Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Garden? What do you recommend?


  • Please log in to reply
28 replies to this topic

#1 Mermaidia

Mermaidia

    Sober Sister

  • Expired Member
  • 4,173 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 02:50 PM

This year I am going to have a nice garden if it kills me. I am definitely planting, corn, green beans, tomatoes, beets, carrots, cucumbers, and green/red peppers. I know for sure I am going to grow bush beans instead of pole beans. I would like to grow some lettuce too. I just don't know where to start in regards to the lettuce.

So tell me what are your favorite brands of seeds? Variations? What lettuce would you grow?

Any gardening secrets you want to share? I'd love to hear them!

#2 curandZero

curandZero

    VIP Member

  • OG VIP
  • 341 posts

Donator

Posted 20 January 2011 - 03:18 PM

I grow (and consume) a lot of lettuce so I have one whole space dedicated to successive plantings starting in April and ending in late August; this gives me the opportunity to harvest right up until around Xmas, using row covers once the air turns frosty. I really like the "Italianischer" lettuce that Territorial sells. The other thing I'd really recommend for lettuce is using shade covers during the hottest time of the summer; it makes a big difference.

I think your plans are quite ambitious! I think I'd try to grow more of less varieties rather than have to balance the needs of so many different types of vegetables, but if you've got the time and some help, go for it!

Edited by Bobcat, 20 January 2011 - 05:06 PM.
non-sponsors


#3 myceliummatt

myceliummatt

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 289 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 03:25 PM

Nice! I was just thinking about the up coming gardening season.

As far as lettuce go's sky's the limit. There are a lot of different cultivars out there to choose from. I am not sure what zone you live in but I would base my selections around the type of growing season you have. For example if you live in a climate that can get very warm choose ones that take the heat better without bolting.

I like mesculn mixes myself. You can sow theses successively every ten days for a nice constant supply of lettuce. There are spicy mixes, herbal mixes which have basil, borage, sweet fennel and other tasty herbs mixed in. Some are better to be sown mid-summer others early summer to late summer.

In terms of just growing heads of a specific variety I like the Red Oak leaf (Lactuca sativa ' Red Oakleaf') lettuce. It withstands the heat without getting bitter.


Also look for long grown heirloom variety's. Black-seeded Simpson(Lactuca sativa 'Black-seeded Simpson') lettuce comes to mind as a good one.

Good luck and happy gardening. I can't wait to get my hands in soil again. Although I still have four months before I can get anything outside.

#4 Mermaidia

Mermaidia

    Sober Sister

  • Expired Member
  • 4,173 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 03:26 PM

I've got plenty of help. ;) I'm getting the kids involved this summer and CM too. (He just doesn't know it yet) :lol:

My goal is to supplement as many vegetables we can that we would normally purchase from the grocery. I love organic, but just cannot afford the prices. I feel like I need to connect to mother earth. I want my children to learn to use the resources of the land too.

#5 myceliummatt

myceliummatt

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 289 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 03:32 PM

If you can get a soil test done I would recommend doing so. That way you can add the organic nutrients that your soil may be lacking. It is very helpful to know the make up of your soil.

#6 Bobcat

Bobcat

    Selah!

  • Expired Member
  • 3,573 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 04:53 PM

Merm, if you grow heirloom varieties, you can let some of your plants to age and bolt, and spread the seed in the fall. Then you can have a perrenial lettuce bed.

I've grown very good lettuce in fair shade, so if you got a bad corner in your garden, that's a good spot for lettuce!

No zuchinni? I love that stuff. The bread! The young ones raw! And you can dry chips and flour them for a low carb flour alternative....

#7 TastyBeverage

TastyBeverage

    Goodbye Ofelia

  • Expired Member
  • 5,229 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 05:02 PM

No zuchinni? I love that stuff. The bread! The young ones raw! And you can dry chips and flour them for a low carb flour alternative....


You can also use strips of zucchini to replace lasagna noodles for a low carb/gluten free alternative in lasagna. :) And baby zucchini and yellow squash cooked with a spoonful of bacon drippings and diced onions make a killer breakfast scramble.

#8 Bobcat

Bobcat

    Selah!

  • Expired Member
  • 3,573 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 05:13 PM

zucchini lasagna? I love it!

#9 Ben Dover

Ben Dover

    VIP Member

  • Expired Member
  • 1,918 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 07:57 PM

Do you want head lettuce or leaf? Iceberg for the heading kind and Black Seeded Simpson for the leaf are what I like to grow.

Allstar Gourmet Mix lettuce is an excellent choice too. It has about 12 different kinds that look pretty and taste wonderful.

I'm guessing your breaking up new ground this year?

#10 Mermaidia

Mermaidia

    Sober Sister

  • Expired Member
  • 4,173 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 09:23 PM

Definitely leaf lettuce.

I totally forgot about zucchini! I love it. I made some bread last year and it was awesome. Definitely will add it to my list. Thanks!

#11 SilvrHairDevil

SilvrHairDevil

    Gatekeeper

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 5,838 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 09:24 PM

Don't give up too quick on pole beans. Aside from being awesome in chili, you can do anything with them that you can with bush beans, without as much bending over

Try growing some sunflowers. They plant early and, by the time they're 5 ft or so, you can plant the faster-growing runner beans at their base and the beans will climb the sunflowers, which looks freakin' cool.

Broccoli is a good veggie to grow - it will seed itself and take over a patch of garden.

#12 Mermaidia

Mermaidia

    Sober Sister

  • Expired Member
  • 4,173 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 09:54 PM

When I bought seeds last year I bought pole beans. Man they were all over the place. It was my first year growing them. I mowed over half, lol. Needless to say, I didn't get too many beans. :lol:
So,this year I'm gonna try bush beans. Maybe I will plant some of each.

#13 narashima jaya

narashima jaya

    ॐ jai shivshakti माँ

  • Expired Member
  • 325 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 10:01 PM

i grew bush beans last year. they still spread out some but are way better than the pole version.. i grow alot of eggplant and yellow tomatoes(less acidic). thisyear im starting to grow my black walnut grove. i harvested all the seeds last year and made walnut tinture out of the husks very good for many ailments and skin disorders. in 15 years the trees can be harvested for a hefty chunk of change!!

#14 Mermaidia

Mermaidia

    Sober Sister

  • Expired Member
  • 4,173 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 10:09 PM

My father in law has a huge walnut tree. Id love hear more about using walnuts.

#15 Ben Dover

Ben Dover

    VIP Member

  • Expired Member
  • 1,918 posts

Posted 20 January 2011 - 11:00 PM

When I bought seeds last year I bought pole beans. Man they were all over the place. It was my first year growing them. I mowed over half, lol. Needless to say, I didn't get too many beans. :lol:
So,this year I'm gonna try bush beans. Maybe I will plant some of each.


If you consider growing them again, plant them at the base of a pole or trellis so they grow up instead of out. These guys will climb where you have to use a ladder to pick em all if you give them enough to climb that high :)

For bush beans, Strike or Topcrop are my favorite. Great flavor and their stringless which makes snapping easier.

What zone are you in? You might be able to go ahead and start somethings inside and outside from seed.

#16 Bobcat

Bobcat

    Selah!

  • Expired Member
  • 3,573 posts

Posted 21 January 2011 - 12:38 AM

My father in law has a huge walnut tree. Id love hear more about using walnuts.


Easy to grow, and if you got squirrels, you'll have a forest in no time, lol. We have so many that we are considering digging them up and selling them, lol.

Blacks take quite a bit of work and are damn messy. Other varieties less so. My favorite in the family is the hickory, awesome flavor, but a low meat to work ratio. Thumbs up for english walnuts!!!!

But whatever you do, keep them away from anywhere you'd like to grow veggies. They have a chemical in them called jugalone or something like that. Chemical warfare. Smart for a tree.

#17 Justintime

Justintime

    Justincase

  • OG VIP
  • 3,058 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 21 January 2011 - 12:58 AM

Snake beans (vine) are awesome if you can get seed, they give so much food! Very long thin pods almost like spaghetti, you can eat them in a tomatoe base sauce or cut them up and snap freeze them. Zuccini give loads too and make great soup. Im getting hungry.

#18 toadshroom

toadshroom

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 490 posts

Posted 21 January 2011 - 02:04 AM

I'm going to start a garden this spring too.
I'm thinking of pretty much the same veggies as you.

I would recommend looking up companion gardening and permaculture...I'm really getting into it.
And especially if you're wanting to establish a closer relationship with mother nature, I think permaculture is where it's at.

Try growing some herbs too. Garlic and many members of the mint family are great at thwarting harmful insects, and there's many more too.

Some pairings of plants can increase yields even.
I've never tried it, but i've been researching a lot, and i'm very excited to see this snow though so I can get things ready. :)

#19 toadshroom

toadshroom

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 490 posts

Posted 21 January 2011 - 02:16 AM

Oh, Kale is great too. Lettuce like kinda. Do a google on it...lots of good nutes for you.

#20 Sidestreet

Sidestreet

    Digging for Rainbows

  • App Administrator
  • 9,108 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 21 January 2011 - 05:41 AM

I just don't know where to start in regards to the lettuce.


If you want to have a steady supply of fresh, tender, nutritious greens for salads I recommend going the baby greens route.

Basically you grow everything for the salad only to a few inches high before mowing it down with a pair of scissors.

There are many good things that can go into this kind of salad: spinach, uncountable varieties of lettuces, sprouts, kale, mustard and beet greens, arugula... the list goes on.

I recommend buying from Johnny's Selected Seeds, where you can find many "micro" mixes, lettuces, etc. etc. etc.

What you do is sow all your selected ingredients in one patch (only a little row-space is needed per succession), then seed the next about three weeks later, and the next three weeks later, etc. As the greens become ready (about three-five inches high) you harvest. They will grow back (kinda like mushrooms) a few times before getting bitter. And when they're bitter, your next patch is ready to go!

Also, I'm with Ben Dover on the All-Star mix. However, I like to grow some of the other stuff to add to it until you have a salad, or "mesclun" mix that you'd pay dearly for in a high-class restaurant.

I f-ing love gardening!!!!

I'm so stoked that people are thinking about gardening again!




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!