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black powder anyone?


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#1 MurCurY

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 12:41 PM

So, this year I decided to pick up a "primitive firearms" hunting license. It enables me to hunt with a muzzle loader. So....in doing some research into black powder arms....I found out there are a few different kinds...most of which are illegal to hunt with during primitive arms season. For it to be legal, it has to be "true inline" which eliminates most of the newer guns....I called local shop and they only have one that is "legal" and in stock....the Thomson Center "Omega Z5". I found it in the Cabela's catalog for $350 with a "starter kit".

So...does anyone have any experience with black powder and can give me some insight or pointers into purchasing a gun? What about this specific gun?

http://www.cabelas.c...ch-All Products

this is the one i'm looking at with a different pattern on the stock.

#2 SpiritMolecule

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 01:06 PM

Sorry. My only experience with that stuff does NOT involve loading it into a rifle of any kind..lol

#3 director of sound

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 02:34 PM

thats a nice one, T/C makes real nice guns that will last if you treat them right. pyrodex pellets will treat you good and are alot easier to loas than strait powder, most rifles will take up to 3 of them so you can taylor a shot to your needs. the barnes spitfire sabots are super accurate and will take down any deer. toss a regular 3-9x40 scope and your set. make sure you clean the hell out of it after every shooting session. black powder is corrosive as hell and will ruin the gun if left to sit. i know from experience when i left a old 1851 navy-colt .36cal (repo) sit for a few days before i cleaned it. froze the chamber up, rusted the hammer to the frame and put some decent pitting in the barrel. after ripping the whole thing to pieces to clean it and slapping it together i still will only shoot blanks through it now.

#4 MurCurY

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 02:53 PM

yeah those dex pellets are awesome. black powder has come a long way since good 'ol flintlocks. Glad someone had some input. This is totally new to me. But I figured since the season exists....I should shoot something :reb:

#5 Oblivion

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 06:28 PM

I avoid composite fire arms if I can, that's just a personal preference though, I've never noticed a performance difference between the two. I've got a flintlock pistol (1700's replica) and a Pennsylvania Long Rifle replica, less the flintlock, it uses caps. I don't remember the manufacture though. The flintlock will at times take a second or so to fire after you've pulled the trigger if you haven't kept it clean. After you've pulled the trigger and jerked the gun, you realize it hasn't actually fired yet. 'Steady dipshit' :lol: I've said that to myself a couple times because of that. Anyway it teaches me to keep steady while I squeeze the trigger of other guns. Plus to keep the fucking gun clean in the first place. I'm not sure if you were gonna order that over the internet, not sure if you even can still mail order black powder, but I would look the gun over in person if you can. Things like plastic triggers and trigger guards are good indicators that they've chosen poor engineering and higher profits over high quality and appreciation of the firearm by the consumers. Trigger guards are intended to protect the trigger from accidental actuation. I would think a plastic one would have raised a red flag to someone along the way. The engineers and gunsmiths that make them should all be lined up and slapped in the mouth if you ask me.
You have to keep them real clean and clean them often. They have a sever problem with rust. If I ever get another one, I'm gonna look into stainless steel rifles. There might be a way to preserve them better though. Seems like every rust preventive I try doesn't work other than regular cleanings. I'm sure thats why my neighbors never talked to me back when I lived in town where they can look out their window and watch your tv.
Even with their high maintenance I'd say they're worth it. They're both fun to shoot and it gives me a glimpse into the lives of folks that were here before us.

#6 iamsmiley

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 12:23 AM

i was considering buying a black powder rifle until i started adding up the costs for dex pellets and sabbots! where i live we don't get any extra deer tags to hunt with primitive weapons so i just stick to a normal rifle.atleast if i miss or make a bad shot i might get to try again!

#7 microscopeman

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 12:53 AM

oh no.. Mycotopia is now on the terror watch list.. Thanks for the thread though. ;)

#8 MurCurY

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 08:20 AM

shooting in general is expensive. in my state there is a long list of infractions that disqualifies you to have a FID. If you meet one of these disqualifiers, it's for LIFE. The exception is primitive firearms. You do not need an FID to own/use/hunt with black powder. Not that this is the case for me....but...with the black powder there is an extra season you can get a deer. Also, in my state...it's legal to hunt any deer season with bow. So, I picked up a bow and am going to use that around the property i live on...silent but deadly :horse:

#9 pinehunter

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 09:54 AM

Black powder was fun. A friend and I used to go shooting every week. The advantage of black powder is more shooting; cartridges are expensive, where black powder "possibles" are relatively cheaper per load. I had a small collection of handguns and rifles. One does not have to go "primitive". Ruger makes and "Old Army" .44 built on the same frame as the Super Blackhawk .44 Mag. It's a fine black powder handgun with a lot of authority.

You can buy kits and do all your own finish work. I had a nice replica .58 Hawkin. Buffalo rifle. The friend of mine was a gunsmith. He had a Sharps 50/140 drop breach (like Quigly Down Under). Elephant rifle. There's no getting around the recoil from this gun!

We did a lot of shooting. Now I don't own any guns. Don't feel the need.

#10 dead_diver

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 12:26 PM

So, this year I decided to pick up a "primitive firearms" hunting license. It enables me to hunt with a muzzle loader. So....in doing some research into black powder arms....I found out there are a few different kinds...most of which are illegal to hunt with during primitive arms season. For it to be legal, it has to be "true inline" which eliminates most of the newer guns....I called local shop and they only have one that is "legal" and in stock....the Thomson Center "Omega Z5". I found it in the Cabela's catalog for $350 with a "starter kit".

So...does anyone have any experience with black powder and can give me some insight or pointers into purchasing a gun? What about this specific gun?

http://www.cabelas.c...ch-All Products

this is the one i'm looking at with a different pattern on the stock.

The Thompson Center Encore is modular. It can be converted from rifle to pistol and the barrels can be swapped from muzzle loader to centerfire cartrige and shotgun too. They have interchangable barrels available in almost every calibre known to man. One of these days I'm going to have to get one. http://www.tcarms.co...arms/encore.php




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