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New strain of Ps. Mexicana from Eastern slope of Chicon Nindo in Huatla de Jimenez


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#41 wildedibles

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 12:49 PM

WOW

#42 teonanacatl

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 01:46 PM

The fruiting-media formula for the pics elf posted--which I took this morning, is a combination of roughly 4 parts rye grass seed:2 parts organic rye grain:1 part steel cut oatmeal plus a tablespoon or so of wheat and/or rye bran plus supplemental gypsum. I soaked everything together overnight, excepting the rye/wheat bran and gypsum, was added after thoroughly rinsing the grain mixture. The logic for providing a mixed-fruiting medium was to give the wild genetics a broad array of nutritional support for genetic expression in lieu of it´s own ´wild-´genetic diversity. That is, by providing a broad array of nutritional support you improve the chances of providing the mushroom with what it needs for genetic-expression.

What is really interesting about all of this to me, is the difference in fruiting between the very exact same agar culture, innoculated onto precisely the same fruiting substrate using the exact same casing protocol (pasteurized peat moss/CaCO3) and only varying the light source.

Under fluoro they came up like this:

cn-mex.jpg

Under the 453-actinic-blue LED, using this set-up:

setup.jpg

gave these results:

cn-mex2.jpg

Given the controls, we can safely assume that the difference observed in fruiting can be attributed to the LEDs rec´d by anne halonium via elfstone. I can´t thank you all enough, these are some HAPPY fungi! Makes your heart sing, doesn´t it!

Teo

Edited by teonanacatl, 06 April 2012 - 02:07 PM.

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#43 teonanacatl

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 01:53 PM

I also wanted mention that these were definitely not grown via cloning. From the wild prints, I did heavy multi-spore innoculation. Since the original wild prints were taken under non-asceptic conditions, it took several generations of agar work to properly clean up and acclimate the mycellium to MEA (fungi perfecti brand, my fav). Once healthy sections were isolated, I innoculated the grain using liquid mycellium spun outta the eberbach. I am not a big fan of cloning in that you drastically reduce the diversity of the gene pool in subsequent generations, and we have seen several precious strains and species senesce over the years; I speculate that this senescence is the result of cloning. As you can tell from the pictures above, cloning is not necessary to get really solid results. By effectively manipulating the fruiting perameters, you can get incredible results while maintaining the genetic diveristy of the species and/or strain, keeping the strain vital for years and years.

#44 anne halonium

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 01:56 PM

interesting ,
im gonna try firing up this strain,
with the exact same methods as my "annie p mexicana " thread.

im gonna incorporate them in that thread,
right behind the standard p mexicanas.

opening shot, will be 24 fert agar 250 ml polycarbs.

and ,there is gonna be clones, several.
and ,agar by the liter.............

about 1x a yr or so, i do a wild west MS ,
and, take multi spores for diff strains for a diversity bank.
generally i only use clones for a 1 off anyway.
i just generate new cloned strains as needed.
real winners, ill bank the first round under agar and mineral oil at 38 degrees.


im really excited about this novel strain.
alot of possiblities.......

Edited by anne halonium, 06 April 2012 - 02:18 PM.


#45 teonanacatl

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 02:18 PM

I don´t think cloning is ´bad´ per se, lord knows I have done plenty of it myself. With cubensis, I think it can actually be desirable in so far as ´efficiency´ is concerned; you develop a particular clone that yields well for your particular circumstance. I have been growing mexicana for awhile now, and actually get my best fruiting results using multispore. I think when you are making prints for distribution, doing the ocassional multi-spore is good b/c you get all the genetic diversity out there for years to come. Over the years, I have noticed mutations arise in previously virile strains, and it is always a bit of a bummer. Recently, the a-strain of mexicana has been observed to be senescing a bit (by a friend). I would def. like to see this particular Chicon Nindo-strain of mexicana (given the mazatec name for the elven-deity said to reside within the mountain upon which I harvested the original spores) remain vital for years to come, they are just so marvelous to eat ... potent and clean and friendly. Plus, it was quite an effort to seek them out in huautla, get them back to the states, and I spent a good 6 months in the lab before they finally fruited.

I am glad to see this one getting out into the hands of competent cultivators, really makes me happy. Ps. mexicana (pajaritos as the Mazatec call them) is my most beloved species of mushroom; so to find a strain of mexicana growing within eyeshot of the cerro de adoracion (a holy pilgrimage-site in the Mazatec tradition), and not 200 yards away from Maria Sabina´s house ... was like finding the Holy Grail for me. Enjoy everyone, and take good care of her! Muchas benevidas and luv ...

Teo
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#46 anne halonium

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 02:25 PM

i know,
its real excitement.
decades of cubism, was making me yawn.

i can appreciate the significance ,
and trials ,of the,
"from hunt to lab to canopy"

the distance of discovery,
from such an iconic holy site,
makes them IMO , extra divine.

im rather certain, this strain will become a classic.


#47 teonanacatl

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 02:37 PM

Elfstone requested that I write a bit about my general experience of the more traditional Mazatec ceremonial form of mushroom gnosis, I just wanted to write something brief up on the proper attitude by which the higher-level openings in mushroom-work can occur. During and around the mushroom season of 2010, I spent somewhere approaching nine months studying and experiencing the original form of Mazatec mushroom shamanism in Huautla de Jimenez, situated amongst mountains in the northern part of the Mexican state of Oaxaca. For those versed in psychedelic mushroom lore, Huautla de Jimenez is where ethnomycologist Gordon Wasson first experienced the awesome and wondrous effects of the sacred mushroom as recorded in the May 13th issue of Life magazine.

During my stay in Huautla de Jimenez, I was living perhaps 200 yards from Maria Sabina’s house; I met at least one of her grandchildren during my stay. Ultimately, there is very little information overall on the pattern and technique of the traditional Mazatec use of sacred mushrooms; the work of Gordon Wasson remains the primary resource for an original and inspired sense of how sacred mushrooms have traditionally been used. A good curriculum on the subject would include the works and articles of Gordon Wasson, Alvaro Estrada, Jerome Rothenberg, Henry Munn, and Thomas Riedlinger. Ralph Metzner’s introduction to ‘Sacred Mushroom of Visions: Teonanacatl’ gives a wonderful overview of the general subject that is sacred fungi. Metzner’s analysis of original source material in the Florentine Codex as recorded by Franciscan Bernardino de Sahagun, provides a cogent overview of some of the original functions of traditional mushroom usage.

To this day, the ancient tradition of the sacred mushroom itself is fairly shrouded in mystery and obscurity; traditional Mazatec are really quite discrete and unassuming in regards to the mushroom itself. The sacred mushroom is not a typical topic of casual conversation amongst the more traditional Mazatec; you would never expect to have a casual conversation with an old Mazatec grandmother about mushrooms. Ultimately, I have come to feel that there is something profoundly mercurial about the sacred mushroom itself; something that does not lend itself easily or readily to language and intellectual understanding. I view the sacred mushroom as a profound and resilient well-spring of original gnosis and wise guidance. Furthermore, I have come to view the sacred mushroom as a very good friend whom treats me with kindness and positive regard (and gives me the occasional and stern lecture should I need it). Central to the Mazatec understanding is this essential sense of kinship with the mushroom as a living well-spring of guidance, healing, deepened understanding and positively adjusted faith and forbearance. In the Mazatec ceremony, it is common that a person might incense the mushrooms before taking them and silently whisper or pray over them with tender terms of endearment. The Mazatec will affectionately refer—in adorational tones, to the mushroom as if it were a child or a family member: ‘my little children’, ‘my little holy children’, ‘my little holy saint children’, or simply ‘my little ones.’ A mushroom adept might speak to the mushroom in specific terms, addressing it directly: ‘do not worry my little children, it is only me: please help *so and so* tonight.’ The mushroom is not shared casually amongst people, but tends to be experienced between people on the most intimate levels possible, inculcating deep and resonant forms of empathic understanding between those souls captivated by the hierophanic mushroom-vision. In speaking of the sacred mushrooms as ‘flowers that inebriate’, the old Nahua poets write,

“Tell us, O priest, whence come
The flowers that inebriate?
The songs that inebriate?”
(Poesia Nahuatl 1 p 77)

“Only flowers are our wealth:
Through them friendship between us grows,
And through our song sadness vanishes.”
(Poesia Nahuatl 1 p 47)

The mushroom develops a powerful sense of friendship, trust and mutual understanding between adepts enraptured by the mushroomic ecstasy. The basic attitude is one encompassed by an icon quite typical of the Mazatec ceremonial altar: el santo niño de atocha. The mushroom is spoken to directly by using variations on the diminutive-form in Spanish, expressing a very unique and discrete form of affection and empathic understanding between the neophyte and his plant-teacher. In Gordon Wasson´s seminal ´The Wondrous Mushroom,' he convincingly argues that el santo niño de atocha is a local and christianized adaptation and form of the more archaic Nahua-child and plunging elf-god Piltzintli. My own altar contains an image of el santo niño de atocha, as in the below image:

SantoNino.jpg

What tends to escape the notice of contemporary magic-mushroom enthusiasts in our day and age, is that this adapted form of reverential-diminutive awe expressed in Mazatec prayer to the diositos (little gods) speaks directly to an ancient and powerful form of gnosis and emotional-intelligence that links us not only directly to the natural world, but the very world of the higher-sensorium. In my next post, I will talk about this higher-sensorial principle I refer to as the ´principle of discrete intelligence,' and how it relates to mushroom cultivation itself. With particular emphasis on Rupert Sheldrake´s theory of morphic resonance, I hope to suggest that through cultivating mushrooms we enter into a very special and unique sort of evolutionary relationship with both the mushroom, nature, and our own higher-sensorium itself (what Henry Corbin refers to as the Mundus Imaginalis).
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#48 anne halonium

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 02:47 PM

wow.
hope the mexicana gods smile on me like the peyote gods have.

im like, humbled, thats kinda novel for me.

someone should archive this thread for sure........:meditate:

#49 the_chosen_one

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 03:00 PM

wow.
hope the mexicana gods smile on me like the peyote gods have.

im like, humbled, thats kinda novel for me.

someone should archive this thread for sure........:meditate:


tagged! :bow:

i am at work and unable to read all of this, but where's the part where i gets some spores? :lol:

#50 wildedibles

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 03:08 PM

I wanna 2nd that
Great info
I am learning much here
Thank You :)

#51 elfstone

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 03:18 PM

There is a Mystery here that we all intuit. It is what draws us toward establishing a living relationship with these sacred plants to begin with. This can literally take root in our consciousness, nourished by cultivation of our deepest capacities for intention and thus nourishing our awareness of our own innate potential as conscious manifestations of the Mystery. In my friend and myself, this has become the guiding principal of our lives. We have been touched by something deeply profound in our relationship with this manifestation of the living spirit, Los Santos Niños, and it speaks to and through us to those able to receive it. We wish you all the blessed good fortune to open to this awareness and be transformed by it as we have. This mystery has literally turned my previously self-focused life into one of service to humanity, as it has brought forth and nourished my highest aspirations and spiritual longing. As a young man, over 37 years ago, The Saint Children shaped my perceptions of what was possible for my life and directed me into a path of professional service, where I have had the great blessing of developing my compassion towards others into the illuminating awareness of our essential oneness. Through entering into the joys and sufferings of those I serve, letting go of all attachments, a new consciousness has been brought forth that is empty of self and thus able to reside in the fullness of Being and act in the world from that higher dimensional matrix of who we really are. Subtly and mysteriously shepherding us in this process has been our relationship, rooted in awe and the deepest respect, for the sacred spirit of the mushroom. If entered upon as a spiritual quest, this relationship has much to offer. The Mazatecs know this well, which is why it has been guarded very carefully for centuries. R. Gordon Wasson received this understanding from Maria Sabina and also tried to share it's essentially sacred nature in his writings. And we too have been handed the keys and are charged with the responsibility of fully receiving, embodying and transmitting the tradition. I pray we are able to live up to it's fullest potential.

Edited by elfstone, 06 April 2012 - 04:11 PM.

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#52 anne halonium

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 08:27 PM

some incredible, and deep stuff.

peeps who arent following,
might wanna wiki
" maria sabina''

shes truly a lady who links past, present, and future.

when i grow up , i wanna be at least 10% as cool as her.

fungi in general ,
have a religious cultural relationship with peeps.
especially , the p mexicanas, IMO.


peeps need to remember the spiritual element on all this.


#53 teonanacatl

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 04:25 PM

One of the things that really struck me about the Mazatec approach to the magic-mushroom—in contrast to how it is often viewed in our own Western culture, is the degree to which the mushroom is appreciated and integrated by the Mazatec as an aspect of normal and everyday life. An old Mazatec grandmother or grandfather might exclaim in exasperation, ´I don´t know what is wrong with kids these days, they don´t even want to eat mushrooms anymore!´ Alot of how I try and relate to the mushroom has to do with really making a deliberate effort to simply carry myself with a certain basic integrity and decency. In a recent conversation with my dear friend Elfstone, he talked about praying to the mushroom that he might be able to carry himself with integrity and dignity. I really think this is a crucial aspect of relating to any of these sacred plants. What I think really ends up coming across in the Mazatec-ceremonial approach to the mushroom, their veneration of the mushroom as a disosito or niñito—a little precious one—is a very real and vital sense of the sacred in all of the little details of life. To me, the diositos—the precious little ones-- speak to the form of the sacred in the little details of our lives: the way we conduct ourselves on a daily basis.


For those of us who grow mushrooms at home, this attention to detail becomes essential to the entire process of cultivation. Sterile-culture work subsists and succeeds on the degree to which we pay attention to the little details of the process. One of the things really interesting to me in regards to the cultivation of mushrooms under sterile parameters is the use of the word ´culture´ in the first place. Because, what we are talking about here is something that we actively cultivate, domesticate, engender and develop as part of a symbiotic relationship with nature. In attending to the details, I believe what in fact happens is that we realize we are an intimately connected and wholly creative expression of nature itself: domestication, cultivation IS nature. Anthropologist Christian Ratsch talks about psychoactivity itself as being the ´fountain of culture.´ Across history, this symbiotic process we experience in regards to nature has been the source of profound shifts in human culture. Agriculture and animal husbandry extend far back into pre-history, and has been functional in the expansion of the human species across several niches on planet earth. Forest gardening and horticultural societies along jungle-clad river banks and wet foothills in monsoon regions effectively laid the foundations for the modern forms of civilization. Many anthropologists have argued that the division of labour subsequent to these forms of plant-human symbiosis are the elemental prima materia upon which higher cultural achievements such as graphics art, poetry, philosophy and epic literature are based. Yet, what is it precisely about the human-plant symbiosis that evolves such cultural innovation?


Gazing back into the roots of our own Western civilization, we find the mysteries at Eleusis which were arguably fueled by a human-plant relationship. In the works of the Pre-Socratic philosopher Empedocles—one of the father´s of science, western civilization and the theory of elements in chemistry--we find an elaborate symbology that utilizes plant metaphors in it´s enumeration,


´Here we need to remember the special importance Empedocles attached to describing the principles of love and repulsion in the world of plants; his self-declared expertise, as a sorcerer, in the field of plant remedies and magic; and the fact that, when he gives instructions to his disciple for mastering the magical power of his teaching, he specifically compares the process of nurturing his words with the process of tending and nurturing plants.´ (from pg. 299 of Peter Kingsley´s ´Ancient Philosophy, Mystery and Magic´)


So what is it about entering into a relationship with a plant that has this tendency to inspire cultural innovation and transformation? One of the really fascinating and interesting aspects of Rupert Sheldrake´s ´theory of morphic resonance' describes the manner in which new morphic fields are generated by the evolutionary process. In chapter four of Sheldrake´s ´A New Science of Life: The Hypothesis of Formative Causation,' he speculates as to the particular form and nature of what he calls ´morphogenetic germs,' observing that ´during morphogenesis a new higher-level morphic unit comes into being around this germ, under the influence of a specific morphogenetic field.´ So let me simply suggest that this observed association between human cultural innovation and plants is a form of morphogenesis; the ´germ´ or ´soul' of a human being comes under the influence of the specific ´morphogenetic field of the plant.´


When the Mazatec refer to their diosito, they are in fact refering to this ´higher-level morphic unit´ that constellates around the soul of a being enraptured by the morphogenetic field of the mushroom-intelligence. In a very real sense then, you can describe the onset of the mushroom-ecstasy as being a process of incubation and gestation whereby the mushroom ingests your very mind in order to produce a higher-form and transformed entity. This is the true meaning of the Greek word from which ecstasy is derived, ekstasis or to be completely removed from oneself; the mushroom takes you outside of your limited ego-cocoon.
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#54 ConsciousFeeder

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 07:59 PM

This is a beautiful thread. Intriguing read packed full of a prolific strain, cultural information, and introduced me to Maria Sabina.

I thank you:bow:

#55 anne halonium

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 08:57 PM

ok, does this strain have an official designation ? name?

im gonna start calling them '"chicon nindo".........
maybe a number series.... like , CNM01 , CNM02 , etc.........
unless someone has an objection...........

"chicon nindo- huatla de jimenez"

would be punishing on the sharpies x multiple containers.


#56 ConsciousFeeder

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 09:12 PM

Just to chime in on some stuff I've learned just from this thread:

Maria Sabina - http://en.wikipedia....ki/Maria_Sabina

carpophore
1. A fleshy, spore-producing body of basidiomycetes and ascomycetes. In common usage, the term mushroom is applied to carpophores that have a distinctive stipe and cap.
2. A slender stalk that supports each half of a dehisced fruit in many members of the parsley family.


umbonate
Having or resembling a knob or knoblike protuberance.


senesce
To reach later maturity; grow old.

<3

Edited by ConsciousFeeder, 08 April 2012 - 09:16 PM.
Anne halonium has a keen eye. :D


#57 anne halonium

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 09:14 PM

^ya forgot the maria sabina part......

id like this strain to help get me back to ground zero on the spirit.

decades of cubes, i need a spiritual revival.


#58 teonanacatl

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 09:45 PM

ok, does this strain have an official designation ? name?

im gonna start calling them '"chicon nindo".........
maybe a number series.... like , CNM01 , CNM02 , etc.........
unless someone has an objection...........

"chicon nindo- huatla de jimenez"

would be punishing on the sharpies x multiple containers.


I have just been calling it the Chicon Nindo Mexicana, or cn-mex for short. Using the term ´Huautla´ would be more readily recognizable to people, it is simply that there is already a widely circulated ´Huautla-´strain of cubensis. The term ´Chicon Nindo´ actually gives it a specific geographic tag, in that the ´Chicon Nindo´ is the Mazatec name for the actual mountain upon which they were found. It has a personal meaning to me, in so far as it concerns one of my most favorite stories about Maria Sabina--recounted in Alvaro Estrada´s ´Maria Sabina: Her Life and Chants,' and her encounter with the Chicon Nindo. After the death of her first husband, Sabina performed a vigil for her sister. During the vigil, she had a vision of several arch-angelic type beings whom she described as ´the Principal Ones of whom my ancestors spoke.' In this vision, the Principal One´s gave her a book they called ´The Book of Wisdom,' and ´The Book of Language.´ It was a book she was given in order to perform her healing work. In her own words,

´I had attained perfection, I was no longer a simple apprentice. For that, as a prize, as a nomination, the Book had been granted me. When one takes the saint children, one can see the Principal Ones. Otherwise not. And it´s because the mushrooms are saints; they give wisdom. Wisdom is Language. Language is in the book. The Book is granted by the Principal Ones. The Principal Ones appear through the great power of the children.´


and then later in the same recounting,


´In that same vigil, after the Book disappeared, I had another vision: I saw the Supreme Lord of the Mountains, Chicon Nindo. I saw a man on h orseback come toward my hut. I knew—the voice told me—that that being was an important person. His mount was beautiful: a white horse, white as foam. A beautiful horse.


The personage reined up his mount at the door of my hut. I could see him through the walls. I was inside the house but my eyes had the power to see through any obstacle. The personage waited for me to go out.


With decision I went out to meet him. I stood next to him.


Yes it was Chicon Nindo, he who lives on Nindo Tocosho, he who is the Lord of the Mountains. He who has the power to enchant spirits. He who himself cures the sick.


To whom turkeys are sacrificed, to whom the Curers give cacao in order for him to cure.


I stood next to him and went closer. I saw that he didn´t have a face though he wore a white sombrero. His face, yes, his face was like a shadow.


The night was black; the clouds covered the sky but Chicon Nindo was like a being covered by a halo. I became mute.


Chicon Nindo didn´t say a word. All of a suddent he set his mount into motion to continue on his way. He disappeared along the path, in the direction of his dwelling place: the enormous Mountain of Adoration, Nindo Tocosh. He lives there, while I live on Fortress Mountain, the closest one to Nindo Tocosho. That makes us neighbors. Chicon Nindo had come because in my wise Language I had called him.´


In clarification, the mountain referred to by Sabina as ´Nindo Tocosho,' is referred to interchangably by locals as also being the deity whom dwells in the mountain, ´Chicon Nindo,' as well as being referred to at the peak as the ´cerro de adoracion,´ the ´mountain of adoration.´ The terms are use interchangeably by the Mazatec to refer to the same place. Also, while in this particular story Sabina talks about living on ´Fortress Mountain,' in her latter life she moved into a house on the Chicon Nindo itself, at the mouth of a pathway leading up to the crest of the cerro de adoracion. The place in which I harvested the original prints of this species was perhaps 200 yards from this house.



So, I do personally like the name ´Chicon-Nindo Mexicana´ for these reasons, but am happy to see people call it whatever they wish really.


Many blessings,


Teo

Edited by teonanacatl, 08 April 2012 - 09:52 PM.

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#59 anne halonium

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 10:49 PM

cool,
um......


henceforth ,
i shall refer to this amazing strain as,
"chicon nindon mexicana".

i may add numbers, or nicknames to specific sub strains of note.


i suspect this will be a paradigm shifting strain,
on many levels..........


#60 darkman

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 11:40 PM

^ya forgot the maria sabina part......

id like this strain to help get me back to ground zero on the spirit.

decades of cubes, i need a spiritual revival.


Isn't this also a psilobybe? P.Mexicana, or just a substrain of Psilosybe? or what is the difference in the ones you are growing on fert agar and these?




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