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Inonotus obliquus ( Chaga mushroom )


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#1 wildedibles

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 10:45 AM

I went out hunting for this mushroom yesterday and found 3 small mushrooms,
there are 2 more that I found too but I left them there for now.
Me and hubby used a small hatchet to remove them from the Birch trees,
taking the opportunity to show my oldest son how to use a hatchet safely.

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These are the 3 we collected

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I put 1 piece in the crock pot over night on warm I will wait till the water is reduced by half and put it in a mason jar in the fridge, and repeat 2 more times after that the tea is to week. I will mix them all together to make a more standardized dose.
I used this mushroom last winter to help with my chronic back pain, it did work some and something is better than nothing :)
I used about a quarter cup mixed with my coffee in the morning. The taste goes well with coffee kinda chocolaty coffee taste yummy :) for something that looks non edible.
Here is a link to Wikipedia on Inonotus obliquus ( Chaga Mushroom )
http://en.wikipedia....onotus_obliquus

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Edited by wildedibles, 13 November 2011 - 11:00 AM.

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#2 Alan Rockefeller

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 11:26 AM

Birch tree chaga is good. Cherry tree "chaga" is toxic.
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#3 wildedibles

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 11:38 AM

Thanks for letting me know, I know Cherry bark contains toxin's but I was wondering about the growths on the cherry trees, they weep this clear goo in the fall when it is wet.
The tea was reduced by half in the crock pot on warm a day and a half in, so starting round two soon :)

#4 SilvrHairDevil

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 01:57 PM

I think cherry tree "chaga" isn't really chaga - it's known as Black knot Infection.

http://en.wikipedia....Prunus_serotina

I’ve read that chagas grow on only one in 15 – 18 thousand birch trees. Are you finding enough of them to make them a regular part of your diet?





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#5 Alan Rockefeller

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 03:37 PM

I know Cherry bark contains toxin's


I don't think it does.

The clear goo is sap.
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#6 wildedibles

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 04:06 PM

This is Prunus serotina from Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia....Prunus_serotina
"The foliage, particularly when wilted, contains cyanogenic glycosides, which convert to hydrogen cyanide if eaten by animals.[4]"

The seeds and the green bark also contain similar substances, you can make a cough syrup out of the bark but there is warnings about cyanide in the books I have read.
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#7 Alan Rockefeller

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 05:55 PM

Thanks.

The chaga-like mushroom that grows on cherry is also toxic on its own.
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#8 wildedibles

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 06:47 PM

Is it found on any other trees Alan Rockefeller ?
SilvrHairDevil Last Year I collected enough for the winter, this summer I was looking for other ones, I think I will have enough for this winter.
The ones I found are near each other I would say all within the same mile. There are many Birch trees in this area and it is a spot honey mushrooms are too. Some of the chaga are on half dead trees some of the trees are still in great shape.
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#9 wildedibles

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 08:45 AM

We went out hunting yesterday and found some more chaga. When I found a tree that had chaga on it I looked around and found other trees in the area with knots or growths similar to chaga. I found the cherry growth, some on maple and some on a Balsam tree that I have not noticed until yesterday. It got me thinking is it a similar fungi creating these in different trees? They were all very close and 20' radius or so all the trees in that area were affected.
Below showing Maple, Maple and Cherry Trees
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Maple, Birch and Birch
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Birch and Cherry with the goo :)
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The battery was dead in the camera so I didn't get a pic of the Balsam tree but I took a sample home and I will add pictures later for it.
Here is a link to wikipedia on Burl's of trees they are caused by many factors including fungi for one. The picture of the Birch in the link looks like chaga.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burl

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Edited by wildedibles, 16 November 2011 - 09:21 AM.

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#10 Alan Rockefeller

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 02:17 PM

Is it found on any other trees Alan Rockefeller ?


Apiosporina morbosa will grow on anything in Prunus. http://en.wikipedia....us<br /><br />The goo you see on trees is sap. It leaks out when bugs make holes in the bark.
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#11 wildedibles

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 03:45 PM

Thank you for your help :) Allan.
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#12 ethnobotanica

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 04:08 PM

Awesome finds.:) I'd love to find some chaga, I know where there's a load of birch..I'm looking up next time I'm in the woods.;)
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#13 wildedibles

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 04:12 PM

It's easier to find this time of year when the leaves have dropped. My hubby wildberries has had some relief from his knee pain too.

#14 wildedibles

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 08:15 AM

I went out hunting this mushroom again yesterday but forgot the hatchet oops ...
We found one and had no way of taking it home I was pretty grumpy grrr
then we found another one closer to a spot where we could find a rock so hubby got a nice rock with a chisled end and was able to remove it from the tree :)
So when I got home it went into the crock pot on warm almost full of water and it reduced a bit by morning and I was able to have this yummy stuff in my coffee this morning :)

I found that I wasnt sick last year at all threw winter drinking this with my coffee I had no flu shot either I think it is a huge immune system booster ... I have felt kinda sick reciently sinus issues so I really wanted to start drinking this tea again :)
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#15 wildedibles

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 04:10 PM

I remembered the hatchet today and found lots more have enough for the winter now if not it is easy to find in the winter just hard to walk in the snow but fun lol

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and this is the one that is growing on a Balsam tree that i was talking about up there ^ somewhere :)


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#16 Skywatcher

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 04:53 PM

Thank you once again Wilde for you ongoing dedication to sharing your knowledge, and educating others on the vast potential of natural plants and fungi to be used as herbal remedy's and medicinals. With your talents as a photographer and herbalist, I would be the first in line to buy your book, should you ever decide to compile all this into a field guide of natures bounty.
:bow:
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#17 wildedibles

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 05:54 PM

:) Thank you very much bud thoes words mean alot :)
I love sharing my knowledge that I have learned with all here to help contribute back for what I have learned here If I do ever write a book or sell anything I would love to be a sponcer here to help that way too ;)
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#18 wildedibles

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 03:07 PM

One thing I keep forgetting to mention I have been testing to see if this mushroom helps with riding animals of intestinal parasites ( worms ) and it has been working

I take the used chaga mushroom out of the water mix after it is a weak tea and instead of just throwing it in the garbage I put it in the animals water dish and keep it in there for a while month or so it doesnt mold at all

I miss this flavor in my coffee all summer I do not drink this tea to give my system a break

I want to experiment with this mushroom tea more ....

#19 wildedibles

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 08:12 AM

I thought it was funny lately I had a house guest they are gone now but they kept taking this mushroom out of the animal water and into the garbage LOL ya it is weird sitting in the water dish everyone seeing it for the first time wants to take it out
yeck there is something in the animals water dish :) and the conversation of wild mushrooms pops up ;)

I think it is really funny when I tell people I am studying wild mushrooms they tell me right away interrupting me lol
"BE CAREFUL" they say lol
I tell them I am studying with the smartest people around that know their mushrooms
the 2nd thing they ask :) "any magics around :)"

gota love people ;)
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#20 concretefeet

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 02:32 PM

most of the tissues of cherry contain cyanogenic glycosides. They are not directly toxic - at least not below certain levels commonly ingested - [amygdalin is present in substantial quantities in many food/drink items world-wide], but are readily decomposed into toxic cyanide compounds by enzymatic action. It has been theorized that amygdalin could form dangerous compounds in the lower bowel of people with certain GI organisms. I don't know that any case histories have bourne this out.

Edited by concretefeet, 20 December 2012 - 02:44 PM.

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