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Livin' in a Tent


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#1 cookiemonsterHUNGRY

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 04:38 PM

New to the forum, have to get some posts and thought of a random question to ask you guys..

I recently moved back to Oregon (California= no bueno)

and bought a cabin tent to live in, in a friends back yard, now since this is a rainy lil town I live in, does anyone have any suggestions for rain/cold proofing a tent that's 14 x 10'?

One idea i had was to get a smaller tent and have that be my "warm station" to sleep in and whatnot, however i do not know how viable that is, will i really be warm in the winter? will i puss out and abandon this quest? A question that dwells.


I now understand and relate to the Stark Motto

Winter is coming.

#2 Irishlion

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 04:43 PM

New to the forum, have to get some posts and thought of a random question to ask you guys..

I recently moved back to Oregon (California= no bueno)

and bought a cabin tent to live in, in a friends back yard, now since this is a rainy lil town I live in, does anyone have any suggestions for rain/cold proofing a tent that's 14 x 10'?

One idea i had was to get a smaller tent and have that be my "warm station" to sleep in and whatnot, however i do not know how viable that is, will i really be warm in the winter? will i puss out and abandon this quest? A question that dwells.



I now understand and relate to the Stark Motto

Winter is coming.




put a tarp over it will act like a roof man then your tent will always stay dry.
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#3 SilvrHairDevil

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 05:00 PM

You want to spend the winter living in a tent in Oregon? I admire your courage, at least.

Can you set it up between trees so that you can put an exterior poly tent over it and tie that down with ropes to the trees?

Dank, wet chill will be your major problem, but a good heater will help a lot with that.

What is the plan for cooking, lighting, bathroom, etc? If you only have to sleep there, it becomes much more doable.

#4 Blunted

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 05:03 PM

Take some cordage and the largest tarp you can find or a few tarps and cover as much area around your tent as possible. I'm assuming the structure is pretty sound so you can stretch that tarp real far and low to keep the area around the tent dry. (Don't want your semi-permanent tent sinking into the ground haha) Then use something like straw bails and stack them up against the outside of the tent for added insulation. Also be weary of where you set your tent up, try to pick a spot that isn't going to get flooded. Tarp won't save you if the water just runs under it.


Buying a sleeping bag rated for below zero weather would probably be the best investment you could make. Space heater would be nice to but I don't know how much of a fire hazard that would be not knowing the details. Electric heating blankets are also an option but I have no experience with them

Oh and I know I sound like your Ma but layer your clothing, simplest way to stay warm especially if mobility isn't a factor.

Edited by Blunted, 08 August 2011 - 05:09 PM.


#5 cookiemonsterHUNGRY

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 06:54 PM

http://imageshack.us...8155207.jpg/Hey thanks for all the tips!



I decided to upload a few pictures to give a better idea of what I'm workin with. As you can see in the second photo (well probably not cause it's hard to see) there is a mesh ceiling to the tent, and then a few inches above that is the tarp roof (separate)

okay so last question, as far as when it gets cold here (ma don't worry i'll be wearin layers haha) but as far as when it gets cold, would it be possible to drape some kind of insulating layer on the mesh, below the roof tarp ? (the structure is decently strong)

As far as material goes I was thinking... some kind of thick flannel, and then a windbreaker like material above that, to try to get some insulation. Whuchu think?

Also the landlord said that area doesn't flood, so I thiiiink I should be okay, but still, pretty nervous about it

SilvrHairDevil: Its in a friends backyard so I have access to the kitchen, bathroom and washer/dryer (without those.... i dunno)


Posted Image
Posted Image




Winter is coming.
http://imageshack.us...0808161824.jpg/

#6 tantric hook

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 10:07 PM

... Winter is coming.


Nice looking tent. I think you are good to go. You might want to get your floor level above the ground -- plywood on pallets would do that. At least get a cot. If you can use a small space heater, that would be bonus. Not to keep the tent warm, but just to keep the air enough above the ambient outdoor temperatue so it stays dry inside.

I spent the winter of '70-71 in a tipi near Elmina, in the Oregon coast mountains. I cooked on a fire pit, so the tipi had to have a hole in the top to let the smoke out. That made moisture control a little more tricky.

It was a great experience -- running with the deer in the mornings, gardening in the day light, pickin' blues in the evening. Didn't get much done on the ol' doctoral thesis, however!!

#7 TVCasualty

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 10:15 AM

If the tent is going to stay directly on the ground like that, I'd suggest tucking the blue tarp it's sitting on under the edge of the tent. Having a waterproof layer between the ground and the tent is essential but if it pokes out from under the side of the tent then water will settle on top of it and go right under your tent floor.

Lining the walls with wool blankets (army surplus store) will help keep it nicer inside, as would wrapping the outside with strawbales (covered w/ tarps to keep them dry). Or line the outside of the walls with strawbales and make a suspended ceiling out of wool blankets for the coziest arrangement. You could even line the ground with a thick tarp, add a layer of bales, another tarp, then put the tent up on the bales (best to cover the bales w/ plywood so they compress more evenly). It'd be a bit of work to build that way but if the walls and floor were insulated w/ bales you'd have a very comfortable shelter for the winter. I've lived in a tent and built a few straw bale houses, and in one small 12'X12' cabin I hadn't stuccoed the bales yet and it was about 14 degrees F outside at night but didn't go below 28 inside and the only source of heat was my girlfriend and I (and we were wrapped up in sub-zero sleeping bags!). If we were not in our sleeping bags it would stay above freezing inside.

And get a roll of bailing twine (the poly type, not wire or jute). It's pretty cheap for a few thousand feet worth, is strong, and won't rot. We got a roll of black poly twine so the lines wouldn't stand out but sometimes you can only find the orange stuff. With a bowline, trucker's hitch, clove hitch, and a sheet bend you can do a whole lot of stuff really cheaply (lash saplings to make a larger vestibule or even another room for your tent; we lashed a bunch of poles into a 10' diameter dome we covered w/ a tarp and used as a kitchen).

You can also bunch up the corners of wool blankets or tarps or tent fabric and tie them with a clove hitch for a secure grip that won't tear anything, then run the twine to whatever you're tying the blanket or tarp to and tension it w/ a trucker's hitch (I like those better than taut-line hitches just cause I can tie 'em so fast). We had to do this with a large canvas tarp we used to cover a small trailer we got our second year in the woods so we could have a shower since it allowed us to secure the edge of the tarp in a steep vertical zig-zag pattern so water and snow would shed (well, the water shed ok but the snow needed knocking off every couple hours if it was snowing hard). Before securing the tarp that way we woke up during a rainstorm to find a 100 gallon 'bathtub' forming where it couldn't shed and was it starting to pull our 4X4 posts over so to save the whole structure we bailed with buckets and siphoned it out with a hose while standing on a ladder during the storm at 3am (we only had a headlamp for light, lol. Those were the days...). It was a strong motivator to figure out a better way to do things (to put it mildly). Save yourself the hassle and make sure up front that you don't let any bathtubs form in your tensile structures!

Good luck, and enjoy the adventure!

#8 Gide_Gnome

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 09:07 AM

Put it on pallets is a great idea. Keeps you off any flooding for a while, and also keeps you off of the cold ground. Put some mylar between the pallets and the tent. Emergency ponchos, old pet food bags, whatever. It's a great insulator. I'd also sew some on to the top, or at least velcro it on, if you want it to insulate really well. Heat rises, and that gap has you losing a lot of it :(
Then consider an upgrade to a canvas tent with a wood stove.

#9 dead_diver

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 06:11 PM

You should get a good sleeping bag that is rated for the temps you will see. It's hard to keep a tent warm, it's easier to keep your body warm instead. If you can find one of the newer German army sleeping bags get one. I have one and love it. I've owned a lot of sleeping bags over the years, civilian and military ones, and this is my favorite for the simple reason I can take a piss without having to crawl out of the bag. That's a luxury you will learn to appreciate when it's cold. It is waterproof, I can sleep in a mud puddle and still stay dry and warm. It has sleeves so you can use your hands and arms and the bottom opens so you can stick your feet out and walk around without having to get out of the bag. I found a link for one here that is only $40 NEW! That's better than the deal I got for one used and I thought I was lucky to find one http://www.sportsman...s.aspx?a=565353

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#10 red devil

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 06:30 PM

Man that might get cold. But that tent is cooo. I would love to sit out there and just get smoked. Own little territory, to my self.

owww yaaaa bowwnttt wounnttt cha ga cha ga.

#11 TheObserver

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 03:15 AM

I'm just curious cookiemonsterHUNGRY why you are doing this - living in a tent. Is it out of necessity, circumstance, or just to be rent free? I admire the motivation you have to live in Oregon in a tent. Hey, its an adventure friend. Let's not all be closed-minded to what we haven't personally experienced. I've also thought of living in a tent, but situations change and I have obligations now. But I still love to go back-country camping! Cheers, I am sorry I don't have much advice. Most of the others have covered a good amount of information. I say though a huge tarp over the top and elevating the foundation would be beneficial.

Peace
To

#12 wildedibles

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 05:06 AM

Wow winters almost over how did you do? :)
Someone told me once that they were going to live in a tent up here in Canada for the winter I wanted to move to my moms for the winter that year so I said you can rent my house so they had somewhere to live humm they only paid 2 months rent but they were a little warmer and dryer and no one broke into my house for the winter
wow that's an idea hope you stayed warm and dry




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