils and other extractions have been used throughout the evolution by humans for reasons such as food preservation, alternate medicine, and culinary aids. Since then plant extracts have come a long way and while they satisfy their original purpose, they have also gifted human kind with far more advanced benefits as well. One such plant is the Cinnamon plant. It is a native plant of the tropical islands and this is also considered a herb and a spice traditionally used by many ancient cultures. The bark is dried and used in many occasions and cinnamon oil is also quite popular. The bark possesses a strong but pleasant aroma as well as a distinct taste.

Cinnamon possesses various important qualities and this report is focusing on two main qualities which are beneficial in many ways. There are various plants and animals that posses anti bacterial properties. A very prominent example would be honey which is commonly used for and immensely popular as a medicine as well. Cinnamon is also of no difference. The fact that Cinnamon has anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties has given it huge prominence among its fellow herbs. Its bark as well as its oil is both used to satisfy many anti-bacterial and anti-fungal requirements.
Attributes of Cinnamon

Cinnamon is said to be active against “Candida Albicans” a fungus which is responsible for yeast infections 1. This has become a commonly used home remedy among many people due to this reason. Also an experiment was done using different types of slices of bread and these were subjected to dangerous aflatoxins which are so dangerous that they cause liver cancer and kill humans as well as animals. One slice, which was previously treated with twenty milligrams of cinnamon showed no sign of viral growth at all; hence showing the strong anti fungal property of cinnamon. Another main research was done at the University of Illinois Chicago and that has proven that Cinnamon flavoured chewing-gum has a strong anti bacterial effect in the mouth and can negate bad breath 2. This is the same for various similar products such as cinnamon toothpicks.

Cinnamon oil is distilled from the bark / leaf of the cinnamon tree itself and has been used against infections due to its high anti microbial and anti bacterial properties. Cinnamon oil is capable of killing various bacterial pathogens3. And according to their observations, cinnamon oil appears to be as effective as several antiseptics and has found use in many hospitals a a disinfectant.

Further, a German study has proven that cinnamon completely suppresses the cause of most urinary tract infections1.

Prabuseenivasan and Jayakumar (2006) 4, describes the anti bacterial activity of some plant oils and various essential oils. Cinnamon, citronella, clove, mint, lime, orange and lemon, were used and tested for antibacterial activity and cinnamon oil was one of the few which satisfied all their criteria. The research further explained some of the uses of cinnamon as a germicide, which is used internally in typhoid fever and in the treatment of cancer and other microbial diseases. It is also said to be used as an antiseptic. Further studies with regard to cinnamon extracts against food borne pathogens and foliage micro organisms by Lopez, p, et al, (2009) has proven that the highest anti bacterial activity was found for cloves and cinnamon against most of the bacterial cocktails and they have further concluded that use of cinnamon essential oil can provide an adequate degree of protection against food borne pathogens to a certain extent due to its anti-bacterial quality.

Bari et al, (2009) has proven the fact noted previously about cinnamon possessing anti-bacterial properties. A detailed article of cinnamon by Stuart, A, (2005) has included his key findings with regard to the benefits of cinnamon. They are listed as follows:

1. Can be treated externally as a poultice to treat minor bacterial and fungal infections on the skin.
2. Some of the plant constituents have proven value against bacteria and fungi, including the moulds that produce the carcinogenic aflatoxins.
3. Its essential oil contains both antifungal and antibacterial principles that can be used to prevent food spoilage due to bacterial contamination.
Conclusion

In conclusion and by studying the results and research taken into example, it is evident that the cinnamon plant; in any form processes highly beneficial qualities. It’s antibacterial and anti fungal aspects can be taken as two of the major benefits that can be used with minimum cost and maximum effectiveness. The studies and articles cited in the report have proven these qualities beyond a doubt and it is evident that cinnamon is ready to fulfil a new objective apart from being just a regular household spice.

Edited by Justincase, 19 October 2010 - 12:24 AM.

  • kcmoxtractor and TurkeyRanch like this

#2 iamsmiley

iamsmiley

    the ice woman

  • Expired Member
  • 1,766 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 12:26 AM

i hope i didn't butt in on your post to soon but i have played around with cinnamon in growing.i had gotten a load of bad dirt and on the advice of a friend with a horticultural degree she told me to use it.my problem was these yellow mushrooms kept growing out of my plant buckets.besides substantially slowing the growth of my plants these lemon yellow scaly mushrooms would pop up every time i watered or any time they dam well pleased.i was very concerned about these releasing spores into my room and mushies.i wasn't really into using poison on something i wished to smoke so she told me to mix it with my water when i had to water.the cinnamon did seem to slow these suckers down but not stop them,maybe i didn't use enough??? i had a lemon tree growing in the room for fun and it was the only thing left with this bad dirt so i ended up stopping the yellow mushies with fungicide for once(i got tired of playing this game).

the cinnamon definitely helped but i think it might also inhibit mushie mycelium growth we want as well as the contams.one thing i could see doing with it is trying to inject contams with it, but salt does the same thing.i'm interested in your findings.how do you plan to use it? and where in the world does it grow naturally?

#3 Justintime

Justintime

    Justincase

  • OG VIP
  • 1,665 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 12:33 AM

Posted ImagePosted Image

#4 Justintime

Justintime

    Justincase

  • OG VIP
  • 1,665 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 12:42 AM

i hope i didn't butt in on your post to soon but i have played around with cinnamon in growing.i had gotten a load of bad dirt and on the advice of a friend with a horticultural degree she told me to use it.my problem was these yellow mushrooms kept growing out of my plant buckets.besides substantially slowing the growth of my plants these lemon yellow scaly mushrooms would pop up every time i watered or any time they dam well pleased.i was very concerned about these releasing spores into my room and mushies.i wasn't really into using poison on something i wished to smoke so she told me to mix it with my water when i had to water.the cinnamon did seem to slow these suckers down but not stop them,maybe i didn't use enough??? i had a lemon tree growing in the room for fun and it was the only thing left with this bad dirt so i ended up stopping the yellow mushies with fungicide for once(i got tired of playing this game).

the cinnamon definitely helped but i think it might also inhibit mushie mycelium growth we want as well as the contams.one thing i could see doing with it is trying to inject contams with it, but salt does the same thing.i'm interested in your findings.how do you plan to use it? and where in the world does it grow naturally?


Lol, youre an early bird Smiley. I am useing it, I have pics to upload later today. No it isnt slowing my Mycelium growth.The Cinnamon needs to be real Cinnamon. It grows in India. It has to be infused in boiling water to release the oils. Cinnamon is'nt harmful to Mushrooms. I have much more evidence to post. A little at a time, I have a busy day on.Patience. Cinnamon kills fungal contaminans but not true Fungi.
  • cym likes this

#5 cheor

cheor

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 19 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 02:00 AM

the cinnamon definitely helped but i think it might also inhibit mushie mycelium growth we want as well as the contams.

if your using cinnamon in amounts that will stop sores from germinating its too much for the mushrooms to grow. do a little more research on the topic then wikipedia justintime cinnamon at the proper concentrations to inhibit spore growth will burst the cell walls of any higher fungi's mycelium. wanna see some instant bruising put a drop of cinnamon essential oil on a cake and watch as everything for a couple inches around it dies
  • kcmoxtractor likes this

#6 jimbojones

jimbojones

    Just some Dude

  • Expired Member
  • 409 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 02:27 AM

if your using cinnamon in amounts that will stop sores from germinating its too much for the mushrooms to grow. do a little more research on the topic then wikipedia justintime cinnamon at the proper concentrations to inhibit spore growth will burst the cell walls of any higher fungi's mycelium. wanna see some instant bruising put a drop of cinnamon essential oil on a cake and watch as everything for a couple inches around it dies


However, if he is boiling his cinnamon before using it then he is removing all the volatile oils with the steam, add a distillation apparatus and that would be how you extract cinnamon oil from cinnamon. So, his work is not discredited by your cinnamon oil argument. By way of his preparation it seems he is removing the harmful volatile oils prior to adding it to the substrate.

#7 cheor

cheor

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 19 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 02:33 AM

umm read the articles on cinnamons antimicrobial activity, its all due to those harmful volatile oils he's boiling off :) without them your not gonna prevent anything, i think one of the many plants that offer selective protection from specific species of mold is more likely to be of use then one of the many plants thats just going to kill anything living it comes into contact with. a few plants you might wanna do some looking into. kava kava, acorus calamus, fo-ti, and calea urticifolia are a few plants that are selective in wich species of fungus and bacteria they prevent. just googling plants with antifungal effects or similiar terms will only show you very commonly known things a better way would be to type in the latin name of something you have in your house followed by antifungal properties instead of getting blog posts and news articles you'll find yourself actually looking at university released studies on specific plants. much more informative. calamus effectively kills trich and wetspot, kava kava will kill all bacteria, calea is effective in the treatment of cobweb and black mold. a combination approach with selective ingredients is less likely to harm mycelium and allows you only to treat the things your having trouble with because why have protective measures against things that dont even grow in your area?. im not trying to bash your thread or anything i just think its something worth taking into consideration. i have a major in biochemistry if you want to know more about some of the selective options out their id be glad to share what i know.

update: heres some stuff to read calea

calamus

kava

Edited by cheor, 19 October 2010 - 02:59 AM.


#8 Justintime

Justintime

    Justincase

  • OG VIP
  • 1,665 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 03:56 AM

if your using cinnamon in amounts that will stop sores from germinating its too much for the mushrooms to grow. do a little more research on the topic then wikipedia justintime cinnamon at the proper concentrations to inhibit spore growth will burst the cell walls of any higher fungi's mycelium. wanna see some instant bruising put a drop of cinnamon essential oil on a cake and watch as everything for a couple inches around it dies


Cheor , quite frankly at the moment, Im doing my thing with this Cinnamon.
Its good for you and its made from bark. Please let me do my thing and you can start a thread about the volatility of Cinnamon. I eat a spoonful of it a day and even put it in my hot coco. I mix it with a tablespoon of honey and eat it in the morning. If it was that volatile it would be stripped from the shelves under the B>OM>B act I asked people not to post until I had all my info up here, is that too much to ask. Respect. If you wouldnt jump the gun and wait until my pics of healthy mycelium growing on my substrate then you would know without needing to post that the Mycelium is doing fine. Please dont insult my inteligence, I dont use Wikipedia and dont assume I am using essential oil, I am using infusion.

Edited by Justincase, 19 October 2010 - 05:19 AM.


#9 Justintime

Justintime

    Justincase

  • OG VIP
  • 1,665 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 04:19 AM

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Edited by Justincase, 19 October 2010 - 04:27 AM.


#10 Justintime

Justintime

    Justincase

  • OG VIP
  • 1,665 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 04:36 AM

Okay so those are my subs I made using the Cinnamon and Bee pollen on the seventh of October.No contams in the left jar. I did get contams of Trichoderma in the exposed jar but I made up a solution of Cinnamon water/oil by pouring boiling water into a bowl which contained one tablespoon of Cinnamon. The Trich has vanished and the Mycelium is doing fine, it has been tested with peroxide in case it was Cobweb and it is not. The reason the Cinnamon in the sub mix didnt save the sub from Trich initially is because the Cinnamon wasnt exposed to boiling water which releases its compounds. I took the newly made cinnamon juice and filled the jar and left it for an hr. I then turned the jar upside down and drained the excess Cinnamon juice. The jar only had a muslin cloth type top on it ( very course). Last night I emptied the jar as is shown in the pics above. It has been exposed to open air in my room countless times and no contams yet. I have had Trich and Cobweb mold contams in the same area. Later on tonight or tommorrow I will be posting the ingredients I used for the sub.Thanks.P.S if you would like to talk to me about this before I am finished feel free to P.M me as I am trying to keep things neat and in perspective.Peace

Edited by Justincase, 19 October 2010 - 04:43 AM.


#11 Justintime

Justintime

    Justincase

  • OG VIP
  • 1,665 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 05:49 AM

Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image

Edited by Justincase, 19 October 2010 - 06:15 AM.


#12 Justintime

Justintime

    Justincase

  • OG VIP
  • 1,665 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 06:45 AM

I found the above paper after already starting the experiment with Cinnamon. Manuka oil is probably available through Health Food Stores. I expect it is alot more expensive to buy than Cinnamon. I am going to see this experiment through. If it doesnt work out I will be trying the others on the list.

I am making up another batch of substrate tonight so will take step by step pics to upload here.

#13 Justintime

Justintime

    Justincase

  • OG VIP
  • 1,665 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 06:59 AM

Bee pollen is also an additive in my substrate. The way I figure it, most mushrooms have adapted thier fruiting clock according to the seasons, or when the first rains of autumn arrive. The colder times could very well be signaling that the pollen in the air left over from spring and summer is being cleansed from the atmosphere and washed into the soil providing nutrients . It is just a hypothesis but I believe it carries merit. Pollen does carry some fungal spore which is why I make sure I ground it to a powder and add it first into the Cinnamon infusion after it has cooled to avoid enzymes being destroyed and to make sure any unwanted fungal spores are killed by the Cinnamon infusion.




The science involving the study of Bee Pollen is known as Palynology.

Bee Pollen is one of the richest and purest natural foods ever discovered, and the incredible nutritional and medicinal value of pollen has been known for centuries.

Pollen grains contain the male germ cells (elements) that are produced by all plants, flowers or blossoms. This is essential in order to ensure that plant life throughout the world continues by a process involving fertilization and plant embryo formation.

One teaspoonful of pollen contains approximately 1,200 pellets or 2.5 billion grains, each of which has the capacity to supply those factors that are necessary in order to fertilize and reproduce the particular species that it represents (such as a fruit, grain or tree). Pollen is composed of myriads of microspores that are produced in the anthers of flowers and in the cones of conifers. Each grain measures approximately .002 inches in diameter (although the representative diameter is somewhere near one-half millimeter), and each bee-collected pellet contains approximately two million grains of pollen.

Pollination consists of the transfer of pollen from the anther of a stamen to the stigma of a pistil. This, in turn, produces a fertilization of the ovules in the ovary, which subsequently develops into the growth of seeds. A single spike of Ragweed or a single strobile of Pine may produce up to six million grains of pollen, and as many as four million grains may be found in a head of rye. Many plants are pollinated by wind, rain or water-currents, while colorfully attractive or scented flowers containing nectar are largely pollinated by insects (including flies, bees, wasps, butterflies, beetles and moths).

Pollen gathered by bees is superior to that obtained directly from flowering plants. The bees are extremely discriminate about selecting the best pollen from the millions of grains that are present. Of these, only two types are found, namely, anemophile pollen grains (which are not collected by bees, and produce allergic reactions) and entomophile pollen grains (which are collected by bees, and possess greater nutrient content). In actuality, entomophile pollen grains have been employed in the successful treatment of airborn pollen allergies. It is apparent that the bees only select those grains of pollen that are rich in all the nutrients, especially nitrogenous materials. The bees mix the pollen grains with a sticky substance that is secreted from their stomachs, which allows the pollen to adhere to their rear legs in "pollen baskets" in order to safely transport it to their hives.

Many other flowers are also pollinated by certain birds, such as sunbirds, honeycreepers, lorikeets and hummingbirds. Marsupials (such as honey "mice" and bats) will also pollinate certain flowering plants, and even snails have been observed transporting pollen.

Pollens are usually designated by their flower origin in order to establish certain preferences that are dependable. The color and shape usually indicates the species of plant from which it was obtained, as well as the specific geographical region. Although the color of pollen is normally unimportant, it will range from golden yellow to black according to its source. Pollen contains many varieties of pigments, of which only a small number have been isolated. Certain pigments are water-soluble, while others are fat-soluble. This accounts for the many varied colors of honey (including the ambers and greens), and the yellow of beeswax is a fat-soluble pigment.





Pollen contains the richest known source of vitamins, minerals, proteins amino acids, hormones, enzymes and fats, as well as significant quantities of natural antibiotics. Most of the known vitamins in pollen exist in perfect proportion, which further enhances their value.

There exists anywhere from 5,000 to 9,000 micrograms of active carotenoids, which are converted into vitamin A in the body. The carotenoids are available in the pollen of insect-pollinated flowers, but are missing from wind-pollinated species. Carotenoids (Provitamin A) are present in the Lipochrome fraction (which are xanthophyll esters), and may range from 50 to 150 micrograms per gram. The pollens richest in carotene may contain 20 times as much as is present in an equivalent weight of carrots, thereby making pollen a good source of Provitamin A. The carotenoids are usually combined with the outer layer of the pollen grain (the sporonine), but some may also be bound to the protein of the pollen cell. In addition to the class of carotenoids, there is another group of pigments found in pollen, namely, the flavin pigments (flavones, flavonols). Furthermore, cytochromes also occur in pollen.

The following quantity of B-Complex vitamins are found in one gram (1,000 milligrams) of fresh raw pollen:


Vitamin B1 (thiamine) 9.2 mg.
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) 18.5 mg.
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 5.0 mg.
Nicotinic acid 200.0 mg.
Pantothenic acid 27.6 mg.
Folic acid 5.0 mg.



These amounts should be increased by 20 to 25 percent for all varieties of dry pollen. All forms of bee pollen contain higher amounts of vitamins B1, B2 and E than found in fruits, berries and green vegetables.

One gram of fresh raw pollen contains from 7 to 15 mg. of vitamin C, along with traces of vitamin E (tocopherol).

Although vitamin K does not exist in mixed pollens, it is usually found in fermented pollen (bee bread). It is most likely created by bacteria that either accompany or assist in the fermentation process whenever pollen is stored in the cells of the combs. While ordinary pollen gradually deteriorates while in storage, bee bread closely resembles fresh pollen and retains its food value (even after more than two years).

Pollens usually contain as much as 17 milligrams of rutin, although beehive stored pollen may contain up to 13 percent. The richest supply of rutin is found in buckwheat pollen, due to the fact that rutin is derived from buckwheat. Daily consumption of from 60 to 70 grams of pollen is considered safe insofar as the intake of rutin is concerned.

Various other vitamins found in pollen include B5, B12, D, biotin, inositol and PABA.

The mineral content of bee pollen is as follows:


Calcium 1 to 15% of ash
(10.5% average)
Chlorine 1% of ash
Copper .05 to .08% of ash
Iron .01 to .3% of ash
(.07% average)
Magnesium 1 to 12% of ash
(6.7% average)
Manganese 1.4% of ash
Phosphorus 1 to 20% of ash
(13.6% average)
Potassium 20 to 45% of ash
(20.7% average)
Silicon 2 to 10% of ash
Sulfur 1% of ash



The total mineral ash in pollen may vary from 1 to 7 percent (with a mean average of 2.7 percent), which is similar to that of grains and certain seeds.

Bee pollen contains up to 59 different trace minerals, and all minerals found in pollen are present in a highly digestible form.

The protein content of pollen (including certain peptones and gloculins) ranges from 10 to 35 percent (according to its plant origin), with a mean average of 20 percent. Forty to fifty percent of this may be in the form of free amino acids. All pollens contain the exact same number of 22 amino acids, yet different species produce varying amounts. The amino acids found in whole dry pollen fluctuate between 10 and 13 percent (26.88% protein or albuminous substances). This equals from 5 to 7 times the amino acids found in equal weights of beef, milk, eggs or cheese.

The following are protein content comparisons between pollen and "complete protein foods" (100 grams edible portion):


Isoleusine Leusine Lysine Methionine

Meat (beef) 0.93 1.28 1.45 0.42
Eggs 0.85 1.17 0.93 0.39
Cheese 1.74 2.63 2.34 0.80
Pollen 4.50 6.70 5.70 1.82


Phenylalamine Threonine Tryptophane Valine

Meat (beef) 0.66 0.81 0.20 0.91
Eggs 0.69 0.67 0.20 0.90
Cheese 1.43 1.38 0.34 2.05
Pollen 3.90 4.00 1.30 5.70



The quantitative analysis of amino acids (per 100 parts of dry matter) is as follows:


Arginine 5.3% Methionine 1.0%
Histidine 2.5% Phenylalamine 4.1%
Isoleucine 5.1% Threonine 4.1%
Leucine 7.1% Tryptophane 1.4%
Lysine 6.4% Valine 5.8%



These are the amino acids that are most indispensable in our daily diet, and which cannot be manufactured or synthesized in our system. They are also derived from natural sources in a usable form.

Approximately 35 grams of pollen each day will supply all the body's protein requirements. However, only 25 grams of pollen ingested daily will sustain a person in terms of providing sufficient amounts of each of the essential amino acids.

The albuminous substances in bee pollen consist of albumine, globuline, guanine, hypoxanthine, lecithin, nusleine, peptone, vernine and xanthine.

The body will more effectively utilize the protein in food if there is a larger selection of amino acids available.

Bee pollen contains from 10 to 15 percent natural sugars, including fructose, glucose, pentose, raffinose, stachyose and sucrose. These are essentially the same simple natural sugars that are found in honey, and which exist in easily-digested chains and bonds. Many are converted to a predigested form by the enzymatic action of the bee's salivary glands.

The total content of natural sugars in pollen range from 30 to 40 percent; glucose, from 25 to 48 percent; reducing sugars, from 7.5 to 40 percent; and non-reducing sugars, from 0.1 to 19 percent. The non-reducing sugars in the bee-collected pollen average 2.7 percent while the reducing sugars range from 18 to 41 percent, with a mean average of 25 percent. However, the values for both reducing and non-reducing sugars in hand-collected pollen may be approximately the reverse of this. In hand-collected pollen, reducing sugars range from 0 to 7.5 percent and non-reducing sugars may be as much as 22 percent.

Pollen may also contain up to 44 percent of carbohydrates or glucides. The starches found in bee pollen are sometimes combined with other carbohydrates, and may average anywhere from 1 to 22 percent.

The highly-resistant exterior wall membranes of pollen are composed of sporonine and cellulose. This complex carbohydrate is unextractable from pollen, and ranges from 7 to 57 percent in various species.

The undetermined percentages of pollen that remain after the removal of water (or moisture), ash, sugars, starch, protein and ether extracts consist primarily of the pollen shell (or sporonine). This ranges from 21 to 35 percent in bee-collected pollen, with a mean average of 28.55 percent. However, the average is approximately 57 percent for hand-collected pollen.

Although various other extractives may range from 1 to 25 percent in pollen, fats and oils may constitute only 5 percent. In some cases, the levels of fatty acids in pollen are about 5.8 percent. However, hexadecanol has been found in amounts totalling about 0.14 percent of pollen weight. In addition, alpha-amino-butyric acid has been identified in pollen fat. Furthermore, the unsaponifiable fraction of pollen weight may total as much as 2.6 percent.

In addition bee pollen also contains lecithin, amines, nuclein, guanine, xanthine, hypoxanthine, vernine, waxes, gums, resins, hydrocarbons (0.57%), sterols (0.6%), polypeptides, DNA, ribose, desoxyribose, hexuronic acid, vegetable oils (5% average) and various growth factors.

Certain enzymes are also present in pollen, and are the essential biological catalysts during the digestive process (pollen also aids in the proper digestion of other foods). The enzymes found in bee pollen include amylase, catalase, cozymase, cytochrome, dehydrogenase, diaphorase, diastase, lactic acids, pectase and phosphatase. A mixture of fresh pollen may contain anywhere from 500 to 1,000 micrograms of cozymase per gram, which compares favorably with the amounts found in yeast. In addition, the alcoholic fermentation of pollen is identical with that of yeast.

The heating of pollen will destroy the valuable enzymes and vitamin C content.

Fungus spores are sometimes found intermingled with pollen.

The water content of fresh pollen ranges from 3 to 20 percent. This water content must be carefully removed by proper dyhydration methods (dessication) in order to retain its fragile elements, as well as to preserve the total integrity of its properties.

Bee pollen also contains active antibiotic substances that immediately destroy harmful pathogenic bacteria upon contact.

Bee-collected pollen usually contains nectar and saliva. When mixed with honey, this pollen may be stored in comb cells where it undergoes a lactic acid fermentation process in order to produce "bee bread" (which contains high levels of vitamin E and K).

Pollen is superior to both honey and royal jelly, and possesses a similar (but more stable) composition to that of royal jelly. The overall stability of bee pollen is more advantageous when used in dietetics, as well as an effective form of skin care during corrective dermatology. Since pollen contains fatty acids, this may account for its favorable effect upon the skin and dermal tissues. The anti-fungal action in human perspiration is due to the presence of certain fatty acids such as caprylic, propionic and undecyclenic acids.

Many of the active ingredients in bee pollen consist of substances (such as hormones) that accelerate plant growth.





Many universities and colleges throughout the world are discovering the mounting evidence of high performance levels associated with the use of bee pollen.

Pythagoras, Hippocrates, Pliny and Virgil all referred to pollen's substantial rejuvenating power, as well as its ability to retard aging.

Russia's known centenarians were usually beekeepers whose diets included large amounts of "scrap" honey, which is a pollen-saturated honey residue salvaged from the bottom of beehives.

Bee pollen has a dramatic effect upon mental perception during athletic performances.

The I.Q.'s of children have been doubled during documented clinical tests, and resistance to stress has been significantly increased in both animals and humans.

Experiments by French doctors have revealed that pollen contains both natural antibiotic properties and significant growth factors. Bee pollen was used solely as a source of nutrients for prolonged periods (6 months), and displayed extremely successful results in terms of growth promotion. This growth factor usually varies according to the quantity of pollen ingested, and often produces an acceleration of growth.

The ingestion of pollen on a regular basis for a healthy person will usually accomplish the following:

1. Protect against any insufficiencies in vitamins, minerals and amino acids --- especially during pregnancy, lactation, and intensive physical or mental work.

2. Permit achievement of optimal physical and intellectual output.

3. Provide greater reinforcement to the body during its resistance towards any external aggression.

4. Forestall any internal metabolic disorders that eventually generate various disease-conditions.

Pollen provides those chemical substances from which are created glands, muscles, hair and vital organs. In addition, it also furnishes those essential materials that are necessary for the repair of any worn-out cells or tissues.

Bee pollen also produces regulatory (amphoteric) activity upon the gastro-intestinal functions, both in relation to chronic constipation and certain cases of diarrhea that are highly resistant to synthetic antibiotic therapy. Furthermore, pollen regulates the intestines by destroying or weakening any harmful bacteria while simultaneously promoting the growth of health-giving species (intestinal flora).

Bee Pollen is extremely valuable as an adaptogen by assisting in both weight gain or loss, as well as in the reduction of hypertension or increasing the overall metabolic functions. Bee Pollen both regulates and stimulates the metabolism in the human organism by supplying the missing factors (or catalysts) that other foods do not provide while neutralizing the catabolic effects of various toxins, environmental pollutants, synthetic drugs or food additives, thereby producing healthier cells, improved health and well-being and a longer life-span.

Pollen enhances the metabolism by creating endless chain reactions throughout the entire system. The essential minerals and other natural elements in bee pollen act as catalysts, and are responsible for the assimilation of that portion of foods which would normally have been eliminated without yielding the energy, essential nutrients and other benefits (which usually occurs on a regular basis with most adulterated foods).

Bee Pollen accelerates the normal cellular processes throughout the entire organism, and acts as a catalyst in order to stimulate intercellular metabolic activities without profoundly modifying normal physiological activity.

The overall effects of pollen are multiple, i.e., it does not appear to possess only one specific physiological function but, rather, activates the systemic biological functions.

Elements that exist in microgram quantities (such as those found in Bee Pollen) can interact with co-enzymes as catalysts, or can act synergistically (i.e., the elements' action combined is greater than the sum of their actions taken separately).

During many years of testing, pollen has been notable for its lack of harmful side-effects. Few medications rank with bee pollen in terms of its lack of toxicity. It is a completely natural product that is well tolerated by the body and compatible with all other forms of therapy. In addition, it is easy to digest and suitable for all ages. Furthermore, it provides increased protection and greater resistance against any invasive or harmful pathogenic bacteria, and provides increased and sustainable energy-levels throughout the entire organism.

There are approximately 35,000 miles of capillaries in the human body, and pollen assists in the elimination of sludge and other waste materials that constantly accumulates in these ducts (due to stress from modern living habits, processed foods, synthetic drugs and environmental pollutants). If only a fraction of an inch of these 35,000 miles of ducts should burst in the brain, it could be fatal or else produce partial or total paralysis for the remainder of the lifespan.

Rutin is a glucoside that provides increased resistance to the walls of the capillaries, and its primary duty is to reinforce the general resistance throughout the entire capillary system. Rutin protects the entire organism against capillary permeability resulting from excessive radiation of x-rays or consecutive histamine injections. The richest supply of rutin is found in buckwheat pollen.

Rutin is especially beneficial to the intellectual functions, as well as in conditions involving cerebral hemorrhage or heart disorders. The actions of rutin are also vascular and slightly hypotensive, and it also acts as a diuretic. Rutin also diminishes the time of bleeding within proportions of from 30 to 40 percent, as well as shortens coagulation time. Furthermore, it corrects the capillary fragility during parturition while preventing meningeal hemorrhages in infants. Capillary resistance in pregnant women is improved by 60 percent within 10 days of the initial adminstration of rutin.

In convalescents, bee pollen creates a rapid increase in both weight and energy-levels, and from 1 to 3 tablespoonsful should be taken daily by invalids or those in a poor state of health who require total rejuvenation (such as the elderly).

Pollen is also successful in treating hypertonic illness, as well as disorders of the nervous or endocrine glandular systems. It produces the desired stabilizing effects of either increasing low blood pressure or reducing high blood pressure. In addition, it provides a calming and tranquilizing (sedative) effect without any contraindications or harmful side-effects.

Bee pollen is highly recommended for both mentally-retarded and anemic children, as well as for those suffering from rickets. Test results indicate a significant increase in red blood corpuscles (up to 30 percent) and an increase in the hemoglobin count (averaging about 15 percent). When these children are given supplementary doses of pollen and glutamic acid, their overall improvement is drmatically accelerated. The action of glutamic acid reacts directly upon the brown cells of the brain. Improvement is generally observed within the first 6 months, and reaches its peak towards the end of one year. The prescribed dosage is approximately 4 grams, 3 times a day.

Pollen contains large quantities of acetylcholine, which plays a varied and important role in the functional capabilities of the entire organism by provoking increased adrenaline secretions. It also acts as a chemical mediator for the transmission of nerve impulses, which may indicate why pollen stimulates increased glandular secretions while acting as a tonic to the entire nervous system.

By stimulating the secretion of hormones from the adrenal cortex, bee pollen assists in regulating (1) salt and water metabolism, (2) neuromuscular function, (3) carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism, (4) resistance to many physical and chemical agents or infections, and (5) increased activity upon hair growth, skin and sexual functions (including the improvement of secondary sexual characteristics).

Pollen also stimulates both adrenal and liver secretions in order to allow the liver to secrete additional quantities of glycoge, thereby elevating the blood sugar levels (which greatly benefits those with symptoms of hypoglycemia).

Allergy attacks brought on by pollen are normally produced by wind-carried pollens, and not by bee-collected pollens. Wind-generated pollens usually stimulate a cleansing process throughout the entire respiratory tract, especially among those who consume excessive quantities of mucus-producing foods during the winter months.

Bee pollen may be safely administered by everyone, even those persons who are prone to allergies such as hayfever, as they will usually suffer no ill-effects. Allergenic properties are always neutralized by the nectar and enzymes secreted by the bees. Raw honey has been specifically recommended by many professional allergists as having an immunizing effect upon the majority of pollen-stimulated allergies. This is usually a direct result of the pollen and related substances that are found in both unfiltered and uncooked honey which, when ingested, form a natural oral immunization against allergies.

In Sweden, pollen extracts or concentrates are obtained from two different types of extracts, namely (1) hydrosoluble cernitin (T60), and (2) lipoidsoluble cernitin (GBX1). There are 60 mg. of cernitin T60 and 3 mg. of cernitin GBX1 in "cernilton", which is unsurpassed in preventing and reducing common virus infections and related infectious conditions (due to its interferon activity). These pollen extracts are capable of penetrating cell walls, thereby being directly absorbed into the cells. This allows them to directly stimulate interferon production, thereby increasing the normal resistance against virus attacks (such as influenza and other viral infections). Vaccines are ususally only effective against viral attack from one specific virus, however, protection is normally afforded against most types of viruses when the cells are stimulated to produce interferon. Bee pollen also produces significant increases in both leukocytes and epitrocytes. The natural antibiotics found in pollen (of which penicillin is merely a prototype) will prevent the growth of certain microorganisms.

Additional medical properties found in pollen include: (1) bacteriostatic (arrests the growth of harmful pathogenic bacteria), (2) cytophylactic and cytotoxic (cellular defense against infection and toxins), and (3) anti-anorexic (stimulates increased appetite, but only for those who lack it).

Pollen is highly successful in removing the symptoms of vegetative dystonia accompanied by a predominance of thyrogenous symptoms.

Bee pollen also displays an effect similar to that of the drug amphetamine in that it acts as a "psycho-tonic". However, it does not manifest any depressive side-effects.

Pollen allows significantly increased amounts of oxygen to reach the brain and the cells in general, thereby resulting in improved overall health and mental capabilities.

Pollen will also accelerate increased tissue repair throughout the entire organism, thereby making it extremely effective in the removal of scar tissue following surgical operations.

Bee pollen displays amphoteric (regulatory) properties in order to restore equilibrium and harmony to all the bodily functions.

Pollen will reduce any excess body weight during conditions involving obesity or overweight, while increasing body weight during any underweight conditions.

Bee pollen is extremely effective in small doses, and its overall effects are usually quite prolonged.

When employed either alone or combined with other therapies, pollen has been extremely successful for the following ailments or disease-conditions:


Acne Infartus
Aging (premature) Infections
Alcoholism Infection, Intestinal
Anemia Insomnia
Angina Pectoris Instability
Anorexia Intestinal Disorders
Anxietyleukemia Intestines, Inflamed
Appetite, loss of Jaundice
Arteriosclerosis Kwashiorkor
Asthma Leukemia
Atherosclerosis Liver Disorders
Brain Infection Longevity
Bronchitis Measles
Buerger's Disease Memory, Loss of
Burns and Scalds Menopause
Cancer Mental Retardation
Capillary Fragility Migraine Headaches
Cardiovascular Dis. Mucus, Bloody
Cavities Multiple Sclerosis
Cerebral Hemorrhage Nervous Disorders
Climacteric Disorders Neurasthenia
Colitis Parkinson's Disease
Convalescence Premature/Malnourished
Constipation, Chronic Protatitis, Chronic
Debility, General Psycho-Neuralgic Disorders
Depression Psychosis
Diabetes Pyelonephritis
Diarrhea, Chronic Pyurea (Pus in Urine)
Diverticulosis, Sigma- Rheumatism, Articular
Dysuria Rheumatoid Arthritis
Enteritis Rickets
Enterorenal Disorders Sexual Disorders
Enuresis Sinusitis
Fatigue (Ocular) Stress, Effects of
Fever, Intermittent Teeth, Impaired Growth of
Flatulence Tuberculosis
Gangrenous Wounds Ulcers (Digestive/Peptic)
Growth (Stunted) Urinary Disorders
Hair Loss Weakness, Bodily
Hayfever Weight Gain
Headaches, Chronic Weight Loss
Impotence Withdrawal Symptoms



Bee pollen also greatly assists the following physiological functions:

accelerates the growth of healthy new cells
promotes increased tissue repair
enhances greater toxic elimination
reduces excessive cholesterol levels
increases low blood pressure
reduces high blood pressure
promotes increased resistance to infection
activates the glands of internal secretion
stimulates increased gastric secretory flows
stabilizes the entire nervous system
improves fertility in women
retards the growth of benign or malignant tumors
eliminates excessive calcium deposits
expels excessive uric acid accumulations
shortens the convalescence time-period
restores normal and healthy appetites
promotes increased growth of skin tissue
counteracts skin wrinkling
regulates all the systemic biological functions
increases calmness and relaxation
retards normal aging effects
promotes increased concentration/memory improvement
retards premature senility
prolongs youthfulness
enhances sexual activity
promotes increased strength, vigor and vitality
provides increased stamina, endurance and energy-levels
promotes a more optimistic outlook on life
provides an overall feeling of well-being





Bees usually secrete a substance from their stomachs in order to allow the individual pollen granules to stick together and eventually form pellets that will adhere to their rear legs ("pollen baskets"). This secretion will transform the various pollens into an active product containing different forms of diastase.

Pollen grains are intricately designed so that they become virtually immune from decay under certain anaerobic conditions. Pollen must be completely dehydrated in order to prevent spoilage. Air-dried pollen will eventually wrinkle, and its nutritive value will decline with age. However, "bee bread" pollen closely resembles fresh pollen in both appearance and food value even after 1 or 2 years.

Pollen/honey cakes can be created by kneading six or seven layers of pollen and honey together, and then spreading it out to dry thoroughly. It is then sliced into strips (roughly 5 inches long) and allowed to dry for from 3 to 4 days, and then stored for future use as survival food during famines, crop failures or drought.

By combining the pollen with the honey, the pollen becomes incapable of deterioration or decay while it is immersed within the honey. Bacteria cannot thrive in a honey medium, due to its hygroscopic (anti-moisture) properties. By storing this combination of pollen and honey beneath a pyramid structure, both the pollen and honey will remain pure and intact for many years through a process known as mummification.

It is possible to imitate the bee's method of storing pollen by creating an artificial form of "bee bread". This is accomplished by dissolving 15 pounds of honey into 25 pounds of water, which is brought to a boil and then immediately cooled. Add 100 pounds of air-dried pollen to this solution. The resultant blend is mixed and kneaded by hand or with a suitable blender, and is then placed into a crock jar where it is lightly tamped. The contents are covered with a wooden disk supporting a stone weight. After standing at a temperature of from 96 to 97 degrees Fahrenheit for from 4 to 6 days, the wooden disk and weight are removed. The crock is then sealed with a melted mixture of one part beeswax and three parts paraffin. This jar is then stored in a cool, dry place.

The maximum amount of pollen that can be collected from a single beehive is approximately 200 grams (one gram comprises 125 pellets). By placing a five-pound jar of honey inside the hive, the amount of pollen that can be harvested will nearly double. This five-pound container allows the bees to have a constant supply of honey readily available to supply the needs of their colony, thereby allowing them to devote more time and energy in the search for pollen.

Bees will not only avoid toxic plants (including those sprayed with harmful pesticides), but they also seek those plants that contain the highest nutritional values.

It is impossible to remove too much pollen from the ecological system. The more pollen that is harvested allows even more to be produced, so this is one of the most productive cycles in existence.

A dosage of from 15 to 20 grams (one-half ounce) will usually meet the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for adults. Approximately 30 to 32 grams are necessary in order to anabolically strengthen and tone a person, whereas anywhere from 15 to 20 grams are essential for the proper maintenance of good health in active adults.

Children from 3 to 5 years of age require 12 grams of pollen, while those from 6 to 12 years need 16 grams daily.

The daily dose can be increased up to 35 grams (1 ounce equals 28 grams), considering the differences in age, weight and overall state of health. This dosage will also provide greater preventative maintenance against a lack of essential amino acids.

Do not begin using bee pollen with a dose larger than 1 tablespoonful, twice a day. After one week, gradually increase the dosage from 1 tablespoonful up to 4 tablespoonfuls (1 tablespoonful equals approximately one-fourth ounce). One ounce of bee pollen (4 tablespoonfuls) is equivalent to three cooked meals in terms of nutrient content.

While this small dosage acts as a mild hypotensive, it also possesses stimulant properties and may upset your gastro-intestinal system if taken in large quantities during the initial stages (due to its powerful cleansing effects).

Pollen should be ingested preferably on an empty stomach, and there is no danger of toxicity from ingesting it (as it is an unadulterated product).

Pollen gathered for human consumption requires careful processing techniques, including drying, cleaning and sorting. Bee pollen should be selected for its quality and flavor, especially since the amount of flavor in any given food usually determines the levels of nutrient content. Proper processing requires meticulous handling, and poor quality pollens (that are inexpensively priced) should always be avoided. The overall taste of bee pollen ranges from bitter to sweet, depending upon the particular variety or species of flower from which it was obtained.

Pollen should be kept refrigerated or stored in a cool, dry place at all times in order to protect its vital qualities. Cooking is not advisable, due to the destruction of essential enzymes caused by excessive heat.

Bee pollen should be consumed in its pure form at least 30 minutes before meals, especially if it is being used for the purpose of losing excess weight. It can also be mixed with honey, thereby producing a candy substitute if made into cakes and dried under direct sunlight. Pollen also becomes a healthy substitute for mother's milk when combined with nut milks, such as almond milk. It can also be blended into fruit or vegetable dressing, or you can dissolve pollen in your favorite herb tea, fruit or vegetable juice (e.g., pineapple and tomato juice blend well together). Pollen may also be sprinkled onto ice cream, granola, sandwiches or salads, or take a banana and dip it directly into the pollen. You may also wish to dissolve 1 teaspoonful of pollen and 1 teaspoonful of honey in a cup of hot water and drink before breakfast.

Pollen may be consumed in its natural pellet form, or it may be pulverized by the use of a blender or coffee grinder in order to incorporate it into butter, jam, or a mixture of butter and honey.

Bee Pollen should never be purchased in powder, tablet or capsule form, as any commercial pulverizing process of pollen is usually accompanied by a certain amount of adulteration.

Pollen will usually ferment within 24 hours if it is moist and not refrigerated.

Heat will normally decrease the health value of bee pollen, as is the case with nearly all foods.




Vitamins Mg Per Oz.
Vitamin A Alpha .31/Beta .122
Vitamin B1 .198
Vitamin B2 .459
Vitamin B3 2.551
Vitamin B6 .119
Vitamin B12 .00002
Vitamin C 1.304
Vitamins Mg Per Oz.
Vitamin A Alpha .31/Beta .122
Vitamin B1 .198
Vitamin B2 .459
Vitamin B3 2.551
Vitamin B6 .119
Vitamin B12 .00002
Vitamin C 1.304
Barium .136
Boron .604
Calcium 42.383
Chromium .010
Copper .221
Iodine 6.237 mcg
Iron 2.118
Magnesium 27.675
Manganese 1.395
Phosphorus 121.706
Potassium 158.675
Sodium 2.693
Strontium .094
Zinc 1.460

Miscellaneous
Carbohydrates 5.15 grams
Fiber 1.02 grams
Reducing Sugars 8.25 grams
Ash .65 grams

Enzymes Units Per Gram
Amylase 2.550
Lipase .085
Protease 64.400

Amino Acids Mgs Per Oz.
Alanine 309.560
Arginine 292.520
Aspartic 542.440
Cystine 36.855
Glycine 267.520
Glutamic 585.040
Histidine 138.590
Isoleucine 230.040
Leucine 377.720
Lysine 366.360
Methionine 94.004
Phenylalanine 236.850
Proline 505.520
Serine 289.680
Threonine 236.856
Tryptophan 49.700
Tyrosine 139.440
Valine 280.592

Protein 7.1 Grams Per Oz.
Calories .90 Per Oz.
FattyAcids 2.807 Grams/Oz.
Cholesterol 0 Percent

#14 Justintime

Justintime

    Justincase

  • OG VIP
  • 1,665 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 07:59 AM

My size 31 canning jar substrate will consist of Maize flower( cornflower). Fine wood shavings, Vermiculite, Honey, Bee Pollen and a strained liquid infusion of Cinnamon powder. I will post the measurements after I make up the sub and post pics.
I intend to firstly make up my infusion of Cinnamon and hot water, then allow it to cool to warm temps before adding my ground Bee pollen and honey. I will add this to my already mixed wood shavings and Maize flour. I will explain my methods for creating a good breathable mix of all ingredients. Also I will be posting pics of my current sub up to fruiting time plus dunking the sub in Cinnamon infusion and misting with water that has been allowed to sit with a piece of pure silver immersed within.
And also pics of how my new sub is going. Feel free to post Thanks for allowing me to put down all the info I thought was necessary.

#15 Bulk

Bulk

    Plausibly Deniable

  • Expired Member
  • 2,043 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 08:24 AM

I intend to firstly make up my infusion of Cinnamon and hot water, then allow it to cool to warm temps before adding my ground Bee pollen and honey. I will add this to my already mixed wood shavings and Maize flour..


Man, if you're experiment fails, you can always eat the sub....
Brings a whole new meaning to the word "Cake"

Seriously though.
I hope it does work.
I've got my doubts, but I'd love to see it through as well.
I mean how else are discoveries made?
:headbang::eusa_clap

#16 Justintime

Justintime

    Justincase

  • OG VIP
  • 1,665 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 10:40 AM

Man, if you're experiment fails, you can always eat the sub....
Brings a whole new meaning to the word "Cake"

Seriously though.
I hope it does work.
I've got my doubts, but I'd love to see it through as well.
I mean how else are discoveries made?
:headbang::eusa_clap


Thanks Bro, I had that same thought, minus the wood shavings and verm I could eat that sucker :eusa_droo

#17 jimbojones

jimbojones

    Just some Dude

  • Expired Member
  • 409 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 01:47 PM

Cheor , quite frankly at the moment, Im doing my thing with this Cinnamon.
If it was that volatile it would be stripped from the shelves under the B>OM>B act I asked people not to post until I had all my info up here, is that too much to ask. Respect. If you wouldnt jump the gun and wait until my pics of healthy mycelium growing on my substrate then you would know without needing to post that the Mycelium is doing fine. Please dont insult my inteligence, I dont use Wikipedia and dont assume I am using essential oil, I am using infusion.


WHoah! Were just having an intelligent post conversation here. Nobody is pissing in your cheerios. And Volatile Oils are what give things there smell, they are not dangerous and in every spice out there. Volatile just means it goes readily into vapor at room temp, not that it is explosive or harmful, so of course they would not be pulled from the supermarket shelves.

That being said, I love what you're doing. This is science, trial and error is the only true science. Make proper notes and keep us posted! Awesome job.
:headbang:

#18 cheor

cheor

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 19 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 02:51 PM

WHoah! Were just having an intelligent post conversation here. Nobody is pissing in your cheerios. And Volatile Oils are what give things there smell, they are not dangerous and in every spice out there. Volatile just means it goes readily into vapor at room temp, not that it is explosive or harmful, so of course they would not be pulled from the supermarket shelves.

That being said, I love what you're doing. This is science, trial and error is the only true science. Make proper notes and keep us posted! Awesome job.
:headbang:

agreed.

#19 iamsmiley

iamsmiley

    the ice woman

  • Expired Member
  • 1,766 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 06:20 PM

if your using cinnamon in amounts that will stop sores from germinating its too much for the mushrooms to grow. do a little more research on the topic then wikipedia justintime cinnamon at the proper concentrations to inhibit spore growth will burst the cell walls of any higher fungi's mycelium. wanna see some instant bruising put a drop of cinnamon essential oil on a cake and watch as everything for a couple inches around it dies

hydrogen peroxide also kills spores but does little harm to mycelium and has found many uses in mycology.its been used for sterilization of substrates, control of bacteria in agar,and getting rid of cobweb.

you'd think the purpose of volatile oils in plants would be to attract or repel things like insects.volatile oils could also be used by the plant to inhibit bacteria and molds like how cedar does.i think this is a great idea justin but i do wonder how cost effective it would be for growers of buttons and oysters that have a low shelf cost at the grocery store.i think mycology as a whole is missing out on something nature knows about trich.maybe your onto something.do your research...and let us know your findings, if you may.

#20 Justintime

Justintime

    Justincase

  • OG VIP
  • 1,665 posts

Posted 19 October 2010 - 08:32 PM

hydrogen peroxide also kills spores but does little harm to mycelium and has found many uses in mycology.its been used for sterilization of substrates, control of bacteria in agar,and getting rid of cobweb.

you'd think the purpose of volatile oils in plants would be to attract or repel things like insects.volatile oils could also be used by the plant to inhibit bacteria and molds like how cedar does.i think this is a great idea justin but i do wonder how cost effective it would be for growers of buttons and oysters that have a low shelf cost at the grocery store.i think mycology as a whole is missing out on something nature knows about trich.maybe your onto something.do your research...and let us know your findings, if you may.


Thanks Smiley, Peroxide is a good thing, but expensive when I look at how many times I went through bottles of it in just my first two tries at growing. It does'nt kill Trichoderma which is why I searched for something tht would kill both. I had a small tub overtaken by Cobweb which I immersed in Cinnamon tea. The Cobweb vanished although I ended up using that sub in my woodie bed so I never saw it through. Its proven to me so far to be very good at ridding Trich as the exposed jar above had Trich in around six places, I filled the sub jar with the Cinnamon infusion and it has been around a week and a half and the Trich hasnt come back. That sub's ingredients included cinnamon powder but I used water to make the mix. Having not exposed the Cinnamon to boiling water its antibacterial qualities werent released . I have seen fresh Cinnamon sticks going for $37 dollars a kilo on Ebay.

Edited by Justincase, 19 October 2010 - 08:41 PM.





Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!