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MAOI Information and FAQ'S


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#1 MycoDani

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 08:01 PM

Hey Topiates, I know people wanted a sticky or some way to easily access information on MAOI's. Hippie3 compiled the best MAOI information I have ever had the pleasure of reading. I think this would be important to everyone who wants to find a quick easy reference to everything MAOI :)

I want to say this in no way is absolutely perfect there are risks to everything in life. We as Topiates should also educate ourselves as much as possible to avoid any dangers!

Thank you Hippie3 the work you did will carry on here :bow:

 

MAOI FAQ - DIETARY & DRUG INTERACTIONS / RESTRICTIONS
c & p from Mycotopia Web Archive: Ayahuasca-Ideas and tips
Interactions Between MAOIs, SSRIs, and Recreational Drugs
by Erowid
1. Avoid mixing MAOIs and SSRIs.
This can lead to serotonin syndrome and can be dangerous.
2. Do not mix MAOIs with Stimulants (including MDMA).
This can lead to hypertensive crisis and can be deadly.
3. SSRIs in Combination with MDMA
Generally reduces the effects of the MDMA significantly.
4. SSRIs in Combination with Psychedelics
Generally reduce the effects of the psychedelic a bit.
5. MAOIs in Combination with Psychedelics
Generally increase the effects of the psychedelic significantly. Be extremely careful.
SSRIs
Strong SSRIs are significantly more common than MAOIs. Many commonly prescribed pharmaceutical anti-depressants are SSRIs, including Prozac (Fluoxetine), Paxil (Paroxetine), Zoloft (Sertraline), Celexa (Citalopram), and Desyrel (Trazodone).
MAOIs
Strong MAOIs are less common, but include prescription anti-depressants like phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), isocarboxazid (Marplan), l-deprenyl (Eldepryl), moclobemide (Aurorex or Manerix), furazolidone, and pargyline. Ayahuasca also contains MAOIs, generally in the form of Banisteriopsis caapi or Syrian rue (harmine and harmaline).
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Foods to Avoid with MAOIs
From: [email protected] (Stephen R. Saklad)
Subject: Re: MAO-I's dietary restrictions
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 1994 23:05:01 -0600
© 1974-1994 Micromedex Inc. - All rights reserved - Vol. 82 Exp. 12/94
Tyramine is an amino acid which is found in various foods, and is an indirect sympathomimetic that can cause a hypertensive reaction in patients receiving MAOI therapy. Monoamine oxidase is found in the gastrointestinal tract and inactivates tyramine; when drugs prevent the catabolism of exogenous tyramine, this amino acid is absorbed and displaces norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve ending and epinephrine from the adrenal glands. If a sufficient amount of pressor amines are released, a patient may experience a severe occipital or temporal headache, diaphoresis, mydriasis, nuchal rigidity, palpitations, and the elevation of both diastolic and systolic blood pressure may ensue (Anon, 1989; Da Prada et al, 1988; Brown & Bryant, 1988).
On rare occasions, cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac failure, and intracerebral hemorrhage have developed in patients receiving MAOI therapy that did not observe dietary restrictions (Brown & Bryant, 1988). Therefore, dietary restrictions are required for patients receiving MAOIs. Extensive dietary restrictions previously published were collected over a decade ago and due to changes in food processing and more reliable analytical methods, new recommendations have been published (Anon, 1989; McCabe, 1986).
The tyramine content of foods varies greatly due to the differences in processing, fermentation, ripening, degradation, or incidental contamination. Many foods contain small amounts of tyramine and the formation of large quantities of tyramine have been reported if products were aged, fermented, or left to spoil. Because the sequela from tyramine and MAOIs is dose-related, reactions can be minimized without total abstinence from tyramine-containing foods.Approximately 10 to 25 mg of tyramine is required for a severe reaction compared to 6 to 10 mg for a mild reaction. Foods that normally contain low amounts of tyramine may become a risk if unusually large quantities are consumed or if spoilage has occurred (McCabe, 1986).
Three lists were compiled (foods to avoid, foods that may used in small quantities, and foods with insufficient evidence to restrict) to minimized the strict dietary restrictions that were previously used and improve compliance and safety of MAOI therapy. The foods to avoid list consists of foods with sufficient tyramine (in small or usual serving sizes) that would create a dangerous elevation in blood pressure and therefore should be avoided (McCabe, 1986)
FOODS TO AVOID
# Alcoholic beverages Avoid Chianti wine and vermouth.
# Consumption of red, white, and port wine in quantities less than 120 mL present little risk (Anon, 1989; Da Prada et al, 1988; McCabe, 1986).
# Beer and ale should also be avoided (McCabe, 1986), however other investigators feel major domestic (US) brands of beer is safe in small quantities (½ cup or less than 120 mL) (Anon, 1989; Da Prada, 1988), but imported beer should not be consumed unless a specific brand is known to be safe.
# Whiskey and liqueurs such as Drambuie and Chartreuse have caused reactions.
# Nonalcoholic beverages (alcohol-free beer and wines) may contain tyramine and should be avoided (Anon, 1989; Stockley, 1993).
# Banana peels A single case report implicates a banana as the causative agent, which involved the consumption of whole stewed green banana, including the peel. Ripe banana pulp contains 7 µg/gram of tyramine compared to a peel which contains 65 µg/gram and 700 µg of tyramine and dopamine, respectively (McCabe, 1986).
# Bean curd Fermented bean curd, fermented soya bean, soya bean pastes contain a significant amount of tyramine (Anon, 1989).
# Broad (fava) bean pods These beans contain dopa, not tyramine, which is metabolized to dopamine and may cause a pressor reaction and therefore should not be eaten particularly if overripe (McCabe, 1986; Anon, 1989; Brown & Bryant, 1988).
# Cheese Tyramine content cannot be predicted based on appearance, flavor, or variety and therefore should be avoided.
# Cream cheese and cottage cheese have no detectable level of tyramine (McCabe, 1986; Anon, 1989, Brown & Bryant, 1988).
# Fish Fresh fish (Anon, 1989; McCabe, 1986) and vacuum-packed pickled fish or caviar contain only small amounts of tyramine and are safe if consumed promptly or refrigerated for short periods; longer storage may be dangerous (Anon, 1989).
# Smoked, fermented, pickled (Herring) and otherwise aged fish, meat, or any spoiled food may contain high levels of tyramine and should be avoided (Anon, 1989; Brown & Bryant, 1988).
# Ginseng Some preparations have resulted in a headache, tremulousness, and manic-like symptoms (Anon, 1989).
# Protein extracts Three brands of meat extract contained 95, 206, and 304 µg/gram of tyramine and therefore meat extracts should be avoided (McCabe, 1986).
# Avoid liquid and powdered protein dietary supplements (Anon, 1989).
# Meat nonfresh or liver
# no detectable levels identified in fresh chicken livers
# high tyramine content found in spoiled or unfresh livers (McCabe, 1986).
# Fresh meat is safe, caution suggested in restaurants (Anon, 1989; Da Prada et al, 1988).
# Sausage, bologna, pepperoni and salami contain large amounts of tyramine (Anon, 1989; Da Prada et al, 1988; McCabe, 1986).
# No detectable tyramine levels were identified in country cured ham (McCabe, 1986).
# Sauerkraut Tyramine content has varied from 20 to 95 µg/gram and should be avoided (McCabe, 1986).
# Shrimp paste Contain a large amount of tyramine (Anon, 1989).
# Soups Should be avoided as protein extracts may be present; miso soup is prepared from fermented bean curd and contain tyramine in large amounts and should not be consumed (Anon, 1989).
# Yeast Brewer's or extracts - yeast extracts (Marmite) which are spread on bread or mixed with water,
# Brewer's yeast, or Yeast vitamin supplements should not be consumed.
# Yeast used in baking is safe (Anon, 1989; Da Prada et al, 1988; McCabe, 1986).
The foods to use with caution list categorizes foods that have been reported to cause a hypertensive crisis if foods were consumed in large quantities, stored for prolong periods, or if contamination occurred. Small servings (½ cup, or less than 120 mL) of the following foods are not expected to pose a risk for patients on MAOI therapy (McCabe, 1986).
FOODS TO USE WITH CAUTION
(½ cup or less than 120 mL)
Alcoholic beverages - see under foods to avoid.
Avocados - contain tyramine, particularly overripe (Anon, 1989) but may be used in small amounts if not overripened (McCabe, 1986).
Caffeine - contains a weak pressor agent, large amounts may cause a reaction (Anon, 1989).
Chocolate - is safe to ingest for most patients, unless consumed in large amounts (Anon, 1989; McCabe, 1986).
Dairy products - Cream, sour cream, cottage cheese, cream cheese, yogurt, or milk should pose little risk unless prolonged storage or lack of sanitation standards exists (Anon, 1989; McCabe, 1986). Products should not be used if close to the expiration date (McCabe, 1986).
Nuts - large quantities of peanuts were implicated in a hypertensive reaction and headache. Coconuts and brazil nuts have also been implicated, however no analysis of the tyramine content was performed (McCabe, 1986).
Raspberries - contain tyramine and small amounts are expected to be safe (McCabe, 1986).
Soy sauce - has been reported to contain large amounts of tyramine and reactions have been reported with teriyaki (Anon, 1989), however analysis of soy sauce reveals a tyramine level of 1.76 µg/mL and fermented meat may have contributed to the previously reported reactions (McCabe, 1986).
Spinach, New Zealand prickly or hot weather - large amounts have resulted in a reaction (Anon, 1989; McCabe, 1986).
More than 200 foods contain tyramine in small quantities and have been implicated in reactions with MAOI therapy, however the majority of the previous reactions were due to the consumption of spoiled food. Evidence does not support the restriction of the following foods listed if the food is fresh (McCabe, 1986).
FOODS WITH INSUFFICIENT EVIDENCE FOR RESTRICTION (McCabe, 1986)
* anchovies
* beetroot
* chips with vinegar
* Coca cola
* cockles
* coffee
* corn, sweet
* cottage cheese
* cream cheese
* cucumbers
* egg, boiled
* figs, canned
* fish, canned
* junket
* mushrooms
* pineapple, fresh
* raisins
* salad dressings
* snails
* tomato juice
* wild game
* worcestershire sauce
* yeast-leavened bread
Any protein food, improperly stored or handled, can form pressor amines through protein breakdown. Chicken and beef liver, liver pate, and game generally contain high amine levels due to frequent mishandling. Game is often allowed to partially decompose as part of its preparation. Ayd (1986) reported that the freshness of the food is a key issue with MAOIs and that as long as foods are purchased from reputable shops and stored properly, the danger of a hypertensive crisis is minimal. Some foods should be avoided, the most dangerous being aged cheeses and yeast products used as food supplements (Gilman et al, 1985).
With appropriate dietary restrictions, the incidence of hypertensive crises has decreased to approximately 4% (Zisook, 1985). Treatment of a hypertensive reactions includes the=7F administration of phentolamine (Anon, 1989) 2.5 to 5 milligrams intravenously (slow) titrated against blood pressure (Zisook,=7F 1985; Lippman & Nash, 1990). One report has suggested that the use of sublingual nifedipine 10 milligrams was effective in treating 2 hypertensive reactions following the ingestion of a tyramine-containing food in a patient receiving MAOI therapy (Clary & Schweizerr, 1987). Chlorpromazine also has alpha-blocking properties and has been recommended as an agent for discretionary use (patient-initiated treatment) in the setting of dietary indiscretion (Lippman & Nash, 1990).
CONCLUSION:
Dietary restrictions are required for individuals receiving monoamine oxidase inhibitor therapy to prevent a hypertensive crisis and other side effects. The foods listed in the dietary restrictions have been categorized into those foods that must be avoided, foods that may be ingested in small quantities, and those foods that were previous implicated in reactions but upon analyses of fresh samples only a small tyramine content was identified and should be safe to consume if freshness is considered.
REFERENCES:
1. Anon: Foods interacting with MAOI inhibitors. Med Lett Drug Ther 1989; 31:11-12.
2. Ayd FJ: Diet and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs): an update. Int Drug Ther Newslett 1986; 21:19-20.
3. Brown CS & Bryant SG: Monoamine oxidase inhibitors: safety and efficacy issues. Drug Intell Clin Pharm 1988; 22:232-235.
4. Clary C & Schweizer E: Treatment of MAOI hypertensive crisis with sublingual nifedipine. J Clin Psychiatry 1987; 48:249-250.
5. Da Prada M, Zurcher G, Wuthrich I et al: On tyramine, food, beverages and the reversible MAO inhibitor moclobemide. J Neural Transm 1988; 26(Suppl):31-56.
6. Gilman AG, Goodman LS & Rall TW et al (Ed): Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 7th ed., Macmillan Publishing, New York, NY, 1985.
7. Lippman SB & Nash K: Monoamine oxidase inhibitor update. Potential adverse food and drug interactions. Drug Safety 1990; 5:195-204.
8. McCabe BJ: Dietary tyramine and other pressor amines in MAOI regimens: a review. J Am Diet Assoc 1986; 86:1059-1064.
9. Stockley I: Alcohol-free beer not safe for MAOI patients. Pharm J 1993; 250:174.
10. Zisook S: A clinical overview of monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Psychosomatics 1985; 26:240-251.
AUTHOR INFORMATION:
Theodore G Tong, Pharm D/C Hansen
Assistant Clinical Professor of Pharmacy
University of California
San Franscisco, California 94143
10/79
Revised by DRUGDEX Editorial Staff
Denver, Colorado 80204, 09/82
Revised by DRUGDEX Editorial Staff, 09/83; 07/85; 07/86; 09/89; 04/93; 01/94
* Meats and Fish
o Liver of all kinds
o pate
o Pickled herring and other pickled fish
o Game (venison, etc.)
o Caviar
o Snails (escargot)
o Salted fish (lox)
o Pastrami
o Corned beef
o Sausages (salami, etc)
o Boveril
* Fruits and Vegetables
o pods of broad beans
o English beans
o Chinese pea pods
o Miso and miso soup
o Fava beans
o Overripe fruit (especially bananas and Avocados)
o Raisins and other dried fruits
o Pickles of any type
o Sauerkraut
o Canned Figs
* Dairy Products
o All cheeses (Except for cream, cottage, farmer and ricotta)
o Frozen yogurt (Fresh yogurt is OK up to the expiration date on the container)
o Sour cream
* Beverages
o Red wine
o Beer and ale (including alcohol-free)
o Champagne
o Sherry
o Brandy
o Liqueurs and fruit brandies
o Cognac
o (Truly moderate amounts of white wine, gin or vodka are OK)
o Over four servings of caffeine-containing drinks such as coffee, cola drinks, etc.
* Miscellaneous
o Soy sauce
o Brewers yeast (Bread, cake, cookies etc. are OK as they do not contain brewers yeast)
o Marmite
o Licorice
o Over one ounce of chocolate
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Drugs to Avoid with MAOIs
It's not totally understood how various MAOIs interact with the body. Some are more likely to have negative interactions with foods and drugs than others. To be as safe as possible, avoid the following drugs while you are taking an MAOI antidepressant and for two weeks after stopping it.
* All SSRIs (prozac, zoloft, and several other anti-depressants)
SSRIs block the reuptake of serotonin in the brain. Because MAOIs inhibit the breakdown of serotonin, the combination of MAOIs and SSRIs can lead to dangerously high levels of serotonin in the brain (serotonin syndrome). Symptoms of serotonin syndrome include nausea, vomiting, blackouts, memory loss, increased blood pressure and increased heart rate.
* Demerol
* Cold preparations (tablets, capsules, or liquids such as Comtrex)
* Cough medications containing decongestants, Dextromethorphan (DXM)1, or Demerol
* Sinus medications
* Nose drops or nasal sprays
* Nasal decongestants
* Hay fever medications
* Diet pills
* Amphetamines --- speed
* MDMA --- Ecstasy
* MDE, MDA, and other "MD" compounds
* Cocaine --- crack
MAOIs can and will dramatically increase the effects of some of these drugs to the point of becoming dangerous. Other plants and chemicals are intentionally combined with some reversible MAOIs (plants such as Syrian rue or Banisteriopsis caapi , or their primary active chemicals the harmala alkaloids) to intentionally increase the effects of chemicals such as DMT (as is done in many forms of the Ayahuasca brew) or sometimes phenethylamines such as Mescaline or 2-CB. All of these "potentiating" combinations can be dangerous if used improperly.

 


Edited by Sidestreet, 26 October 2016 - 04:52 AM.


#2 BlueBruiser

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 09:39 AM

Nice work guys.... Quite a long read but since these interactions can kill you it is worth it!

#3 SeaUrchin

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 08:38 PM

thank you so much for posting this! i have about a gram of 10x Harmaline extract powder, and a number of things to dose with... I am a vegetarian, but also have no problem fasting for a whole day, if needed. Any advice as to dosage with the harm aline?

#4 professoressa

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Posted 17 January 2012 - 08:50 PM

Not to be an add-on glommer, a friend who takes Rx anti-depressants, including Invega and Lamictal related to me that they had taken 3 gms of dried cubes and it had no effect other than making colors brighter. Another acquaintance, not taking anti-depressant medication, related they took 4 gms. of this same cube batch and had moments requiring holding on to the sofa.

#5 MycoDani

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 07:17 AM

First of all you should not take an antipsychotic or a neuroleptic with mushrooms!

IMO it's dangerous and really silly. I take antidepressants and trip but I titrate down on my med!
The lamictal technically is an antiseizure medication so I would ween off that as well if you friend wants to trip.

Your friends problem is the lack of titration when taking mushrooms! Some can eat 3 grams and it does nothing while other times it knocks your socks off.

IMHO do not trip on medications like Invega and Lamictal. Invega is a new neuroleptic that is supposedly cleaner than risperidone the verdict is still out but one thing I must stress is DO NOT TAKE antpsychotics with mushrooms it's really counterproductive and a waste of good shrooms!

I hope things are clearer for you now.
Happy Trails~Dani
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#6 Hypervision

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 03:14 PM

Could some1 just prepare a safe lunchbox for me?

If SWIM were to consume capsulated Sryrian Rue, what should they eat for the day?
-IDK if it matters but they plan on using it in conjuction with smoked dmt.

-please be specific dont say 'light' foods- say apple or lettuce or a lunchable like that-

#7 professoressa

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 05:26 PM

Thanks MycoDani - I guess it pretty much all about Serotonin and the 5HT receptor. This comment was shared because someone might be having a similar problem, "What's up with these Shrooms"? I completely agree with you about all the neuroleptic meds. They turn into a crutch for some, then there's always tardive dyskinesia.

In your opinion to titrate down the levels how many days would you suggest? BTW, Johns Hopkins is doing a study of psilocybin as a potential adjunct long-term mood elevator.

Edited by professoressa, 20 January 2012 - 05:35 PM.
spelling


#8 MycoDani

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 05:51 PM

Thanks MycoDani - I guess it pretty much all about Serotonin and the 5HT receptor. This comment was shared because someone might be having a similar problem, "What's up with these Shrooms"? I completely agree with you about all the neuroleptic meds. They turn into a crutch for some, then there's always tardive dyskinesia.

In your opinion to titrate down the levels how many days would you suggest? BTW, Johns Hopkins is doing a study of psilocybin as a potential adjunct long-term mood elevator.


Oh I wished you would have joined sooner they were sponsoring us for awhile and I as well as many did the survey they had it's quite exciting! :amazed:

Your damn right imo it all comes down to the 5-HT receptors and what has an affinity to them;) Mushrooms like 5-HT Receptors a lot and Invega or any neuroleptic obviously as you know put a dampen on the party. So in your friends case I would only titrate for 3-4 days max is all i do with Abilify though I barely take it anymore but, I am on Elavil so I have to adjust to trip the way I should.

Any more than 5 days you get sick if you go cold turkey what I do: I am not a doctor nor do I proclaim to be one!! what works for me is not a one size fit! Ok I don't want anyone trying this because I do it. Temet Nosce people and even then have someone you trust near by!

I lower my Elavil by skipping one day to lower the blood level right away. Then I half dose to a quarter then I will stop the med and trip the next night. This is what I do and it works well at the end of the trip when the comedown is over I will take my med to get it back in my system. Now I'm sure you know of Serotonin Syndrome and I put myself in a precarious situation some may think.

I have been doing this since I was put on meds at 15 so I know my limits but that is an idea of a titration. The best way is au natural we all know that. Some of us on meds though have to adjust accordingly and must know there body.The Invega is what scares me it can be done but it's such a powerful neuroleptic I will do some more research on that.

I hope I helped in any way I can PM me if ever you need help or want to chat!:heart:
Mahalo~Dani
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#9 MrLiberty

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 12:18 AM

I've been looking but have not found an answer. Is one able to mix MAOI'S? Like only passion flower and b. Cappi/ syrian rue. All of then being harmine alkaloids one might think its okay? Or is there something that might interact? Of corse dosages of each would have to lessened to avoid over-potentiation. But I was jw if this was safe. Better safe then sorry.

#10 witchdr11

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 12:31 AM

https://mycotopia.ne...-maoi-info.html

#11 witchdr11

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 12:40 AM

you can mix harmaline like rue caapi but I have no idea about "hard" pharma maoi. In MY experience you can nearly ignore all maoi restrictions with harmaline based maoi. I have eaten piles of tyrosine foods and drinks while under caapi and rue effects.

Tyrosine basically displaces Organic maoi's. Buzzkill yes, tyrosine overdose...highly unlikely..

Pharma maoi's are different and can completely wipe out this enzyme production so their is nothing to stop the tyrosine from building up.

I think there is much potential in the use of harmalines for antidepressents, much as the pharma maois were meant to do. When those lost favor the plant derivatives of the idea were ignored of course. It isn't profitable to have you healing yourself with common vines and seeds.
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#12 MrLiberty

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Posted 08 February 2012 - 01:14 AM

Awesome! Thank you. I have been wondering this for some time now. And also on the above listed it says aged meats line salami, bologna etc are considered unsafe. But would like just a regular ribeye(yum) be safe because really all steaks in say a restaurant are aged at least 18 days before cooking. So would tyramine levels be s?ufficient to cause a, reaction in that case

#13 witchdr11

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Posted 08 February 2012 - 08:39 AM

Awesome! Thank you. I have been wondering this for some time now. And also on the above listed it says aged meats line salami, bologna etc are considered unsafe. But would like just a regular ribeye(yum) be safe because really all steaks in say a restaurant are aged at least 18 days before cooking. So would tyramine levels be s?ufficient to cause a, reaction in that case


Eating a fat salami sandwich and a few ales will probably bring you back to earth if anything is what I am saying. This said, I don't go tempting the devil unless I really want something.
Also I wanted to note that in my post that "tyrosine" should be "tyramine".

Here's an article I actually just read. It is talking about pharma maoi though.

http://www.ccjm.org/... /><br /><br />

#14 MrLiberty

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Posted 08 February 2012 - 01:02 PM

So is that what you mean by "tyramine basically displaces organic maois?" Like it would stop the potentiating effects

#15 Sidestreet

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 06:02 AM

I recently got a few different varieties of B. Caapi which I won in World Seed Supply's Sampler Auction. I wanted to revisit safety measures for taking MAOIs and came across this elsewhere. It looks like it's from Toad. You know, Toad Toad but who can be certain. Anyway, it looks correct and concise, although it says that some of our favorite MAOIs are OK to mix with tyramine-containing foods, which I've never heard before:

D_M_T_Toad:

Since this forum contains information on entheogens, I wanted to make a topic about Serotonin Syndrome. I decided to post it here because the Aya forum is where people talk most about MAOI's, such as Syrian Rue and Banisteriopsis Caapi. Serotonin Syndrome is a reaction caused from mixing certain drugs with MAOIs or caused by taking too much of one drug. From my understanding, if you take too much of one drug, it releases too much serotonin into your brain. The real issue here though is to inform people of the dangers of MAOIs. Here is a list of the symptoms of Serotonin Syndrome:

Cognitive Effects: mental confusion, hypomania, hallucinations, agitation, headache, coma

Autonomic Effects: shivering, sweating, hyperthermia, hypertension, tachycardia, nausea, diarrhea

Somatic Effects: myoclonus (muscle twitching), hyperreflexia (manifested by clonus), tremor.

As research shows, there are 3 severeties of Serotonin Syndrome. I have Broken them down here as Mild, Moderate, and Severe, each with there own list of symptoms.

Mild Symptoms May Include: Increased Heart Rate
Shivering
Sweating
Dialated Pupils
Involuntary Muscle Twitching
Overresponsive Reflexes
Headache

Moderate Symptoms: Hyperactive Bowel Sounds
High Blood Pressure
Hyperthermia (Tempurature of 104 °F)
Clonus Throughout the Body, More so in the Lower Limbs (Series of involuntary muscle spasms)
Hypervigilance & Agitation

Severe Symptoms: Severe Increase in Heart Rate and Blood Pressure (This may lead to Shock)
Tempurature May Rise to 106 °F (Or above in Life Threatening Cases)
Metabolic acidosis (Can lead to Coma and Death
Rhabdomyolysis (Rapid Breakdown of Skeletal Muscle)
Seizures
Renal Failure (Kidney Failure)
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (Blood Clots form Throughout the Body)


Now, Syrian Rue and Caapi are reversable MAOIs, which means they are very short acting. I'm not sure about Caapi, but Syrian Rue only stays in the gut for about 6 hours. Two other plant forms of MAOIs include Passionflower and Yohimbe. Other, irr-reversible MAOIs include are Nardil and Parnate. Withe the irriversables, you shouldn't take anything that can compromise your health, be it food, SSRIs, or certain drugs, for two weeks before or after the MAOI. Moclobemide is said to be reversible, but I am unsure of this and caution should be taken anyways. While taking any MAOI, the following drugs should be avoided:

All SSRIs (prozac, zoloft, and several other anti-depressants)
Demerol
Cold preparations (tablets, capsules, or liquids such as Comtrex)
Cough medications containing decongestants, Dextromethorphan (DXM)1, or Demerol
Sinus medications
Nose drops or nasal sprays
Nasal decongestants
Hay fever medications
Diet pills
Amphetamines --- speed
MDMA --- Ecstasy
MDE, MDA, and other "MD" compounds
Cocaine --- crack

While taking a reversible MAOI, such as Syrian Rue and Caapi, it is OK to eat these foods. These MAOIs do not block your body from breaking down tryamine. Ott talks about it in his Tihkal entry on Syrian Rue. If you are taking a irreversable MAOI, the following food should be avoided:

Alcoholic beverages
Avoid Chianti wine and vermouth.
Consumption of red, white, and port wine in quantities less than 120 mL present little risk (Anon, 1989; Da Prada et al, 1988; McCabe, 1986).
Beer and ale should also be avoided (McCabe, 1986), however other investigators feel major domestic (US) brands of beer is safe in small quantities (½ cup or less than 120 mL) (Anon, 1989; Da Prada, 1988), but imported beer should not be consumed unless a specific brand is known to be safe.
Whiskey and liqueurs such as Drambuie and Chartreuse have caused reactions.
Nonalcoholic beverages (alcohol-free beer and wines) may contain tyramine and should be avoided (Anon, 1989; Stockley, 1993).


Banana peels
A single case report implicates a banana as the causative agent, which involved the consumption of whole stewed green banana, including the peel. Ripe banana pulp contains 7 µg/gram of tyramine compared to a peel which contains 65 µg/gram and 700 µg of tyramine and dopamine, respectively (McCabe, 1986).


Bean curd
Fermented bean curd, fermented soya bean, soya bean pastes contain a significant amount of tyramine (Anon, 1989).


Broad (fava) bean pods
These beans contain dopa, not tyramine, which is metabolized to dopamine and may cause a pressor reaction and therefore should not be eaten particularly if overripe (McCabe, 1986; Anon, 1989; Brown & Bryant, 1988).


Cheese
Tyramine content cannot be predicted based on appearance, flavor, or variety and therefore should be avoided.
Cream cheese and cottage cheese have no detectable level of tyramine (McCabe, 1986; Anon, 1989, Brown & Bryant, 1988).


Fish
Fresh fish (Anon, 1989; McCabe, 1986) and vacuum-packed pickled fish or caviar contain only small amounts of tyramine and are safe if consumed promptly or refrigerated for short periods; longer storage may be dangerous (Anon, 1989).
Smoked, fermented, pickled (Herring) and otherwise aged fish, meat, or any spoiled food may contain high levels of tyramine and should be avoided (Anon, 1989; Brown & Bryant, 1988).


Ginseng
Some preparations have resulted in a headache, tremulousness, and manic-like symptoms (Anon, 1989).


Protein extracts
Three brands of meat extract contained 95, 206, and 304 µg/gram of tyramine and therefore meat extracts should be avoided (McCabe, 1986).
Avoid liquid and powdered protein dietary supplements (Anon, 1989).


Meat
nonfresh or liver
no detectable levels identified in fresh chicken livers
high tyramine content found in spoiled or unfresh livers (McCabe, 1986).
Fresh meat is safe, caution suggested in restaurants (Anon, 1989; Da Prada et al, 1988).
Sausage, bologna, pepperoni and salami contain large amounts of tyramine (Anon, 1989; Da Prada et al, 1988; McCabe, 1986).
No detectable tyramine levels were identified in country cured ham (McCabe, 1986).


Sauerkraut
Tyramine content has varied from 20 to 95 µg/gram and should be avoided (McCabe, 1986).


Shrimp paste
Contain a large amount of tyramine (Anon, 1989).

Soups
Should be avoided as protein extracts may be present; miso soup is prepared from fermented bean curd and contain tyramine in large amounts and should not be consumed (Anon, 1989).

Yeast
Brewer's or extracts - yeast extracts (Marmite) which are spread on bread or mixed with water,
Brewer's yeast, or Yeast vitamin supplements should not be consumed.
Yeast used in baking is safe (Anon, 1989; Da Prada et al, 1988; McCabe, 1986).


Please take the time to inform yourself about Serotonin Syndrome! It is very important, especially if you decide to igest an MAOI. I give much credit to Erowid and Wikipedia for my information, and the links to the info are posted below. Stay safe everyone!

If the mods read this, could you please sticky it? This is a very important topic and everyone should read it.

http://www.erowid.or...ois/maois.shtml
http://en.wikipedia....otonin_syndrome
  • wildedibles likes this

#16 MycoDani

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 09:04 AM

I will sticky it for you SS great job with putting that up it will go well with the MAOI warnings in Botanicals excellent my friend!:thumbup:

EDIT: Merged with MAOI for easy reference.

Edited by MycoDani, 27 November 2012 - 05:47 PM.
added sticky


#17 bezevo

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 10:27 PM

I  take over  the counter  5HTP  are there any  reactions to that ?



#18 Sidestreet

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 04:51 AM

5 HTP is not an MAOI.  Some people use it as an MDMA enhancer: https://mycotopia.ne...reloadpostload/






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