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Psilocybe West Virginian specimens....


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#1 Lazlo

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 12:04 AM

These were found growing in Tera Alta, WV. These specimens were found growing on horse manure on trails and a field on private property for hunting deer and turkey. The finders were hunting Morel mushrooms. Each consumed the mushrooms and tripped. They appear to be Ps. Cubensis. What do you think? The specimens are short and thick. The mushrooms were harvested in abundance, around 20-30 of them in a small area. Here's 2 of the specimens they saved for me. Nice guys. Getting a spore print is unlikely so, I snapped a stem for cloning in case the cap doesn't print. I hope to get a print but, they are both very dry. We'll see. Just in case, cloning is back up. http://mycotopia.net...55&d=1146546197

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#2 I_am_me

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 12:34 AM

You could always take a sample of the gill for cloning, thats bound to have spores and you could isolate away from any contams. Looks like cubensis to me but ya never know.

#3 DocOc

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 12:36 AM

Nice work man!

#4 Guest_cap_*

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 01:05 AM

that is really cool.
love the chubby look to em laz. thx for sharin the story with us and the cool pix
im not going to try to ID them they look too much like cubies to me to start second guessing

are you using agar to clean these up?

:eusa_pray keepin my fingers crossed for ya

#5 Lazlo

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 01:54 AM

A sample of tissue was taken from within the stem and applied to MEA for back up. I've rehydrated a cap and am now trying a print. We'll see.

#6 Hippie3

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 07:14 AM

in abundance, around 20-30 of them in a small area


proly found someone's outdoor patch,
way too cold in w.v. for cubies to winter over...

#7 golly

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 07:28 AM

Tera alta is one of the coldest regions in WV. ...very interesting find...hope u can propagate em somehow...

#8 SharkieJones

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 08:07 AM

That's interesting. Please keep us posted.

#9 Guest_dial8_*

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 08:33 AM

Nice find! Looks like cubes to me. :teeth:

#10 Guest_pcsillypj_*

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 10:42 AM

awsome find...:)

#11 Lazlo

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 12:14 PM

I thought the same thing Hippie but, he said they were growing off manure in several spots along a trail and in a field. He said it was chilly and was raining hard the first night they arrived there. The next day they hunted Morel's, finding these as well on a beautiful day.

Anyone ever heard of or seen these being around WV?

#12 TVCasualty

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 02:35 PM

Maybe you are about to have another good cold-temp strain of cubes available...best of luck in your efforts.

It could still possibly be an intentional grow; maybe someone scattered spores or some spawn on the manure they found, or even that P. cubensis, like many non-natives, is adapting and moving into new climate zones. Like fire ants, which are slowly moving north as well.

#13 Lazlo

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 05:37 PM

I somewhat know the owner of the property and am having doubts they were intentionally put there. I wish I had been able to go on the trip.

#14 the_chosen_one

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 05:51 PM

Man, I'm subscribing to this one!!!! Great work Laz!!! Can't wait to see where this takes us.

#15 Hippie3

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 06:54 PM

it's possible the horses were fed grain/straw that had cubie spores on it,
it's possible that someone trespassed to do their grow.
it's not that species are deliberately moving north into new climates,
rather it's that
climate itself is changing,
enabling species to live where they could not in the past.
but i'd still be very skeptical about
cubies native to west virginia.
it's not quite that warm yet.

#16 Bobcat

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 10:56 PM

If they were native to the WV, that would be ballz-to-the-wall awesome! The best cold hardy cub yet!

#17 Lazlo

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 06:23 AM

Our old buddy Karl Finn was a WV'ian. Maybe he'll chime in.:D

#18 TVCasualty

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 11:35 AM

Fire ants are deliberately moving north. Well, I use 'deliberately' kind of loosely here. They are hybridizing with native ants that are cold hardier. Either way, they are definitely moving into areas where they don't have to compete with other fire ant colonies, and that is to the north. Climate change meets them halfway, accelerating the process. Hybridization/evolution coupled with climate change would likely create evolutionary effects that manifest much quicker than would have been previously thought, mainly because the entire biosphere is in an unprecedented situation so science has no benchmark to measure by.

#19 Lazlo

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Posted 17 May 2006 - 09:41 PM

:eusa_whis

#20 Guest_cap_*

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Posted 17 May 2006 - 09:46 PM

what's happnin?! :amazed:




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