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1.5 acre micro farm


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#1 Organic joe

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 08:52 AM

Hello everyone,
So I have one and a half acres to start a micro farm with, I've been reading about it and some people have made $60000+ off just a half an acre.
I dont expect too make that much my first or even second year but free food and any kind of profit is worth it to me.

I guess I'm just looking for some feed back on some good cash crops so far I have tomatos, lettuce, and different fresh herbs.
Anyone have any other ideas of what I should grow?

Along with growing produce I'm thinking about starting some honey bee boxes and selling honey as well.
I've read that a person can make up to twenty grand off one hundred bee boxes a year and they only take up a hundred sq. Ft of space.
I don't plan to start out with that many boxes thats to many for a rookie to attempt, I'm thinking ill only start out with five or six my first couple years until I understand what to do and how to do it.

Any questions comments concerns and advice is greatly appreciated and thank you in advance...
I'd really like to talk to a bee farmer if there is any here or any of you amazing people know of any thanks again
Organic joe
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#2 kocos

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 10:20 AM

Firstly Wellcome to Mycotopia Organic Joe! Iam sure you will find most if not all your anwsers here!


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There are tons of vegies that can be grown as cash crops like peppers, cucumbers, cukini etc. You just have to find what grows best in your are and go with that. There are certain plants that grow much better if planted side by side so I would look into these things in detail especially since your going to be working with a limited amount of space.

As for the honey bee's. I would do quite a bit of reading up on this matter too. I actually just started bee keeping a month ago. When I first started considering it and started reading up on the fact I realised it requires a lot more work than one would think. None the less they are a great benifit to the garden and a good source of income by all means.

What I would reccomend is to start small, just a few hives perhaps 5 at the most just to get used to working with bee's.

I wish you good luck and hope you succeed!




#3 LargeMarge

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 02:02 PM

Welcome! we had a 3/4 acre garden for the farm and sold produce as well. We have a lot of Scandinavians so that rules out hot peppers for the most part. We had the biggest demand for Tomatoes and corn. pickling and slicing cucumbers, onions, carrots, bell pepper, green bean and rutabaga all sold very well too.

#4 Sidestreet

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 02:19 PM

I don't want to discourage you, but I think your numbers may be slightly unrealistic.

60,000 for a half-acre sounds extremely high.

Also, in the farming game, there is money to be made, but a farmer friend told me that overhead can be extremely high (and he was using almost all antique equipment).

That said, if you enjoy the work you can definitely make a lifestyle of it. We all need some cash, but a small farmer's objective shouldn't necessarily be money. Think freedom, good health and a fulfilling labor of love.

Edited by Sidestreet, 12 October 2011 - 08:26 AM.
spelling

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#5 SilvrHairDevil

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 02:27 PM

If you are looking long term, I suggest checking out ginseng.

I believe it takes 3 years before the first cash comes in, but after that, it's profitable.

#6 Organic joe

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 05:19 PM

If you are looking long term, I suggest checking out ginseng.
I believe it takes 3 years before the first cash comes in, but after that, it's profitable.





Hi there I checked into ginseng when I first started think about doing this and its ten years for the crop to be ready and china will pay a hundred grand for an acre of ginseng...
But it produced seed yearly and you can make 90 bucks a pound off the seeds
But thank you it was I god idea just to long for the part off
saffron pays good to but you need a lot to make it work

#7 Organic joe

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 05:29 PM

I don't want to discourage you, but I think your numbers may be slightly unrealistic.
60,000 for a half-acre sounds extremely high.
Also, in the farming game, there is money to be made, but a farmer friend told me that overheard can be extremely high (and he was using almost all antique equipment).
That said, if you enjoy the work you can definitely make a lifestyle of it. We all need some cash, but a small farmer's objective shouldn't necessarily be money. Think freedom, good health and a fulfilling labor of love.



I haven't read it all and maybe I understood it wrong but this is what I found on google looking up urban farming I'm not trying to be rude so pleas don't take this the wrong way
But this isn't the same articleI found earlier when I was researching I think the one I found was in philadelphia

PDF] An Overview of Urban Farming Sep 23, 2009 … Brick City Urban Farms —Newark, New Jersey . .... Assuming a plot of land of at least half an acre, a list of … $5000 and $10000 per year for a typical sub-acre farm seeking $60000 in gross revenue. … https://mycotopia.ne...l-farm/download -

#8 Organic joe

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 05:36 PM

Thank you for the welcome and all the comments
Istill have a lot of research to do but I am more than willing to do this garden even if its just for free food and fun hobby....
Kocos and large marge check into certified naturally grown type it into google search it may help you profit more

#9 LargeMarge

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 06:56 PM

I will have to check it out. I am moving soon and will have a much smaller garden but there will be fewer people to feed from it.

#10 SilvrHairDevil

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 07:01 PM

Hi there I checked into ginseng when I first started think about doing this and its ten years for the crop to be ready...



Double check. There's a ginseng farm very near me and they said different.

#11 tantric hook

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 08:02 PM

Garlic can be profitable on a small acreage. You can dry and grind to powder all that you don't sell fresh. Not gonna clear $60,000 a year though! (Do you know how many dirt poor farmers there are out there that would have already jumped all over any such possibility?!)

#12 Organic joe

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 10:29 PM

Double check. There's a ginseng farm very near me and they said different.



Well I guess it depends on the state laws..
Ohio says you can't sell ginseng until its 3 years old and it dont produce seed til its 3yrs old...but it also says you can grow from seed or seedlings that range from 1-3yrs old so yes I guess you can sell it before ten years but it takes longer than that to fully mature here is the site I just found

http://ohioline.osu....-fact/0057.html

#13 Sidestreet

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 08:28 AM

I haven't read it all and maybe I understood it wrong but this is what I found on google looking up urban farming I'm not trying to be rude so pleas don't take this the wrong way
But this isn't the same articleI found earlier when I was researching I think the one I found was in philadelphia

PDF] An Overview of Urban Farming Sep 23, 2009 … Brick City Urban Farms —Newark, New Jersey . .... Assuming a plot of land of at least half an acre, a list of … $5000 and $10000 per year for a typical sub-acre farm seeking $60000 in gross revenue. … https://mycotopia.ne...l-farm/download -



I don't think you're being rude at all; I reserve the right to be wrong! It's all just conversation.

However, that link didn't work for me...


PS The farmer I worked for did well for a few reasons:

A) Besides the farmer's market, he sold only to pricey restaurants.

B) In order to sell to them, he was EXTREMELY discriminating when it came to the quality of the veggies. He also did specialty items and noteworthy varieties like baby arugula, micro greens, edible flowers, heirloom tomatoes, etc.

C) He busted his ass every single day.


PPS I highly recommend Johnny's Selected Seeds for your seed.

Edited by Sidestreet, 12 October 2011 - 08:33 AM.


#14 pharmer

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 08:49 AM

the cited article says 60K in GROSS REVENUE

that's the total of all sales in a year.

you must subtract the cost of fertilzer, seed, labor, taxes, water, etc etc etc etc etc etc etc to determine how much you will profit - which is the number you're interested in after you've fed yourself. This is a very big deal and not something you can get wrong and survive as a businessman.

consider doing a single crop and doing it well. then find the best buyer for the crop. your odds of profiting go up considerably over the choices of roadside stand or taking your stuff to a farmers' market - both are giant time consumers and your time has value too.

I did alot of research when thinking about going into the business of growing hydroponic herbs and selling them exclusively to hotel restaraunts in my area. There was alot of interest from the chefs but they all said they'd need to see an operation up and running before they'd commit to switching from their currrent supplier.

This agri-business stuff ain't as easy as it sounds but it's certainly do-able if you are willing to put the sweat equity into it and take the risks that every other businessman in the world has to take.

I say good luck with it and hope you do well.

#15 Sidestreet

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 08:59 AM

Sweat is what it's all about! If you love the work and you're willing to do a lot of it then it really is the good life.

#16 Organic joe

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 12:56 PM

Sidestreet- thanks for the advice from your past job
a friend and myself are doing this project together we already have one school that said they will buy 600 bucks worth of produce a month thats not much but its a start and besides that I know a guy that has seven stands he goes through a semi load of produce every other day so as long as I can beat his current providers price I think we will do well...

Pharmer- as for fertilizer and water I think I will be ok I get the fertilizer for free just my labor and gas to get it but its only two miles down the road and I have rain barrels to collect water in and awell so I wrong have to pay much for the water just electric to run the pump....taxes and seed well that I still have to figure out but still for just side work 40 grand and all the fresh veggies I can eat sounds worth it to me

#17 Sidestreet

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 02:42 PM

Gotta start somewhere buddy!

Just keep your dream at the front of your mind and put your shoulder to the wheel. Don't give up! :meditate:

#18 Nobody

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 09:42 PM

Hi there I checked into ginseng when I first started think about doing this and its ten years for the crop to be ready and china will pay a hundred grand for an acre of ginseng...


I think you're mistaking "wild simulated" or truly wild ginseng with cultivated 'sang. The roots grow very slowly in the wild and take 10 years to develop into a mature 4 pronged plant which many states require before harvest. Cultivated sang grows much more rapidly due to tilled soil and fertilizers.

Keep in mind that cultivated ginseng brings a much much lower price/pound than wild roots.

Good luck in your venture, that can be a very rewarding way of life if you go about it the right way. I would recommend the book 'Guide to Self-Sustainability' from John Seymour, it's a very concise and helpful guide for the homesteader.

#19 caitojones

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 12:05 PM

I got fucked out of a 3+ acre property at the last minute, and I had all the logistical estimates worked out. 60,000 does seem pretty high, but it may be doable if you fully utilize the space and have good marketing (selling to restaurants and high-class farmers markets.) I would say just make sure you grow permaculturally, not agriculturally. Interweave compatible crops to maximize root and above-ground space, and recycle any plant waste with mushrooms or with compost to put back into the plant substrate.

#20 kcmoxtractor

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 02:08 PM

microgreens are really where its at...
if you can devote a whole room to em inside,
you can make a killing off of just that room

every time i start a new thread/project, someone else gets the same idea
ain't shared (un)consciousness great? :D




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