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Men hallucinate after eating fish


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#1 MurCurY

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 09:39 PM

http://www.practical...em.php?news=911

#2 shadyfigure

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 11:54 PM

One of the men, a 40-year old, was admitted to hospital suffering from a digestive problem and terrifying visual and auditory hallucinations, which took 36 hours to disappear. The second man, a 90-year old, suffered from auditory hallucinations a couple of hours after eating the same species of fish, followed by a series of nightmares over the next two nights.


wild

#3 grimblegrumble

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 12:37 AM

Hallucinatory Fish Poisoning

Certain reef fish of the tropical Pacific and Indian oceans carry heat-stable toxins in their head parts, brain, and spinal cords, and (to a lesser degree) in their muscles, or flesh. Typical species include surgeonfish, goatfish, mullets, sergeants major, damselfish, and rudderfish. The toxicity of the fish can vary with the season.

Symptoms occur within 90 minutes of ingestion, and include dizziness, numbness, and tingling around the mouth and lips, sweating, weakness, incoordination, auditory and visual hallucinations, nightmares, shortness of breath, brief paralysis, and sore throat. People do not die from this affliction. Treatment is supportive. The victim should be observed closely to see that he does not injure himself by exercising bad judgment.



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#4 grimblegrumble

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 12:56 AM

Never mind the water; watch for bad mullet
A biologist runs afoul of a strange species with a most peculiar aftertaste
By Taylor Wilson

Bad mullet?
Heck, I thought that harked back to a bad-hair day in the 1980s. But recently University of Mississippi professor Glenn Parsons assured me that wasn't the case.
In his soon-to-be-published book "Sharks, Skates and Rays of the Gulf of Mexico: A Field Guide," he relates an interesting experience that perhaps only anglers and marine biologists could appreciate:

As a research biologist specializing in sharks, he has spent countless hours "soaking bait" in the waters of the Gulf of Mexico.
He frequently used mullet for bait because it was cheap and, "If Neptune did not smile upon you that day, you could always have it for supper."
On one particular day he returned home with no shark captures and a lot of untouched bait to show for it.

"Late that evening, after cleaning up, I sat down to a sumptuous plate of fried mullet. I turned in at about 10 p.m., and as soon as my head hit the pillow, despite the fact that I was dog tired, my mind raced over the events of the day," Parsons said.
And it was quite an eventful day. There was the school of whale sharks that had almost capsized the boat, the pelican that spoke perfect German and who selfishly drank his last Sprite and the band of angels that played Hank Williams tunes on their harps while flying around a nearby shrimp boat.

Jumping out of bed and turning on the lights, Parsons discovered his sheets and pajamas were soaked in sweat.

"I shrugged it off as a very vivid nightmare, moved to the living room where it was cooler and lay down on the couch. As soon as I closed my eyes my mind raced out of control. I was caught up in a cyclone of strange emotions and then the hallucinations began again," he said.
There were scarlet monkeys, sharks swimming through fountains of orange light, multicolored lightning bolts flashing across the room. This continued for the entire night.

"Most of the hallucinations I have no memory of. At the worst part of the incident I was close to calling someone to drive me — and my pet unicorn — to the emergency room," Parsons said.
"The visions finally subsided in the wee hours of the morning leaving me completely exhausted and terribly frightened. Concerned that I would be branded a lunatic and quite frankly afraid that they might be correct, I told no one of this incident.

"The next evening I was afraid to go to bed for fear that the visions would return. Fortunately, they did not."

Over time, Parsons' memory of the "mullet experience" faded, and he said it would be almost a year before he discovered the cause of his presumed brush with insanity.

"While perusing an obscure publication called The Journal of Tropical Medicine, I happened upon an article entitled 'Hallucinatory Mullet Poisoning.' It was one of those, 'Eureka!' moments," he said.

The symptoms described were exactly as those Parsons had experienced.
He said most cases of the poisoning are reported from the tropics, where it is extremely rare. It is practically unheard of in the United States. The symptoms, which develop in 5 to 90 minutes, include sweating, weakness, hallucinations and/or vivid nightmares. One species of Hawaiian fish is even called the "nightmare fish" because it is more likely to contain the hallucinogenic toxin.

"You can imagine my relief to discover that I had not lost my mind, and I was able to tell my friends about the experience," Parsons said.

"One of my more 'liberal minded' friends — I think we all know the type — asked me why I didn't just enjoy the experience. I responded that maybe I could have looked upon it more objectively if I had known the cause of this 'altered consciousness.'

"I asked him how he would feel if he suddenly began to hallucinate for no apparent reason? I also explained that watching snakes crawling across the ceiling of my bedroom was not my idea of fun."

Parsons said two things stayed with him from the experience:

"One was an anxiety about eating mullet that lasted for several years. The other was some small appreciation for what it must be like to lose one's mind. I dearly cherish my sanity, almost as much as my pet unicorn."


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#5 Hippie3

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 08:08 AM

hmm, where can i score some mullet ???

#6 SharkieJones

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 11:23 AM

A syringe of mullet toxin anyone?

#7 MsShroom

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 11:27 AM

Maybe it was stuffed with Miracle-Gro like the snake! lol :teeth:

#8 terrorcichlid

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 11:36 AM

whats that dude who got busted a long time ago and he has the mr. yuk as his website background. I saw those fish heads for sale on his site last week. I've been looking for a while and can't remember what his site was called.

#9 shimmy

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 11:59 AM

lol would anyone here eat one of those fish to go for a ride sounds like those guys went on a good one i might just head to the fish store

#10 Beast

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 12:01 PM

"One of my more 'liberal minded' friends — I think we all know the type — asked me why I didn't just enjoy the experience. I responded that maybe I could have looked upon it more objectively if I had known the cause of this 'altered consciousness.'


LOL, probably what everyone on this site had run through their head while reading that...

/me gets out the fishing tackle...

#11 rocketman

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 01:07 PM

the mystery of our attraction to females lessens. wonder if they make a mullet perfume?

#12 Soliver1

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 02:31 PM

whats that dude who got busted a long time ago and he has the mr. yuk as his website background. I saw those fish heads for sale on his site last week. I've been looking for a while and can't remember what his site was called.


That was the poisonous non-consumables site . . . interesting stuff there,
most of his shit was real poison.

Strange how he got busted - he was so careful to point out that
none of his products were for human consumption.

I think his dabbling in RC's is what finally got the fed's interest.

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#13 hogwild

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 03:29 PM

Ive killed a mullet with a rock before, caveman style at this lagoon near the area. I should have cooked that sucker up and tripped out.

#14 skullfarmer

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 05:10 PM

i cant believe one of our psychedelic scientist/chemist ,in the know, hasnt found out the chemical culprit. i've been hearing stories about people trippin on fish since the mid 90's.

#15 Spark

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 11:09 PM

Two men have suffered terrifying visual and auditory hallucinations after eating a popular local seafish in Mediterranean restaurants.

According to a clinical study on the patients, which is due to be published in the journal Clinical Toxicology, the men started seeing and hearing things after contracting a rare form of hallucinogenic poisoning from the Salema fish they were dining on.

The species is a popular food fish and is not normally hallucinogenic.

Ichthyoallyeinotoxism, or hallucinogenic fish poisoning, is caused by eating the heads or body parts of certain species of herbivorous fish and has previously only been recorded from the Indo Pacific.

The effects of eating ichthyoallyeinotoxic fishes, such as certain mullet, goatfish, tangs, damsels and rabbitfish, are believed to be similar to LSD, and may include vivid and terrifying auditory and visual hallucinations. This has given rise to the collective common name for ichthyoallyeinotoxic fishes of "dream fish".

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#16 siam_jim

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 11:25 PM

one thing that concern me tho. what was the concentration of this toxin? AND would a higher dose put one 10 feet under or just stoned out of their mind???
peace
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#17 reefer

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 11:42 AM

In my tanks at work i've got a foxfaced rabbitfish, seargent major damsels, and some tangs too. Never thought about eating them before.
:rasta:

I've always wondered if there are psychedelic corals too. Whenever I touch my cat's eyes coral my fingers go numb and I get this "swishy" feeling in my hand. It feels kinda like a body trip high but localized in my hand. Most corals have some kind of defense toxin...

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#18 srgtm1a

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 11:54 AM

hmm, where can i score some mullet ???



:lol: I got some double dipped mullet yo

#19 beardedlady

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 09:40 PM

In my tanks at work i've got a foxfaced rabbitfish, seargent major damsels, and some tangs too. Never thought about eating them before.
:rasta:

I've always wondered if there are psychedelic corals too. Whenever I touch my cat's eyes coral my fingers go numb and I get this "swishy" feeling in my hand. It feels kinda like a body trip high but localized in my hand. Most corals have some kind of defense toxin...


Sorry to bring up an old topic, but I saw this, and it's got me really curious!

As reefer pointed out, almost all of the fish listed as containing this toxin are available in the aquarium trade for ornamental use.

Has anymore research been done on this that anyone is aware of? It'd be kind of messed up to eat a $90 Powder Blue Tang (what they run for in my area at a 3-4" size), but maybe a bunch of smaller damsels would do the trick too.

As far as corals are concerned, most of them are highly toxic. Like...kill you toxic. I'm sure reefer has heard stories of people touching Zooanthids or Palythoa with cuts on their hands, and having to be rushed to the hospital.

A gentleman in the DC area was fighting a flatworm infection, a species that preys on Zooanthids (button polyps), and saw one of the flatworms on the front glass of the tank. He used his finger to squish it to the glass. Some 10 seconds later he felt a rush of blood, and was feeling as if he would pass out. Smart-like (us saltwater enthusiats generally are), he told his co-worker that he needed to be rushed to the hospital before he actually passed out.

He was admitted with a very fluctuating blood pressure, and a very difficult time breathing.

Eventually he worked out of it, I think the story goes that he was in the hospital for a day or two.

The toxin was palytoxin, and was used in the Phillipines to hunt panthers or something large like that. The natives would coat a dart or speartip in the mucus produced by harming the coral, and it can kill a man in several minutes, and if not...make it very difficult for him to get away.

The LD50 is < 100ng/kg in mice. All of this information was pulled off http://www.cbwinfo.c.../Palytoxin.html for those curious.

I couldn't find the story and pictures of the dude with palytoxin poisoning mentioned in my story, as reefcentral's search mode is down at the moment, and I couldn't get any google hits.

Other coral stings, I don't know much about. Generally it is just numbing, as it's a stinging cell (neomcyst?). Most corals don't effect people really (it's suprising that reefer can feel the numbing sensation). Corals that I am aware of that have numbed people I know or myself are would be hammer coral, anchor coral, or anything in that genus, anemones, and the fire coral (atlantic...good luck getting it).

I've never been stung by fire coral, but supposedly it is one of the most horrible experiences of your life if it happens.

One of the speakers at MACNA last year told a story of scuba diving, and there was a toilet underwater that had fallen from a shipwreck, and it was coated in fire coral. People would think it funny to go and sit on this particular toilet, until their skin reacted to the neomcyst from the fire coral, and then it wasn't funny anymore. And then of course, if you touch the stinged location, or rub it, it just transfers the pain to all locations that you touch after that. What a fun time!

Sorry for all the typing and what not, corals/saltwater are one of the few passions I have, and I got excited about the topic.

#20 reefer

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 11:53 PM

Sorry to bring up an old topic, but I saw this, and it's got me really curious!

Sorry for all the typing and what not, corals/saltwater are one of the few passions I have, and I got excited about the topic.


Its all good man! :rasta:




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