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Mycotopia's Laboratory Safety Collaboration


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#1 Phineas_Carmichael

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 10:45 PM

A word about lab safety, conveniently located in a sticky, seems to me to be prudent... I would like this sticky to remain a sort of "quick-reference" for people wanting to set up a safe clandestine chemistry lab.

Please limit your comments in this thread to pertinent safety tips only. In order to keep it lean and sleek and the information readily available, I'll be frequently deleting off-topic posts or merging good posts into other good posts (with credit to the original authors).

In this first post we will talk about the general spacial requirements for a safe lab.

Your lab should have hard floors (not carpet) and preferably a floor drain. If this means your bathtub is the only appropriate place in your domicile, your bathtub now doubles as a lab. If there is a floor-spill and your lab is carpeted, you are thoroughly screwed (good luck getting your security deposit back :spank:). Likewise, any surface you work on should be able to stand up to a spill. Simply laying a trash bag (many are HDPE or PET, but please check the brand you have) on top of a table makes it "lab-safe" in most cases.

Your lab should have adequate ventilation, especially if you will be working with volatile compounds. When a liquid catches fire, it is not the liquid that burns, but the vapors coming off it. Keep these vapors to a minimum by ventilating your lab; if it were a "real" chemistry lab there would be a hood for you to work in. Building a hood would be best, but opening all the windows and running several sparkless fans is second-best.

A quick word about your clothing in the lab. This will be repeated later, but it's important so here you go. Long sleeves, long pants, close-toed shoes. Tie back your hair. Braid your beard. For 5 bucks you can buy a lab-coat too. Lab-coats don't just look cool, they actually provide a fair amount of protection from spills. Plus, they let you do things like this:
214738d1301202006-mycotopias-laboratory-

Click here for A Peek Into a Clandestine Chemistry Lab

Attached Thumbnails

  • Lab Coats.png

Edited by Sidestreet, 11 February 2017 - 07:57 AM.
fixed link

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#2 Phineas_Carmichael

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 10:55 PM

What follows is a list of the necessary safety equipment in your properly ventilated, properly floored lab. Also included are spill-control procedures and chemical disposal protocols. All equipment mentioned or pictured in the "Fire Control" and "Spill Control" sections should also be considered necessary.

Equipment:

Gloves:
Gloves.jpg
Your gloves should be rated to stand up to high pH, low pH, and several different hydrocarbon solvents.

Goggles:
Goggles.jpg
Your goggles must be splash resistant goggles. If they do not create a tight seal around your eyes, they are not rated for use with liquid chemicals. Simple eyeglass-type safety goggles are not suitable for the chemistry lab. If they don't leave a mark around your eyes that makes you look like a dweeb they are not good enough!

You MUST wear gloves and goggles at the very least! Shit, I wear splash-resistant goggles for making coffee in a French Press. Yeah, it makes me look like a dork, but there are 2 coffee-related incidents I can think of in the past 5 years where my dork-goggles saved me from serious eyeball burn. If I can almost blind myself making coffee, it can happen to anyone, especially if they're doing something more dangerous than making coffee.

Eyewash Bottles:
eyewash.jpg
In the event that something gets around your goggles (It happens, even to the best Chemists) it would be good to keep an eyewash bottle around. Real eyewash bottles as pictured above come to you filled with sterile saline solution and need to be replaced each time they are used. Some clandestine extractors keep an eye wash bottle filled with a weak baking soda solution, to neutralize acid spills and another with a weak boric acid solution to neutralize alkaline spills.

Apron:
Apron.jpg
A rubber apron might not be a bad idea either; it isn't totally necessary, but would provide a lot of peace of mind.

Respirator:
For further peace of mind, a respirator rated to remove hydrocarbon vapor from the airstream is an excellent thing to have.
organic-vapor-respirator-G80002.jpg
Expect to pay big $$$ for a laboratory quality respirator, but a painter's respirator from a hardware store should be enough protection for most home chemists, unless they're using more exotic solvents. If you plan to do any sort of "gassing" to salt alkaloids, spend the money on a good respirator and save your lungs.

MSDS Documents:
Material Safety Data Sheets provide a wealth of information about chemicals including pertinent chemical data, (chemical composition of the product, boiling point, flash point, etc) first-aid data, and spill-cleanup data. Most of them are available online by googling the product name + "msds." Legitimate businesses are required to have a "readily accessible" binder which contains the MSDS data sheets for all hazardous chemicals stored or used on the premises. I recommend that you do the same for all chemicals stored in your lab. It would suck to have a huge spill and need to spend 10 minutes googling what to do instead of just pulling down your MSDS binder and knowing what to do in 30 seconds flat!

Gather up MSDS documents for everything in your lab and READ THEM!
They don't do you any good if you don't READ THEM!

Fire Control:

Fire extinguisher:
Posted Image
DERP! This almost goes without saying, but make sure you know how to use your fire extinguisher before you ever begin a work-up. I recommend buying two, and "wasting" one of them by familiarizing yourself with the firing procedure. The general firing procedure for fire extinguishers is as follows:
  • Position oneself 6-8 feet from the source of flame (If you can't get this close it is a matter for professionals!)
  • Pull pin (In the heat of the moment, many people forget this!)
  • Aim at base of flame
  • Pull trigger, sweeping back and forth across the base of the flame.

Fire bucket:
FB2(1).jpg
A fire extinguisher is great for most disasters, but there may be a time when a quantity of flammable liquid ignites. If one were to blast a pressurized fire extinguisher at this burning puddle it could blow the flaming liquid all over the lab, turning a lab accident into a catastrophe. For fire control in this situation, a "fire bucket" is probably a better choice.

This bucket is full of sand that, when dumped on a flame, removes the oxygen from the fire triangle
Posted Image

Spill Control:

Spills. They happen. In an infinite universe anything is possible so the chemist needs to be ready for anything. There are several different kinds of spills, but all are cleaned up using the same basic protocol.

1. Non-flammable floor spills

These can be mopped up with a clean mop or cloth while wearing proper safety gear, as described above. Once the liquid has been contained in an HDPE bucket it can be neutralized to pH 7 and poured down a drain. This is only for aqueous solutions such as NaOH, HCl, vinegar, etc.

2. Non-flammable flesh spills

These are the scary ones. Small spills on flesh should be neutralized by running them under a baking soda solution. This works for acids and bases (please don't argue, NaHCO3 is amphoteric, so we use it for both acidic and alkaline spills) and is standard procedure in the Lab. If you spill NaOH on yourself and neutralize it with vinegar you're going to be in a world of hurt. Neutralize with sodium bicarb and you'll still be in a world of hurt, but it will end much sooner.

For large spills on flesh or clothing, get your ass into the shower. Right like you are, fully dressed, and get completely wet. An emergency shower in a real lab will dump 10-20 gallons on you in the space of 2 minutes. Once your clothing is completely soaked (and the spilled liquid diluted considerably) you can carefully remove it but don't take off your goggles until its gone. Transfer your ruined clothing to a plastic garbage bag and dispose of it properly. Since you're already in the shower and probably shat yourself after a spill that big, go ahead and clean up completely before going back to the lab.

3. Flammable Floor Spills which do not Ignite

You're one lucky SOB. Be even more careful next time, but for now spread an absorbent on the spill. If 1 gallon or more of flammable solvent spills, the fire department and possibly the EPA (depending on location) should be called for ultimate safety.
24a.jpeg
You can buy "Solvent Spill" kits, some of them are zeolite, some are montmorillonite, some are activated carbon. The safest thing to do is buy a legitimate spill kit, but good old-fashioned kitty litter is good enough for small spills.
Litter.jpeg
It absorbs all the liquid, locking it away where it cannot burn. When the patch of absorbent is completely dry, sweep it up into a plastic bag, and dispose of in the regular trash. Sounds bad, right? It's not. This is what the fire department does when someone spills a bunch of gasoline at a petrol station. They zoom up in their big truck, throw absorbent all over the place from 25 gallon drums, and zoom away saying, "When that's dry just sweep it up and throw it away."

Do not, under any circumstances attempt to wash used absorbent down any drain. It should be safe in the standard trash, but taking a bag of it to a HazMat center certainly wouldn't raise any flags and would be ecologically responsible.

3. Flammable flesh spills which do not ignite

Rinse the affected area with water. Feel bad about the minuscule amount of solvent that goes down the drain. Follow previous absorbent protocol for any liquid that dripped off your flesh and onto the bench or floor.

4. Flammable spills (floor or flesh) which do ignite

These aren't spills anymore. Once a spill ignites it ceases to be a spill and becomes a FIRE. G-d forbid anybody ever has a fire in their lab, but being prepared could keep it from getting out of hand. Remember, if you can't get within 6-8 feet of the flames it is too big for you to deal with. Start heading for the Border, because the Fire Marshall is not going to be happy with you.

Chemical Disposal

Most of the main chemicals used by clandestine chemists can be neutralized to pH 7, diluted, and poured down a standard drain. NaOH is sold as drain cleaner anyway, right? The General Rule: If it's aqueous and not a hydrocarbon, neutralize to pH 7, dilute and pour down a drain.

It's the solvents that require attention to detail. Evaporating them or pouring them down a drain is horribly ecologically irresponsible. Most of the extraction protocols we use now allow us to reuse solvent (through freeze-precip or salting out alkaloids) and that's a good thing; good for the environment, good for the wallet.

When a solvent becomes too "used" to remain useful, there are a couple options. The first would be to distill the solvent off the impurities. I cannot recommend this because it's dangerous as hell, even with proper equipment. The best option in my opinion is to put the solvent in its original can, add a dob or two of paint (whichever type of paint is "supposed to be" thinned by the particular solvent) and take it to your local hazardous waste disposal center. They'll do some paperwork, take your can of liquid environmental death, and you can go whistling on your merry way, knowing that you just did a good thing for the planet.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 10125.jpg
  • Fire_Triangle.png
  • extinguisher.gif

Edited by Phineas_Carmichael, 27 March 2011 - 09:38 PM.
Images

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#3 Phineas_Carmichael

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 11:00 PM

Here are 15 rules for the Organic Chemistry Lab. Read them, memorize them, they will certainly save your product, and they could possibly save your life. These rules are not my work, they are from The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual by James Zubrick. Recommended reading for anyone who wants to do an extraction in their garage...

The organic chemistry laboratory is potentially one of the most dangerous of undergraduate laboratories. That is why you must have a set of safety guidelines. It is a very good idea to pay close attention to these rules for one very good reason:

The penalties are only too real.



Disobeying safety rules is not at all like flouting many other rules. You can get seriously hurt. No appeal. No bargaining for another 12 points so you can get into medical school. Perhaps as a patient, but certainly not as a student. So, go ahead. Ignore these guidelines. But remember--

You have been warned!



1. Wear your goggles. Eye injuries are extremely serious and can be mitigated and eliminated if you keep your goggles on at all times. And I mean over your eyes, not on top of your head or around your neck. There are several types of eye protection available, some of it acceptable, some not, according to local, state, and federal laws. I like the clear plastic goggles that leave an unbroken red line on your face when you remove them. Sure, they fog up a bit, but the protection is superb. Also, think about getting chemicals or chemical fumes trapped under your contact lenses before you wear them to lab. Then don't wear them to lab. Ever.

2. Touch not thyself. Not a Biblical injunction, but a bit of advice. You may have gotten chemicals on your hands, in a concentration that is not noticeable, and sure enough, up go the goggles for an eye wipe with the fingers. Enough said.

3. There is no "away." Getting rid of chemicals is a very big problem. You throw them from here, and they wind up poisoning someone else. Now there are some laws to stop that from happening. The rules were really designed for industrial waste, where there are hundreds of gallons of waste that have the same composition. In a semester of organic lab there will be much smaller amounts of different materials. Waste containers could be provided for everything, but this is not practical. If you don't see the waste can you need, ask your instructor. When in doubt, ask.

4. Bring a friend. You must never work alone. If you have a serious accident and you are all by yourself, you might not be able to get help before you die. Don't work alone, and don't work at unauthorized times.

5. Don't fool around. Chemistry is serious business. Don't be careless or clown around in lab. You can hurt yourself or other people. You don't have to be somber about it; just serious.

6. Drive defensively. Work in the lab as if someone else were going to have an accident that might affect you. Keep the goggles on because someone else is going to point a loaded, boiling test tube at you. Someone else is going to spill hot, concentrated acid on your body. Get the idea? {Note from Phin: This still applies even if you are violating rule 4 and working alone.}

7. Eating, drinking, or smoking in a lab. Are you kidding? Eat in a chem lab? Drink in a chem lab??? Smoke, and blow yourself up????

8. Keep it clean. Work neatly. You don't have to make a fetish out of it, but try to be neat. Clean up spills. Turn off burners or water or electrical equipment when you're through with them.

9. Where it's at. Learn the location and proper use of the fire extinguishers, fire blankets, safety showers, and eyewash stations.

10. Making the best-dressed list. Keep yourself covered from the neck to the toes--no matter what the weather. That might include long-sleeved tops that also cover the midsection. Is that too uncomfortable for you? How about a chemical burn to accompany your belly button or an oddly shaped scar on your arm in lieu of a tattoo. And pants that come down to the shoes, covering any exposed ankles is probably a good idea as well. No loose-fitting cuffs on the pants or the shirts. Nor are dresses appropriate for lab, guys. Keep the midsection covered. Tie back that long hair. And a small investment in a lab coat can pay off, projecting that extra professional touch. It gives a lot of protection too. Consider wearing disposable gloves. Clear polyethylene ones are inexpensive, but the smooth plastic is slippery, and there's a tendency for the seams to rip open when you least expect it. Latex examination gloves keep the grip and don't have seams, but they cost more. Gloves are not perfect protectors. Reagents like bromine can get through and cause severe burns. They'll buy you some time though and can help mitigate or prevent severe burns. Oh, yes--laboratory aprons: they only cover the front, so your exposed legs are still at risk from behind.

11 Hot under the collar. Many times you'll be asked or told to heat something. Don't just automatically go for the Bunsen burner. That way lies fire. Usually-

No Flames!



Try a hot plate, try a heating mantle, but try to stay away from flames. Most of the fires I've had to put out started when some bozo decided to heat some flammable solvent in an open beaker. Sure, there are times when you'll have to use a flame, but use it away from all flammables and in a hood, and only with the permission of your instructor.

12. Work in the hood. A hood is a specially constructed workplace that has, at the least, a powered vent to suck noxious fumes outside. There's also a safety glass or plastic panel you slide down as protection from exploding apparatus. If it is at all possible, treat every chemical (even solids) as if toxic or bad-smelling fumes came from it, and carry out as many of the operations in the organic lab as you can inside a hood, unless told otherwise.

13. Keep your fingers to yourself. Ever practiced "finger chemistry"? You're unprepared so you have a lab book out, and your finger points to the start of a sentence. You move your finger to the end of the first line and do that operation--

"Add this solution to the beaker containing the ice-water mixture"


And WHOOSH! Clouds of smoke. What happened? The next line reads--

"very carefully as the reaction is highly exothermic"


But you didn't read that line, or the next, or the next. So you are a danger to yourself and everyone else. Read and take notes on any experiment before you come to lab.

14. What you don't know can hurt you. If you are not sure about an operation, or you have any question about handling anything, please ask your instructor before you go on. Get rid of the notion that asking questions will make you look foolish. Following this safety rule may be the most difficult one of all. Grow up. Be responsible for yourself and your own education.

15. Blue Cross or Blue Shield? Find out how you would get medical help, if you needed it. Sometimes during a summer session, the school infirmary is closed and you would have to be transported to the nearest hospital.


Edited by Phineas_Carmichael, 27 March 2011 - 09:18 PM.
Caveman Stylings

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#4 Phineas_Carmichael

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 11:01 PM

Here is a list of horrible accidents that have occurred here at Topia over the years that I thought you should all know about before trying any of this dangerous stuff in your bathroom.
 

https://mycotopia.ne...kaboom-warning/

https://mycotopia.ne...lvent-in-a-sep/


If you have a lab accident, make a new thread about it and post the link here in this thread. I'll add it to the list.


Edited by Sidestreet, 11 February 2017 - 08:01 AM.
fixed links


#5 Phineas_Carmichael

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 08:51 PM

In this post we'll list some everyday laboratory practices that are often skipped over as "common knowledge" in many TEKs. If you have a general laboratory practice to share, post it in this thread and I will add it to this list.

Miscellaneous Procedures:
A Note About Materials:
Borosilicate Glass is the laboratory standard. It is resistant to high and low temperatures, most acids and bases, and is much more difficult to shatter than normal glass. "Pyrex" is a brand-name for borosilicate glass. For absolute safety, make certain everything in your lab is made from borosilicate. HDPE plastic can be used for many things, but boro provides ultimate peace of mind.

If you want to risk it and use an unfamiliar plastic in an extraction, test small samples of it with a strong acid, a strong base, and a hydrocarbon solvent. If the plastic melts, discolors, or "gets wonky" in any way, it is not suitable for extraction.

Safely Creating Aqueous Solutions:
When creating acidic or basic solutions, always add the acid(or base) to the water and never the other way around. If the TEK you are reading says "combine 40g NaOH with 1L H20" it means "add 40g NaOH to 1L H2O." If you do it the other way and add water to dry NaOH, the water will boil instantly and come shooting up out of the container all over everywhere.

Thanks to [user]SilvrHairDevil[/user] for this little rhyme:

Do what you oughter,
Add acid to water.

Calibrating a pH Meter:
Calibration of digital pH meters should be performed before any lab procedure. Calibration solutions (buffer solutions of known pH, usually pH 4 and pH 10) should be purchased with the meter to make sure it is reading correctly.

Decent digital pH meters will have 2 "calibration screws" somewhere on them which are labeled "pH 4/7" and "pH 10" or something similar. To calibrate your meter, submerge the electrode in a buffer solution that matches the "low calibration adjustment" label (pH 4 in this example) and turn the appropriate screw until the display matches the pH of the solution. Then rinse the electrode in distilled water and submerge it in a buffer solution of pH that matches the "high calibration adjustment" label and turn the appropriate screw until the display matches the pH of the 2nd buffer. Rinse the electrode in distilled water and check one of your buffers again. The meter should read what the bottle declares is the pH. If it doesn't, recalibrate until you can bounce from one buffer to the other and get an accurate reading for both. Congratulations, your pH meter is now calibrated.

Edited by Phineas_Carmichael, 27 March 2011 - 09:29 PM.

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#6 Phineas_Carmichael

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 11:01 PM

Here is a list of horrible accidents that have occurred here at Topia over the years that I thought you should all know about before trying any of this dangerous stuff in your bathroom.



https://mycotopia.ne...kaboom-warning/-- OMGWTFBBQ! I hope the OP in this thread is still alive.

https://mycotopia.ne...lvent-in-a-sep/-- A great discussion, and part of the inspiration for this Sticky.

https://mycotopia.ne...all-extractors/-- The reason that we neutralize acidic and alkaline spills with Baking Soda.

http://mycotopia.net...-my-vision.html -- Here's one that makes me shudder... Post 16 is a great reinforcement of Zubrick's rule 7, NO BEVERAGES in the lab!

https://mycotopia.ne...essy-chemistry/-- A reason to end your experiments as soon as possible and not keep things around just for frugality's sake.


If you have a lab accident, make a new thread about it and post the link here in this thread. I'll add it to the list.


Edited by Sidestreet, 11 February 2017 - 08:08 AM.
Fixed the links I could find, one still missing


#7 Defiance

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 10:18 PM

It never hurts to make friends with a nurse or an EMT. Doctors too, but they're usually busy. Anne_Halonium pointed out that if you show up in an ER with caustic burns all over your face and no good cover story, you might just get reported.

Great thread Phin, thanks a bunch for putting in the effort :bow:

#8 anne halonium

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 09:16 AM

in addition to "first responders" , neighbors should never be underestimated.
garbage dudes are trained now to spot lab waste........
cable guys and meter readers are wise to stuff also.......

lab waste can haunt you in other ways........

the "DAWN" network is wise to patterns of O.D. and hospital admissions....
a burst of peeps in the psyche ward that think its mousey-land will not go unnoticed...........a "burst" meaning "more than 2 in 3 months"........

read material safety data sheets..........
know your physics...........

know your glass, know how to handle it correctly, know your plastics.

use "spotters"..........work during rain or high winds........

use tyvek suits, polycarb face shields can be had from most hardwares...

know your fire extinguishers, and know the secondary damage they do when used...........and get 2........solvent fires can be persistant.....

never store solvents anywhere near the work area.........
know how to store properly.......some solvents degrade and can become super dangerous..........

avoid stockpiling anything......

know your respirators, and the types.

know your gloves and types..........

if you work at night, consider red lights........

"camp " showers, can be topped off with vinegar by the gallon for decontamination showers.........
cold baths can be pre- filled with neutralizers added........

realize liquid fire can travel into cracks under cabinets and walls........
smoke builds fast in a lab fire......you have no choice to ventilate, or run, even if you stop the fire, the smoke may be seen for blocks.........
be prepared!

gas pilot lights on heaters and stoves .........you will only forget to check that one time........

dont work all the time.........do a gig, stop , clean up totally.....
a constant set up is a disaster in the wait............
:greenboun
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#9 anne halonium

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 08:38 PM

consider electric safety peeps...........

some things to think about, for ANY set up.......

know your watts, know your breakers, know the over-all quality of your wiring.
common electric lab equipment can blow breakers.........
know if your on "someone-elses" circuts.

use modern heavy duty cords and junction boxes....
use nylon zip ties to secure all wires.........
use a "master power" junction box.......never forget the kill switch.

dont use what we call "death bulbs" AKA normal incandescent.
one flying drop of solvent shatters the bulb ,and as a bonus exposes a white hot reactive filament for the micro second before the FAE in your bathroom/ kitchen........

use sunlight when possible......
if not use CFL....not perfect, but better, ............and never turn ANYTHING OFF OR ON IN a solvent rich environment.....the switch itself micro sparks..........

consider "air tools" ....electric drills should be banned from solvent areas always........the cool thing about "air tools" is you can run the 50 ft hose anywhere.......

i have never seen a lab device that was "actually used" last long enough to be an heirloom........dont buy / use/ modify old electronic labware.......
all hotplates , stirrers, mantles etc, die horrible deaths......
yours will also, be prepared.............

use clamps / brackets and zip ties for everything.

we have proved using stoves and flame, and microwaves around solvents is insane......ventilation be damned.
consider the idea of "heating mantles" .........
hot plates are marginal , shit commonly blows up on them, and mag stirrers arent magical...........
( i am for cold mag stirring under mild water aspirator)

use an aspirator not a fan... a water aspirator cant blow you up.

realize fans and electronics collect dust............

show some engineering on liquids and electricity combos.........
glass breaks all the time, no biggie, unless it dampens a cord connection.
even water when tangling with electric can be deadly........

using "fish tank stuff" is crazy for many reasons.
shop on the internet.........know your plastics.
modern plastics are all marked.........they can substitute almost anything.

lexan and polycarbonate sheet makes ballistic /fire/electric shields that cant be beat.............

the best labs break ALOT of glass for no reason at all...........
glass just does that..........all alchemy aside, if ya have alot of glass,
you will face the shards...........
boro glass is not as warm and cuddly as ya think.......micro shards will haunt you.........

avoid mason type jars, we have absolutely banned them.........
as said, know your plastics. there is a replacment for everything.

transfer liquids with correct hoses.......
dont put solvents in the fridge.............

before and during evaporating ANYTHING , read the material data safety sheets,, and repeat " i will learn water aspirator vac evap" 3 times......

i saw "kitty litter" mentioned before, were up on that, except we cut out the middle man, and, load ours directly into custom sewn 20 lb burlap "sandbags".......if ya mount your lexan blast shields on wheels, the kitty litter sandbags make great base mounts..

imagine the need , should disaster arise, and, i can assure you some company on the web has a product for safety/ cleanup......study, and compare.......

oh , and it should be absolutely criminal to start any project without one dozen heavy duty contractor grade drum liner plastic bags.

all said, peeps, if we wanna stay alive long , we have got to be sharp.
:greenboun

#10 Morgoth

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Posted 01 April 2011 - 06:38 PM

Your time and efforts are well appreciated Phineas

Anne, great addition

I will be reading this to exhaustion to increase the safety and stealth of my lab

Thank you, so very much :bow::bow::bow:

#11 Deemster

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 11:45 PM

use all of these precautions (well done Phineas), but if you want to be extra sure to prevent harm to yourself, others, or property, use HDPE when possible. very easy to deal with and contain and it wont break or shatter. HDPE was made for STB! on another note be sure to cover your glass pan while evaporating in bestine or other solvent. had a close call with a friend and her cig. DANGA ZONE!

#12 Phineas_Carmichael

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 11:06 AM

Yeah, HDPE is perfectly fine for most clandestine chemistry, but if you went to a real chemistry lab, everything would be borosilicate glass. It is the gold standard for labware. HDPE is actually not *totally* lye-safe, if you leave a milk jug of highly alkaline solution lying around for any significant length of time, it will eventually leak and make a huge dangerous mess under your sink. Trust me, I know from experience...


Bottom line: HDPE is an acceptable substitute for borosilicate glass, but only for "quick & dirty" extractions; boro is best as a general rule.

#13 McDozd

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 01:42 PM

use all of these precautions (well done Phineas), but if you want to be extra sure to prevent harm to yourself, others, or property, use HDPE when possible. very easy to deal with and contain and it wont break or shatter. HDPE was made for STB! on another note be sure to cover your glass pan while evaporating in bestine or other solvent. had a close call with a friend and her cig. DANGA ZONE!


Why in the hell would you even let someone light up near a vaping dish or your lab area?
:weedpoke:

#14 gardenboy

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 05:33 PM

The 2nd Edition is available for free at archive.org [http://archive.org/details/TheOrganicChemLabSurvivalManual].

#15 Juthro

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 01:52 PM

Willie was taking chemistry,
but he doesn't any more.
For what he thought was H2O,
was H2SO4.:dead:

peace
Juth


#16 opiatoker

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 12:19 AM

Here is a list of horrible accidents that have occurred here at Topia over the years that I thought you should all know about before trying any of this dangerous stuff in your bathroom.

http://mycotopia.net...om-warning.html -- OMGWTFBBQ! I hope the OP in this thread is still alive.

http://mycotopia.net...olvent-sep.html -- A great discussion, and part of the inspiration for this Sticky.

http://mycotopia.net...html#post859374 -- The reason that we neutralize acidic and alkaline spills with Baking Soda.

http://mycotopia.net...-my-vision.html -- Here's one that makes me shudder... Post 16 is a great reinforcement of Zubrick's rule 7, NO BEVERAGES in the lab!

http://mycotopia.net...tml#post1070523 -- A reason to end your experiments as soon as possible and not keep things around just for frugality's sake.


If you have a lab accident, make a new thread about it and post the link here in this thread. I'll add it to the list.


:) Thank you for including my thread in one of the most important topics here! Kinda feeling like a celebrity now!! :)
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#17 director of sound

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    every thing is exactally the way it was aways suppose to be!

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 10:55 PM

Gotta look through my library, i thing i have some basic lab porcedure and lab safety manuals in .pdf form ill post up here.

#18 JanSteen

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 10:33 AM

Good write up!

Maybe I missed it but:

- Label your materials.

- Write everything down before you do it.

 

I've seen my fair share of lab-accidents happen at schools, erlenmeyers flying through the roof, unbalanced centrifuges, people spilling Cybrsafe on their hands, labcoats and each other.

Nitrogenous vapors without aeration in the room..

 

When there is no label, stuff can be anything from white wine to 18 molar sulfuric acid.

One gives you a hangover, the other makes you hang over (or whatever is left of your corpse).

 

Writing stuff down before you do it, forces you to think before you act.

In chemistry reactions can be faster than the blink of an eye, so it's better to blink a few times before you take a shot at losing that eye. Also, when shit goes wrong, you'll know where to look. Or the cleaning party sent out for the remains will know what they're dealing with.

 

 

"But what if we get busted?!" Yeah, if you get busted, they'll find out what you've been using and how you've been using it anyways. This can work two ways: having documentation lowers the costs of criminal research so it could come down to a lower punishment. The other way: they'll know about your secret ingredients, which could just as well be labeled XXX, as long as you label it and all the rest properly which will not have effect on your sentence.

If you don't label it, and get busted with illegal stuff, a clean-up guy could be harmed which translates in a heavier sentence. There is simply no excuse for not labeling things or not writing actions down. The label doesn't have to specify anything, but it sure makes things easier and safer to work with.


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#19 SteampunkScientist

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 06:49 PM

All excellent points! Always wear eye protection, lab gloves and clothing you don't care about.

Would you weld steel in a teeshirt, shorts and no eye protection? (If you do you're an idiot), then don't do it in the lab!

As one of my electrical engineering profs used to say: "Tarry not with the one who disregards safety, for he is not long in this world."

#20 Arathu

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 11:34 AM

All excellent points! Always wear eye protection, lab gloves and clothing you don't care about.

Would you weld steel in a teeshirt, shorts and no eye protection? (If you do you're an idiot), then don't do it in the lab!

As one of my electrical engineering profs used to say: "Tarry not with the one who disregards safety, for he is not long in this world."

At least stay back past the minimal safety distance for the arc flash.............hearing protection is of great value in that case also.................just an observation on my part. 

 

A






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