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Self Sustainable Farming


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#1 DrunkinMaster

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 08:32 PM

Hey everyone. Never really been to this side of the forum, nothing ever called for it until now! I've been increasingly unhappy with veggies on the market today. So i've decided to take matters into my own hands. Now, as cultivation is easy enough, my main discussion focus is breading.

Here's a small part of the list of veggies i've obtained seeds for.

Bell pepper
Cucumber
Eggplant
Squash
Sweet corn
Capsicum
Tomatillo
Tomato
Winter melon[conditions may not be able to cultivate.]
Cucumis anguria
Zucchini
Artichoke
Broccoli
Cauliflower
Green bean
common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris
lima bean
Peanut
Asparagus
Celery
Onion
Carrot
Ginger
Parsley
Potato ;Sweet potatos
Yam
Brussels sprout
Cabbage
Chard
Lettuce
Pea
Spinach

Now all of these have a wikipedia page which is where i'm going to start. I want to be able to continue the species of each, as in I don't want to have to go to the store every year to produce seeds, i want to make my own. hence, the name, 'self sustainable'

And there is another thing in particular that im extremely interested in is breading corn. Does anyone have experience in this or any type of breading?
Now, i have never grown corn, so im heading to the library tomorrow to get some books on agriculture.

Sorry i know this seems more like gardening then true farming..as i have no animals but it's gonna get pretty huge in space. I'm about to have a lot of land to do this on.
Any help, opinions, constructive criticism is welcome.:bow:

#2 mycowarrier

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 02:55 PM

Wow that's alot of veggies there DM :amazed:
Do you plan on going organic or the commercial way with pesticides and chemical fertilizers? I hope you choose organic :thumbup:
I have some horse radish growing from store bought roots. There are some many veggies you can start that way and get seeds from them too. G-luck!

#3 Kronos

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 02:59 PM

what sort of climate are you in?

It would be a idea to have a few animals, to dispose of the waste greens, and to have manure for nutrients replacement, like a goat or pony.

Also my advice would be to start with a hand full of varieties and gradually increase them year by year.

Hope all goes to plan for you.

#4 pinehunter

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 03:17 PM

Sounds great. I love to grow things and wish I could do it effectively where I live now. In the fall the air close to the ground gets cold and damp leading to wilting. I'd need to construct cold frames or build a small greenhouse to grow most of the more desirable veggies. Hope you get a good return.:eusa_clap

#5 SilvrHairDevil

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 06:05 PM

...It would be a idea to have a few animals, to dispose of the waste greens, and to have manure for nutrients replacement, like a goat or pony.


I suggest a donkey. You can use it in place of a tractor with a cart for hauling dirt, etc. and a plow instead of a roto-tiller.

#6 Mrs.Hippie3

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 07:19 PM

you need to plant corn in rows so they will pollinate each other. as far as your waste, start a compost pile and let it set for a year and till it into your garden. if you are going to plant all that i would highly recommend you invest in a tiller. will make your life alot easier and your back will thank you for it too. also dont forget to mulch, i use straw to mulch, it will keep the weeds down so you dont have to weed as often. BTW if you plant any melons make sure you plant them way away from your veggies cause they will take over your garden and choke out anything in their way.


#7 sporekid

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 07:22 PM

I will try biorganic (Chicken dung inoculated with azotobacter, azospirillum, bacillus specie, psudomonas).

#8 Bobcat

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 10:42 PM

many mushrooms grow well with food crops. Hypsizygus, Coprinus, Stropharia r-a, agaricus, several wood loving varieties (and wood chips from local tree trimmers will make a great mulch too). Just FYI. Make that land work!

#9 dfar

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 10:59 PM

Mrs. Hippie 3 is right that corn must be planted in rows or blocks rather. Like 8 feetx 8 feet blocks of all the same species (if you want the same corn next year). Corn is pollinated through the wind that why you need a block of some size to make sure everything gets pollinated.
Most corn only produces one to two cobs per stalk and since the block will be planted all at the same time you will end up with all the corn ripe at the same time, this should also be planned for.

If you planned on growing different varieties and wanted to keep them from cross pollinating than you will have to grow the blocks several feet apart (10 -20 I think?).

Corn is also a heavy feeder of nitrogen so to have good results you will most likely need to suppliment the soil with something. Most large operations (in which whole fields are grown) work on 4 year cycles of clover, legumes, fallow etc. (nitrogen fixing plants) for 3 years followed by a crop of corn the 4th year then repeat. same principle can be applied to garden in that garden crops are rotated yearly in a manner that has nitrogen fixing plants seeded in previously nitrogen feeding spaces the year previous.

the plants you listed are mostly all annuals and require the most work, since you have to seed and tend them year after year. If you know your going to be in the place for a while then perennials are very rewarding since they come back every year if maintained properly. You'll be looking at 2-3 years before you get asparagus that looks like that from the store.

There are lots of tricks you will pick up on your gardening journey and some nice reference material (that is organic) is looking into permaculture. Look into Bill Mollison he's the father of the movement and has some interesting books and there's tons on youtube.

good luck and keep us posted.

#10 egbert

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 11:00 PM

It would be a idea to have a few animals, to dispose of the waste greens, and to have manure for nutrients replacement, like a goat or pony.
Also my advice would be to start with a hand full of varieties and gradually increase them year by year.
Hope all goes to plan for you.

I heard a good idea is to have three gardens, and you plant on two and fertilize with animals (chickens, goats) on the last garden every year. And then you rotate, moving your chickens and goats to the next garden to fertilize for that year. Plus, you then have goat milk, cheese and eggs and bbq chicken. A certain variety of plants will put something and deplete something from your soil every year, so it is good to rotate the plants too. This is what a friend told me the other day.

#11 TastyBeverage

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 10:08 AM

If you plant a lot of very different varieties of squashes and cucumbers, plant them some distance apart or they will cross pollinate and you will get some funky looking veggies/fruits.

Also, certain crops have issues with certain types of soil born parasites/pests. I know that it's not recommended to plant potatoes in the same spot year after year because of this. I think i read that in another thread here, lol. Do your research. :)

#12 usagolden

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 11:19 AM

look into vermiculture
a worm farm is a great thing
http://mycotopia.net...cheap-easy.html
and like dfar said
look into permaculture and books by bill mollison


i have a pdf of mollison's permaculture handbook
if someone could pm me how to post it i'll do so

#13 Justintime

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 11:22 AM

Some people stagger thier corn planting so that they reach maturity at differing times, this way they have cobs constantly ready to eat. To harvest corn seed, leave cobs on the stalk until the outside leaves are totally dry and the kernels are full and hard. Never throw fertilizer granules over the top of your corn, they gather at the base of each leaf and burn the baby cobs to death. The stalk will grow root shoots a couple of inches above ground level, cover them with more compost, those are extra feeder roots, the stalk will grow stronger and reach more sustenance if you do this. The Hopi indians showed colonials how to grow corn by burying a fish beneath each seed. Minature blue Hopi indian corn is cute as a button and is a beautiful deep lapis blue but sweet corn is best for eating.

#14 narashima jaya

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 11:33 AM

it's a good idea to start a compost heap with all your left over organics and un bleached cardboard.. that way all your rotten or left over plant scraps can be used for fertilizer the next planting season i also invested in a dozen chickens.. they make great pets, great fertillizer and an egg a piece every day.. their dung is very high in fertilizer and can be added in small amounts to the compost heap or thrown directly in garden while you are tilling in the spring

#15 Mrs.Hippie3

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 11:47 AM

be careful when using chicken poo. it is very acidic. do not use fresh or by itself. it needs to compost at least a year 2 years to be on the safe side.

#16 narashima jaya

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 11:52 AM

be careful when using chicken poo. it is very acidic. do not use fresh or by itself. it needs to compost at least a year 2 years to be on the safe side.

thank you for that tidbit of info! i just starting raising my chicks last year and have been putting their dung in my compost heap.. i read you can put in garden when tilling and i heard you cant.. good point with the acidity never even thought of that :)

#17 dfar

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 01:42 PM

chicken feces is a mixture of feces and urine, since chicken don't have separate plumbing like mammals do. Chicken and other bird feces therefore contain relatively high levels of ammonia (from the urine) and are considered "hot" precisely because of this excessive amount of NH3. Chicken feces is effective at getting compost piles "burning" since when the feces starts to break down it produces lots of heat that supports microbial growth and the breakdown of cellulose. Just watch you keep a proper ratio of nitrogen to cellulose in your compost pile roughly 1:30. If there is to much nitrogen in the pile your pile will have a distinct ammonia smell which means to just add more cellulose/plant matter.

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Composting

#18 narashima jaya

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 02:25 PM

chicken feces is a mixture of feces and urine, since chicken don't have separate plumbing like mammals do. Chicken and other bird feces therefore contain relatively high levels of ammonia (from the urine) and are considered "hot" precisely because of this excessive amount of NH3. Chicken feces is effective at getting compost piles "burning" since when the feces starts to break down it produces lots of heat that supports microbial growth and the breakdown of cellulose. Just watch you keep a proper ratio of nitrogen to cellulose in your compost pile roughly 1:30. If there is to much nitrogen in the pile your pile will have a distinct ammonia smell which means to just add more cellulose/plant matter.

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Composting

when i clean out my coop the waste is usually mixed with straw.. the ratios seem to be about right for now.. thanx for the link and info

#19 copelandiaKidd

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 07:31 PM

Now, as cultivation is easy enough, my main discussion focus is breading.



are we going to be frying them?? jk:rasta:

#20 Stoned Angel

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 06:11 PM

Your living my dream :thumbup: You've got great answers in here as well.




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