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Buckminster Fuller


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#1 prism

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 11:28 AM

I have been reading and studying this man's work and I am extremely impressed... I will be using this thread to share what I have learned so far...

This is his "Dymaxation map"

According to Wiki;

"The Dymaxion map or Fuller map is a projection of a world map onto the surface of a polyhedron, which can then be unfolded to a net in many different ways and flattened to form a two-dimensional map which retains most of the relative proportional integrity of the globe map.
It was created by Buckminster Fuller, and patented by him during 1946, the patent application showing a projection onto a cuboctahedron.[1] The 1954 version published by Fuller with the title The AirOcean World Map used a slightly modified but mostly regular icosahedron as the base for the projection, and this is the version most commonly referred to today. The name Dymaxion was applied by Fuller to several of his inventions.
The Dymaxion projection is intended only for representations of the entire globe. It is not a gnomonic projection, whereby global data expands from the center point of a tangent facet outward to the edges. Instead, each triangle edge of the Dymaxion map matches the scale of a partial great circle on a corresponding globe, and other points within each facet shrink toward its middle, rather than enlarging to the peripheries."

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#2 TVCasualty

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 11:38 AM

I'm a big fan of Fuller's work, and love his metaphor for how to affect change in the world:


In the February 1972 issue of Playboy, Fuller said:

Something hit me very hard once, thinking about what one little man could do. Think of the Queen Mary—the whole ship goes by and then comes the rudder. And there's a tiny thing at the edge of the rudder called a trim tab. It's a miniature rudder. Just moving the little trim tab builds a low pressure that pulls the rudder around. Takes almost no effort at all. So I said that the little individual can be a trim tab. Society thinks it's going right by you, that it's left you altogether. But if you're doing dynamic things mentally, the fact is that you can just put your foot out like that and the whole big ship of state is going to go. So I said, call me Trim Tab.

—Buckminster Fuller



#3 prism

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 11:41 AM

^^^ Thats what Im talkin about!! I think thats on his gravestone!! :lol:

#4 Beast

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 02:40 PM

Buckminster Fuller was da man! :headbang:

I bet most of his genius came from having such a cool name.

Can you imagine what Burning Man would be like if Buckminster Fuller had never existed?? :amazed:
buckminsterfuller_00.jpg

#5 prism

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 08:08 PM

yeah I think the geodesic dome has a bright future.:meditate:

#6 SilvrHairDevil

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 08:47 PM

And, the mini-geodesic domes, AKA Buckminsterfullerene, BuckyBalls are going to be at the forefront as nano-technology picks up.

http://www.scienceda...80918171148.htm

“Buckyballs may see widespread use in future products and applications, from drug-delivery vehicles for cancer therapy to ultrahard coatings and military armor, chemical sensors and hydrogen-storage technologies for batteries and automotive fuel cells.”


http://www.3rd1000.com/bucky/bucky.htm

“It is the roundest and most symmetrical large molecule known to man. Buckministerfullerine continues to astonish with one amazing property after another. Named after American architect R. Buckminister Fuller who designed a geodesic dome with the same fundamental symmetry, C60 is the third major form of pure carbon; graphite and diamond are the other two.”


http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1297043264

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#7 prism

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 06:31 AM



d0_DKeFfObI

#8 TVCasualty

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 11:34 AM

Something else Fuller inspired was this award for furthering the type of vision he had for tackling the major problems plaguing humanity and the planet. I think we'll see something related to fungi win it someday (hopefully soon).

I'd like to enter it myself and I think anyone with sufficient mycology or plant tissue culturing skills has a shot provided the intended application is designed with a clear focus and realistic plan. Mycoremediation, critical widespread nutrient deficiencies (esp. vitamin D), forest restoration, innovative building materials, mycopesticides (gotta dance carefully around the patents), and plenty of other innovative possibilities can all be developed from the skills acquired by learning how to grow mushrooms at home, and I suspect that people who have such skills often don't fully appreciate just how powerful their full potential really is.

"Socially-Responsible Design's Highest Award"



The Buckminster Fuller Challenge is an annual international design Challenge awarding $100,000 to support the development and implementation of a strategy that has significant potential to solve humanity's most pressing problems. It attracts bold, visionary, tangible initiatives focused on a well-defined need of critical importance. Winning solutions are regionally specific yet globally applicable and present a truly comprehensive, anticipatory, integrated approach to solving the world's complex problems.


Inspired by Buckminster Fuller

Buckminster Fuller's prolific life of exploration, discovery, invention and teaching was driven by his intention “to make the world work for 100% of humanity, in the shortest possible time, through spontaneous cooperation without ecological offense or disadvantage of anyone.”

Fuller coupled this intention with a pioneering approach aimed at solving complex problems. This approach, which he called “comprehensive anticipatory design science”, combined an emphasis on individual initiative and integrity with whole systems thinking, scientific rigor and faithful reliance on nature's underlying principles. The designs he is best known for (the geodesic dome, the Dymaxion house, car, and map, and the global electric grid) were part of a visionary strategy to redesign the inter-related systems of shelter, transportation and energy.

After decades of tracking world resources, innovations in science and technology, and human needs, Fuller asserted that options exist to successfully surmount the crises of unprecedented scope and complexity facing all humanity – he issued an urgent call for a design science revolution to make the world work for all.

Answering this call is what the Buckminster Fuller Challenge is all about.


http://challenge.bfi.org/

#9 Beast

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 04:31 PM

Buckminster Fuller was a fan of Polyphasic Sleep. From the Wikipedia article on Polyphasic sleep:

In an early mention of systematic napping as a lifestyle, in order to gain more time awake in the day, Buckminster Fuller reportedly advocated a regimen consisting of 30-minute naps every six hours. The short article about Fuller's nap schedule in Time in 1943 also refers to such a schedule as "intermittent sleeping," says that he maintained it for two years, and further notes:

Eventually he had to quit because his schedule conflicted with that of his business associates, who insisted on sleeping like other men.

However, it is not clear when Fuller practiced any such sleep pattern, and whether it was really as strictly periodic as claimed in that article; it has also been said that he ended this experiment because of his wife's objections. Moreover, Fuller is the only figure on record who claimed a successful Dymaxion sleep. Thus, there is no certitude about the sustainability of this schedule.


I'm really interested in polyphasic sleep, and have experimented with it in the past. As Buckminster Fuller observed, it is difficult to maintain such a schedule over long periods.

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A "normal" sleep pattern is called "monophasic sleep" meaning a single sleep period per 24 hr day/night cycle usually lasting about 8 hours.

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"Biphasic" and "Everyman" sleep schedules divide the sleep period into 1-3 naps of about 20 minutes but also include a larger sleep of 3-4 hours.

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The real gusto is when you get into the "Dymaxion" and "Uberman" sleep schedules. Dymaxion is four 30 minute naps per 24 hour period. Uberman is six 20 minute naps per 24 hr period.

Interestingly, there is a form of Yoga called Yoga Nidra that is similar only the line between awake and asleep is blurred entirely as the concept is to remain awake while in a state of deep sleep. If you think that sounds confusing, you're not alone ;)

The idea with modern theories of polyphasic sleep coincide with sleep research that shows 4 levels of depth to sleep with REM sleep being the deepest 5th level, and also the level of sleep that is actually beneficial, where your body and consciousness is finally able to take a break and recooperate. With a polyphasic sleep schedule (key word being schedule), is that you sort of train your brain to expect short sleep periods at these regular intervals of awakeness, thus able to drop immediately into REM sleep rather than spending the first 4 -5 hours of your monophasic period slowly dropping down to an REM state. If properly done, you can actually get more REM sleep with a polyphasic schedule, while also getting more hours awake.

There are critics of course. If a fairly strict napping schedule isn't adhered to, sleep deprivation will result, and more sleep than just a 20 minute nap will be necessary to get back on track. I think the everyman schedule would be a bit easier to maintain over a long period than something like the uberman.

I think that if you like dreaming, and are interested in lucid dreaming, then you will find polyphasic sleep to be beneficial to those goals.

I also think that maintaining a healthy diet and lifestyle would make this alot easier too. Or rather, experimenting with polyphasic sleep might be just the impetus necessary to get me to moderate my alcohol and marijuana consumption. :neutral:

Even Buckminster Fuller himself had trouble maintaining the schedule over long periods. I think it would be more appropriate to organize it according to your needs professionally and socially.

The ideal here, with the uberman, would basically result in 22hours of awake time per 24 hour period, only 2 hours sleeping spread through out the day, every 5 and a half hours you take a 20 minute nap. Sounds like you'd just come unzipped, so maybe if you are interested in actually applying this on your own, use google and wikipedia to read up on the concept. There's a polyphasic sleeper forum out there, getting social support is handy for such a huge behavioral change. You'll find that polyphasers have similar experiences and can provide good advice to making the transition.

I was thinking once I actually get around to trying a polyphasic schedule, that I'd start up a thread and maybe social group if there was enough interest. One of these days... :smokin:
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#10 prism

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 06:34 PM

I am not suprized so many solid topiates are a fan of Bucky... Makes perfect sense!:heartbeat

#11 wildburr

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 08:55 PM

I love Bucky, he was a true genious. His Dymaxion house Is on permanent display at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn Michigan, Fairly close to my place. Very cool design for its time

#12 tucool

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 12:34 AM

Brilliant thinker, lousy implementor. Bucky's fatal flaw was that he wasn't really interested in making things happen - he could've made a huge splash post war with his dymaxion aluminum house. never made it happen. other prob - wouldn't change his mind despite all evidence. for instance, his dymaxion car had a nasty tendency to go airborne because of the aerodynamics of the underbody. people pointed it out to him, he ignored it.
Such wasted potential. Pretty much everything he said made huge sense. Imagine what would've happened if he'd followed through.




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