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Psilocybe West Virginian specimens....


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#121 Bobcat

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 09:33 PM

Have tried /planning on trying the salt tek on these?

#122 mycot

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 10:41 PM

I noticed a couple of the earlier posts mentioned use of gill fragments for propagation which is a great method of propagation when a print is unavailable.( and even when one is available)
I,m also much suprised at how this method of propagation has been so little mentioned in the OMC.
(Perhaps I should start a separate thread, I suppose I will should I do some more plates soon)

Anyway my methodology (using sterile implements) :-

1) Extract some (cracker-dry) gill fragments using a pair of tweezers to be placed on clean aluminium foil. The foil has been previously folded like a paper plane :lol: in other words a V shape with a crease down the center.

2) Using a scalpel the fragments are further broken up into many smaller fragments and arranged scattered near the tip of the V.
If the above operations were done outside of a glovebox the foil is folded at the crease and transfered transfered to glovebox.

3) Using scalpel brush fragments onto prepared prepared plates. :pirate:

What results is most likely spore germination rather than a clone.
This method is very good in terms of lack of contamination, often showing less contamination than when using the sporeprint. Its also a great method when spores are not germinating prolifically.
I hope to see more experimentation using gill fragments by people, its a much under-utillised and very useful method. :loveeyes:

#123 Lazlo

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 12:14 AM

I'll end up getting something to work with Bobcat.

Mycot. You need mushroom matter in order to use it. I ate them. I'm aware of using gill fragments.

#124 Leary's Ghost

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 12:25 AM

Intelligencer & Wheeling News-Register
Wed, 15 May 2002

ILLEGAL MUSHROOM PICKING LEADS TO ARRESTS
by
John Phillips

.....

"Our biggest concern is the safety of the individuals," Seminsky added. "We don't want them ODing on the mushroom or taking the wrong mushroom and dying.".............


yeah right. thanks for your concearn. i'm sure they will be alot safer doing 1 to 5 in the state pen general population.

#125 Sidestreet

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 09:58 AM

Intelligencer & Wheeling News-Register
Wed, 15 May 2002
ILLEGAL MUSHROOM PICKING LEADS TO ARRESTS

... Kazienko explained that the psilocybin mushroom, when ingested, produces a mild hallucinogenic effect or "buzz." ...


Mild? Guess he never stood naked and shat himself before God, as hippie said once. :crazy1:

#126 Bobcat

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 11:04 AM

I ate them.


:lol: In the name of science, identification and public safety, of course! :lol:

So what were your impressions of them? I've always heard nice and positive reports from outdoor grows.

#127 Lazlo

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 11:47 AM

They were pretty damn good! I liked them a lot. I thought they were rather strong myself.

Well, let's see how these new plates work out. I'm nearly at the point were i'll have to start applying the printing media to agar now. Geeze, I can't find the isolate plates for nothing! I have no clue what I did with them and I have around 100 or so cultures of various species in plates. ATM I have 10 projects of various species going on and i'm about to snap. :eusa_shif

#128 nepenthes_ak

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 01:38 PM

I think its time for some organization!

#129 Lazlo

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Posted 20 February 2007 - 10:04 PM

You're not kidding man.

Ok, looking good finally. I thought I was getting ready to blow it in a major way.

"Lazlo sighs"

#130 bullfrog

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Posted 20 February 2007 - 11:37 PM

we all had faith in ya' ! was there any doubt ? hell no !:eusa_clap

the golden oysters ya' sent are amazing !:bow:


:pirate:

#131 Lazlo

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 12:35 AM

There you are bullfrog.

Between you, this thread, the salt thread, my up and comming baby, my current job, getting my new line of income straight and buying a new home, I thought for sure I was going to have a heart attack. Man, i'm spent!

I need some pills or something. I thought for sure I was going to screw this completely up. That would've been terrible if I did that.

No lies guys. I've been a wreck thinking I was going to completely screw this up. I'd look like the biggest dumby in the world on top of all the other stresses I have.

Well anyways, i'm good here. :) Don't worry, i'll manage.

#132 StroFun

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 08:57 AM

Fuck yeah man keep up the good work!

#133 Bobcat

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 03:10 PM

I'd look like the biggest dumby in the world on top of all the other stresses I have.


Never! Good luck and don't forget to HAVE SOME FUN with it!

#134 nepenthes_ak

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 04:46 PM

We all get stressed out, shit happens!

Don't let it get to you to bad man!



#135 StroFun

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Posted 29 March 2007 - 06:45 AM

Are things going better for you laz?

#136 mikect05

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Posted 08 April 2007 - 10:45 AM

After reading this thread I have some hope that maybe what I have to say wont just be shut down and written off. I wrote about this in another forum and was told it was impossible.

So I am 28yrs old now, but back when I was in highschool I enjoyed eating cubes. I didn't know much then and just went by what I heard so when people told me they grew on horse and cow shit I started searching cow patches near my house in CT. I searched many times over a couple year period. I would go to this old farm and be smoking or checking my plants and while doing so I would look at the cow patties. One day I spotted a mushroom on a old mostly dryed pie. I flipped over the pie with a stick and found some mycelium, and another small mushroom. I of course picked them, and went searching with new hope. I found a couple more, but found a lot of mycelium, so I started gathering all the pies with any mycelium in a garbage bag and layed them all out on a sheet of plyboard in my old barn. Sure enough some mushrooms grew and I picked them and dryed them in the sun on a rock. I went to a camp for CAP for two weeks and when I got back there were slugs everywhere and only some stems left.
They looked exactly like the mushrooms I would buy so I ate a little of them and got some effects so I ate the rest of them and had a strong trip. I moved down to the city and never really thought to much since, until I tryed talking about this in another forum and people told me it was impossibe. Well nothing is impossible, and dust and spores travel all over the world in the jet stream, and besides I know for myself my experience. I just can't wait for summer to go back to those fields and start searching again, and get some evidence. Any way that's my plan and I expect to find something I can document! But that will be a few months away. Wish me luck, and don't hate, or I just may prove you wrong!!:D

#137 Lazlo

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Posted 08 April 2007 - 12:27 PM

After reading this thread I have some hope that maybe what I have to say wont just be shut down and written off. I wrote about this in another forum and was told it was impossible.



Well, tell those who said it was impossible I personally said to stick it up their asses. I get so sick and tired or the negativity some people have to offer without knowing what they're talking about. IMHO, it's absurd to think one can't find tropical species of mushrooms growing in places where there isn't a tropical climate nearly year round. If the conditions are good to find a tropical species for a few months in CT, you definitely have a decent chance at finding these species. Especially when you take into account all of the hands around now that are planting outdoor beds for tropical mushroom cultivation all over the world. Year round tropical climates or not.

Come to find out that there's numerous fellers around the area the W.V. was found that have outdoor cubensis beds going. So it seems to me that their spores have started to drift around the area and are obviously spreading out further from their beds.

Just wait a few years from now when the Ps. cyan starts showing up all over the N.E. when the time's right. :lol:

#138 Sidestreet

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Posted 08 April 2007 - 07:30 PM

Just wait a few years from now when the Ps. cyan starts showing up all over the N.E. when the time's right. :lol:


Oh, man! Stop toying with my emotions! :lol:

#139 TVCasualty

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Posted 09 April 2007 - 09:13 AM

Wasn't sure if I should copy the whole thing here, but it hopefully wasn't too long and I think has relevance to this thread...

from: http://news.bbc.co.u...ure/6524013.stm

A remarkable father-and-son research project has revealed how rising temperatures are affecting fungi in southern England.

Fungus enthusiast Edward Gange amassed 52,000 sightings of mushroom and toadstools during walks around Salisbury over a 50-year period.

Analysis by his son Alan, published in the journal Science, shows some fungi have started to fruit twice a year.

It is among the first studies to show a biological impact of warming in autumn.

"My father was a stonemason, and his hobby was mycology," recounted Alan Gange, an ecology professor at Royal Holloway, University of London.

"For 50 years of his life, he went out and recorded the appearance of mushrooms and toadstools around Salisbury, and he also got his friends in the local natural history group to bring back samples they found when they were out walking.

"When he retired, he bought himself a computer, taught himself (the spreadsheet program) Excel, and typed in all these 52,000 records."

Now Mr Gange senior finds his enthusiasm and diligence rewarded as a named author on a paper in one of the two most eminent scientific journals in the world.

"I'm on top of the world, I can't quite believe it yet," he told the BBC News website.

The records included sightings of 315 species of mushrooms and toadstools which appear in the autumn, being the seasonal fruiting parts of fungi that live in the soil, on rotting wood or in tree roots.

One of the changes Professor Gange turned up was that the autumnal fruiting period has expanded. Some mushrooms and toadstools are emerging earlier each year, others later, which he thinks are responses to warmer temperatures and higher rainfall.

More spectacularly, he found that more than one third of the species recorded have started to fruit twice per year. There was no record of this before 1976; but since then, 120 species have shown an additional fruiting in spring.

"I looked up the data on the average temperature for February in southern England during the 1950s, and it was 3.5C," he said.

"In the current decade it's 5.2C. We used to get cold days and nights in February which caused fungi to be dormant; these days we get very little of that."

In recent years a significant number of studies have found changes in species' behaviour during springtime apparently related to climate change, with growing seasons starting earlier, and young animals born in months which would, in previous years, have been too cold.

This is one of the first studies to show a parallel trend in autumn.

After more than 50 years of observing the natural world, Edward Gange is convinced that the climate is changing - at least within a 30km radius of Salisbury - though he prefers to attribute the warming to natural cycles rather than humanity's production of greenhouse gases.

"When I was a lad, it was an absolutely categorical fact that Red Admirals would not survive the winter," he said.

"This year we saw them on 19 January. That's a heck of a change, and it's not the only one."


"Red Admirals" are Amanita Muscaria, I believe. Life is on the move...

#140 oldiebutnewbie

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 04:52 PM

.... so when people told me they grew on horse and cow shit I started searching cow patches near my house in CT. I searched many times over a couple year period. I would go to this old farm and be smoking or checking my plants and while doing so I would look at the cow patties. One day I spotted a mushroom on a old mostly dryed pie. ... Well nothing is impossible, and dust and spores travel all over the world .... Wish me luck, and don't hate, or I just may prove you wrong!!:D

#############
I have never seen such a place as Ct for 'shrooms of all sorts. Never found Ps. genus but many, many others. Cinnamon chanterelles, Amanitas (not muscaria but the fatal ones), many others. Very hard to preserve however as the air there seems to turn them to ucky glop rather than to dry them properly. Many bugs and insects too.
OBN




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