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Psilocybe tampanensis on agar first agar attempt ever.


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#21 arezap

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 06:49 AM

sclerotia is meant to grow best on 4% MEA


Yeah, the 4% is a pretty standard thing but I am not trying for stones. I want fruits to print blackout. All the stone producer prints are pricey. There has to be some kind of tek to get them to fruit and print or the vendors wouldn't have any. From what I understand the casings of stone producers usually contam way long before they get to fruit, you should use a peat casing and powdered calcium carbonate instead of lime. Those tidbits are the only things I've found. Freakachino said papashroom had some luck fruiting a stone producer, Mex a I think she said, but he hasn't been on the boards in a while.

#22 blackout

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 11:11 AM

I was reading again and it was 4.5% agar that produced stones. 0.45% agar had the best results for fruits, it fruited on the agar, mexicana anyway. Workman once recommended a low % sugar LC to me before but gave no reason why. In TMC is said tamp can fruit on manure too. Mex A is best for sclerotia, Mex B for fruits.

This is from TMC for fruiting Tamps
Spawn Media: Annual rye grass seed, wheat grass seed or rye grain.
Fruiting Substrate: Cased rye grass seed (and possibly rye grain); leached cow manure; some
potting soils; and enriched malt agar media. This species will probably fruit on cased pasteurized
wheat straw.
Method of Preparation: Rye grass seed combined with water in a 2:1 volumetric proportion,
preferably soaked overnight. Sterilize for 1 hour at 15 psi. Wheat straw is pasteurized in a hot water
bath at 160-170°F. for 20 minutes.

Spawn Run:
Relative Humidity: 90 + %.
Substrate temperature: 75-81 °F.
Duration: 10-14 days.
CO2: 10,000 ppm or higher.
Fresh Air Exchanges: 0 per hour.
Type of Casing: Standard peat based casing whose preparation is described in Chapter VIII. Layer
to a depth of '/2 to 1 inch.

Post Casing/Pre-pinning:
Substrate temperature: 75-81 °F.
Relative humidity: 90 + %.
CO2- 10,000 ppm or above.
Fresh Air Exchanges: 0 per hour.
Light: Incubation in darkness.

Primordia Formation:
Relative Humidify: 85-92%.
Air Temperature: 71-74°F.
C02: 5000 ppm or below.
Fresh Air Exchanges: 2 per hour.
Light requirements: Diffuse natural or grow-lights for 12 hours/day.

Cropping:
Relative humidity: 85-92%.
Air Temperature: 71-74°F.
COz- 5000 ppm or below.
Fresh Air Exchanges: 2 per hour.
Harvest Stage: When the caps become nearly plane.
Light requirements: Diffuse natural or grow-lights for 12 hours/day.
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#23 arezap

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 12:01 PM

Fantastic ! That's the stuff I've been looking for! Thank you blackout! You got yourself a print of these or any other print from the 40+ strains I have when I succeed. Notice I didn't say if I succeed . I will succeed but just don't know when yet. I'm getting another isolate of this strain to try soon. I'm starting to research things about humidity,air exchange in semi-closed loop environments, and a few other things. I got some ideas for a closed loop temp/humidity controlled fruiting chamber and importing hepa filtered air for the exchanges but still in the tinkering with it in my head stage. It seems I'll have to strictly control all environmental factors which I find difficult at best with mono/dub tubs so something else is needed imo.

#24 TVCasualty

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 08:38 PM

I have a question for anybody who's worked with sclerotia: Can the stones fruit?

This ? is based on two things; one is that the literature says sclerotia are produced by various fungi so the fungus can survive difficult conditions (like being in a jar unable to fruit). The other is that Morel Mountain, that defunct indoor morel farm, grew them by first producing sclerotia and then putting the stones in trays, where they fruited. Their big discovery was finding/isolating the strain that did it indoors efficiently. Their big mistake is another story...

I was told by a former employee that they made morel sclerotia by filling a jar partway with grain, putting in a piece of screen, then filling most of the rest of the jar with casing soil. They obviously didn't shake these, and after the grain colonized it sent mycelium into the casing where the stones were formed. Then they just dumped out the stones and fruited them. Wonder if tamps or mex would work similarly?

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 09:12 PM

as i understand it its critical to incorporate sclerotia in yer spawn
if lookin for prolific fruitin

#26 BuckarooBanzai

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 10:36 PM

I don't know about cubie sclerotia, but I can tell you for certain that other mushie sclerotium can produce fruit. Shortly after I discoverd this hobby I had a BLAST planting/fruiting a "King Tuber" sclerotia from Fungi Perfecti with my nephew. He hated that word sclerotia, though (6 year olds have trouble pronouncing latin). He insisted on calling it the "mushroom egg."

Dude, sharing his amazement watching that thing appear and mature was better than MOST of the trips I've taken!

#27 Workman

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 11:35 PM

Fantastic ! That's the stuff I've been looking for! Thank you blackout!

Geez, sorry arezap, I thought everyone had "The Mushroom Cultivator". I could have given you those parameters.
And yes, mushrooms can grow directly from the sclerotia.

Mexicana A

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#28 Guest_cap_*

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 11:46 PM

adorable pictie Workman :)

for anyone in need, The Mushroom Cultivator is available right here as an e-book
click the last "/\" in my sig for the download from the 'topia archives--thx hipp!:bow:

#29 arezap

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 01:04 AM

Sorry, not much of a book collection but yeah, this was the type of stuff I was looking for. Growth parameters and fruiting conditions etc. Success with various substrates and tecniques is helpfull. This is basically what I'm also trying to do with the Oh Canada's too. Get them to fruit. I have to update pics and things in that thread soon.

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 01:20 AM

Success with various substrates and tecniques is helpfull.

IMO, a 'Big Thread on Sclerotia producing varieties' may be in order to organize thoughts,
and collectively come to a conclusion on what works best, or is most productive for fruiting
..just an idea

as for sclerotia production,
i have gathered from rappin' with various heads around here,
as well as readin the boards and archives for about 5 years,
that sclerotia-producing Psilo. species do best on berries.
popular belief is rye grass seed, which may be better for fruiting, i dont know,
but a couple very experienced stone-people have told me in that berries produce best

we all know the coffee trick, too--
what i wanna know is; does the coffee aid in fruiting in anyone's iincidental,or premeditated trials?

#31 blackout

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 07:02 AM

i have gathered from rappin' with various heads around here,
as well as readin the boards and archives for about 5 years,
that sclerotia-producing Psilo. species do best on berries.
popular belief is rye grass seed, which may be better for fruiting, i dont know,
but a couple very experienced stone-people have told me in that berries produce best

I have read a lot about sclerotia. It is only Roger that I have seen raving about coffe & rye berries. Not sure if I saw anybody else get good results. My wheat berries/grains did very poorly for sclerotia, while my RGS was good, from the same MS LC.
I think I have seen others reporting poor grows with normal rye grain too. Maybe the coffee in the grains makes a huge difference. I know workman trys new strains on RGS to fruit first.

#32 blackout

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 07:04 AM

Fantastic ! That's the stuff I've been looking for! Thank you blackout! You got yourself a print of these or any other print from the 40+ strains I have when I succeed.

You're welcome, and thanks for the offer of a print, I hope you do succeed soon. TMC is a great book, well worth a read, I picked it up cheap on ebay, only wish Stamets would go back and revise and update it. 22years old now, I chase women younger than it!

#33 Guest_cap_*

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 07:10 AM

good stuff blackout...i was hopin my reply would stir up some good convo:D

i appreciate yer feedback and im sure arezap does too

i have no experience with these so definitely want to hear from as many folks as possible

mexicana A is what my points were in reference to,
do you find this to be true for all species youve worked with?

be well

#34 blackout

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 10:42 AM

Dont think I ever tried rye or wheat grain with mex A. Only with atlantis. Didn't work for me and some others. I will try and dig out those threads. It did work for Roger and I have no reason to doubt him at all, not like it is some newbie claiming stuff in the hope others will try it for him.

Hopefully Roger will add his experience to this thread. I would also love to hear from Stephen L. Peele who has a book dedicated to growing sclerotia.

I have always been disappointed, not to mention confused, with the lack of interest and experimentation with sclerotia.

www.mushroomsfmrc.com is suspended for some reason hope everything is ok.

#35 arezap

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 11:25 AM

... Stephen L. Peele who has a book dedicated to growing sclerotia.

I have always been disappointed, not to mention confused, with the lack of interest and experimentation with sclerotia.

www.mushroomsfmrc.com is suspended for some reason hope everything is ok.


Do you know the title of the book? I hope everything is alright as well since the site is down.

#36 Guest_lost_onabbey_rd_*

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 11:30 AM

i bleave the title of the book blackout is talking about is.. the golden doorknob
LOST

#37 arezap

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 06:32 AM

What do you think ?

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1146655938

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1146655938

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1146655938

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1146655938

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#38 Lazlo

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 06:48 AM

It appears to have some bacteria in the agar Arezap. How long are you pc'ing the medium? I would transfer the growth @ 5 o'clock in the pictured plate to a new plate of antibiotic agar. Select some of the other healthy growth for new plates as well. Harvest the mycelium only, leaving behind as much of the contaminated agar as possible.

#39 arezap

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 07:02 AM

I believe you're right Lazlo. Thx for the input. I'm sure the spores themselves were the cause. The plate was a pre poured purchase and the spores were questionable. I don't have antibiotic agar at the moment but Workman has been kind enough to donate to me a new print of these and it is on it's way. I may just refrigerate this plate till I can get some antibiotic agar.I'm goning to go with rgs for sclerotia formation.

#40 Workman

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 01:22 PM

Interesting plate. Yes there is some bacterial contamination, but I see another problem as well. The small colonies in the center are likely tampanensis mycelium, but the white areas on the top and bottom definately are not. That pure white ropey mycelium is classic cubensis. You appear to be the victim of cubensis contamination. The growth near the edges indicates airborne contamination so you must have many cubensis spores floating in your work space. Tampanensis mycelium never looks like that. It is more thinly linear with brownish tints as it ages.

What are you using to seal your plate edges? It looks like scotch tape. A better and cheaper petri seal is a roll of good quality plastic cling wrap (e.g. Glad) cut into 2 inch minirolls. Stretched over the petri dish edge gives a good seal and allows some gas diffusion for mycelial respiration.

Cubensis contamination is very common and widespread and it calls into question the integrity and stability of the many strains of cubensis on the market. If someone growing strain X gets contaminated by strain Y, who would know?




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