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#21 MurCurY

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 10:16 AM

So...the guy is coming to hook it up finally this week. All my wood is free. Where I work and love...they cut and split couple dozen cord a year. While I understand gas and labor are expensive....its nothing out of packet for me.

#22 Freakshowchicago

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 11:07 AM

Very intrestring post ... Full of pros and cons re: wood burning .
I get a lot of crap from people around here (chicagoland) for haveing a wood stove in my shop. They claim it's bad for the enviorment and not safe ?
We are a "forest" city (they claim) and each year there are dosen's of trees that are removed and replaced by the city .
Here's my point ,if wood comes from a city cut (or some other source) then it needs to be disposed of... If it's not burned then the city will blow more fossil fuels transporting and chipping etc. Humans need heat to survive ,why not use what is already there ? Long story short ,is about caring for Your local enviorment as well as the global one ! If you run a wood stove ,maybe think about offsetting your emmissions with some other act .

#23 GadgetGuy

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 09:49 PM

That's actually a very efficient wood stove. I used to sell/install them. At it's age it should have 3-5 tubes running through the top of the firebox with a bunch of holes drilled in them. It works like a catalytic converter in a car. There is a chamber that brings fresh air in through the tubes that allows the stove to "re-burn" the gas that is emitted from the initial stage of combustion. Long story short this stove will burn about half the wood, put out half or so of the harmful emissions, and put out the same or a little more heat than those huge metal incinerators they called woodstoves 20+ years ago. Good find, you will be happy as could be.

#24 dead head jed

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 09:28 PM

i really like the idea of getting off the grid, and heating is one of the major obstacles when it comes to those cold months
i've been looking into rocket mass heaters

http://www.richsoil....mass-heater.jsp

anybody got any experience/thoughts?

i've been wondering if it would be possible to combine the mass heater idea with a solar water heater
so instead of using wood to heat, the sun would heat water pipes, which would in turn snake through a cob bench which would act like a heat store
  • Erkee likes this

#25 dpwishy

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 09:34 AM

I could use some help. I am using my stove really inefficiently and I am starting to realize it. I can tell just by common sense that I should not being burning wood so fast, and that the damper is obviously there for a reason. I have always kept the damper fully open, and I have been killing wood!

Let me explain the type of stove I have....

after.jpg

Its one of the old school stoves.
Both sides open up like an accordion to a full fireplace.
There is a damper in the pipe a few feet above the stove.
But there is also one in the stove itself,
on the very top of the inside in the box,
before it meets the pipe.

On each door also,
there are little sliding squares,
This allows air into the box.

For a long time I have been keeping both dampers open fully, and just controlling the air intake by the two squares in the front of the fireplace. I am starting to realize those dampers are there for a reason. After I get a good set of coals going, should I be closing the damper on the inside of the box, or in the up-pipe or both? I am afraid of smoke coming back, these stoves are not as air tight as the other new ones. This is a 70's/80's era stove. Common sense tells me to close it off at the inside box, but leave the damper on the pipe open to get smoke out. but I have never had experience with a wood stove, other than what I have done on my own recently. I could really use some help. I am burning a lot of wood and I know its from inexperience.....

Thanks....

In divine friendship,
your brother,
-wishy

#26 Myc

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 10:12 AM

I haven't back-tracked your entire thread but been reading your latest questions.

All those dampers do make a difference.

You need to have a thermometer (rated for use with fireplaces) installed in the pipe above your stove. This will help you to monitor optimal burn conditions. There is a point where the fire is too cool (and therefore smoky) and there is a point where the fire is too hot (excess creosote deposits can catch fire withing the flu). These little thermometers are cheapo and easily installed with your know-how and tools.

Now for the setup.
My woodstove has two dampers - combustion air and exhaust
When I start a fire - I open both dampers all the way
As the fire matures and gets hotter - I begin to choke back the exhaust damper - keeping the flu temperature as close to optimal as possible. At the same time, you'll want to choke the intake by small degrees keeping an eye on the combustion temperature in the flu.

I went and read more carefully
The damper in the pipe - highest up - open all the way when in use - close when not in use
The damper between the pipe and stove is the "exhaust" I describe
The sliders or squares in the door are the "intake"

Edited by Myc, 12 January 2012 - 10:21 AM.


#27 Myc

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 10:42 AM

http://www.wikihow.c...put<br /><br />I stumbled onto this article
Also did some back-tracking - the "green" unseasoned wood you have will create monster problems for you.
Green wood causes a tar-like buildup in your chimney which doesn't brush away like the chunky, dusty stuff. Try to find some dry wood and leave the green stuff for next year. Avoid ruining your new setup.

#28 dpwishy

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 03:17 PM

http://www.wikihow.c...put<br /><br />I stumbled onto this article
Also did some back-tracking - the "green" unseasoned wood you have will create monster problems for you.
Green wood causes a tar-like buildup in your chimney which doesn't brush away like the chunky, dusty stuff. Try to find some dry wood and leave the green stuff for next year. Avoid ruining your new setup.


Thanks for the advice. My wood isn't completely green. The tree's were fallen about 2-3 years ago, but they were never chopped until about 5-6 months ago. I live in a deciduous rainforest, although it gets very hot in the summers, its also very humid. It is common for people around here to send there wood to a kiln, or buy kiln dried wood. As a true seasoning in this area is around 18 months.

My wood isn't completely green, but it also isn't completely seasoned. The method I stated above about stacking wood on the sides, I don't see how that's any different than kiln dried wood. I have read that the real problem with burning green wood is, the burning temp is much lower due to wet wood on the fire. This causes a build up in the chimney because the smoke rising never gets hot enough to burn it away itself. Therefor, after a good amount of time, the build up is enough to sustain a fire that can burn through the metal. If you are drying the logs on the inside on the sides, and not putting them on the fire directly until dry, the burning temp in there stays high and I don't see an issue with build up. I have a chimney brush and plan on cleaning a few times this burn season, but I haven't seen any issue, and I have been looking for one because I have also read it could be a problem.

Thanks again for all the info,
and how to use the dampers correctly.

In divine friendship,
your brother,
-wishy

#29 Erkee

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 06:01 PM

DANGER the following post contradicts common wisdom, lore, etc for wood burning, is dangerous unless you have the actual experience, and causes conniptions in many folk. lol

it's not easy burning green.

i burn wet wood for a few reasons:
- the stove i have is too big for the space i'm presently heating,
- i don't have a rocket stove or a russian three bell masonary stove yet so i'm augmenting this old airtight clunkers' low heat extraction efficiency until i do.
- wet wood moderates burn rate. in a small space this will keep you from overheating while keeping the burn rate low.
- wet wood releases.. water which has a high heat capacity and is a very efficient heat transfer medium, thereby transfer rate to stove walls and chimney is higher (google "inject water" "flue gas" to see what's done in some large burners)
- slow fire means slow gas movement, and the longer the hot gases have to make heat exchange with surfaces of the fire box and chimney pipe the better.
- slow fire requires less air draw (through cracks and windows?, or a piped air supply?) and therefor less heat is lost mixing fresh cold air from outside
- otoh, a hot fire draws much cold air, and gases move too quickly for efficient heat exchange (perfect if you want to launch a hot air balloon from your house though. lol) and may actually cool a house overall!
- so although the combustion efficiency of burning wet wood is lower, the overall extraction efficiency is higher and therefor less wood is used to heat the place

big problem is buildup of creosote and burnable tars on the inside of your stove and chimney.

ever seen a chimney fire? danger danger, very hot.

remedy?

regularly clean at least the first section of pipe often and check higher up for buildup as well.
each time the ash buildup needs addressing, it's time also to clean the pipe. (experience may say every other time..)
the first pipe section above the stove body gets most of the condensed creosote buildup because it most rapidly cools the flue gases.

hopefully you can choose a nice warm day, remove that first section of pipe to outdoors, stuff it with crumpled news paper, light one end to burn it out, when the creosote ignites you will see inside a rocket stove. :-)

Edited by Erkee, 12 January 2012 - 06:12 PM.


#30 dpwishy

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Posted 13 January 2012 - 08:37 AM

Has anyone tried cooking with theirs? I think I am going to try and make homemade corn chowder on the wood stove today. Ill let you know how it comes out...

In divine friendship,
your brother,
-wishy

#31 Myc

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Posted 13 January 2012 - 09:51 AM

Cast-iron cookware is the bomb.
I have a dutch oven. Put a pot roast in with some potatoes and carrots and other veggies. Cover that with a nice bottle of wine and allow to cook on the stove all day.

Never made bread or anything like that.

#32 knowninvisibilities

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Posted 13 January 2012 - 11:19 AM

Dont know if anyone mentioned the rocket stove, but yea, the rocket stove

http://www.google.co...fOuKyKAg&zoom=1

http://www.permies.c...s/list/120/1078

there's a few links, c&p them, the design is the shit, I plan on making one when I build my own place, even was thinking of using it as a heat source for some pressure cookin

#33 dead head jed

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 12:54 AM

i really like the idea of getting off the grid, and heating is one of the major obstacles when it comes to those cold months
i've been looking into rocket mass heaters

http://www.richsoil....mass-heater.jsp

anybody got any experience/thoughts?

i've been wondering if it would be possible to combine the mass heater idea with a solar water heater
so instead of using wood to heat, the sun would heat water pipes, which would in turn snake through a cob bench which would act like a heat store


mmm hmmmm

#34 the_chosen_one

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 10:35 AM

ever seen a chimney fire? danger danger, very hot.


just wanted to mention.. if you get one it can be put out by throwing wet towels into the stove. the steam will put out the fire.. however you will have a small mushroom cloud coming out of your chimney when you open the stove door lol.

lots of good info here. dampering is important on large pipe high btu stoves... and the one thing i don't see here (maybe i missed it) is the mention of a creosote sweeping log. these make cleaning a heck of a lot easier imo. oh also outside air kits are available for some stoves. these also help the humidity ;)

i'm stuck at home with a snow day today and loving mine!

stay warm :hippie:




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