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New strain of Ps. Mexicana from Eastern slope of Chicon Nindo in Huatla de Jimenez


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#101 Uncle G

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 08:21 PM

LOVE THE THREAD. Ex pans my mind and thoughts.

#102 elfstone

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 08:58 PM

Teo and I find they do better on ryegrass seed, overall, with some supplementation with rye berries, steel cut oats, and wheat bran...though I am interested to see what they my do on other substrates...good luck!

#103 anne halonium

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 09:33 PM

just so happens,
annie has a selection in the grainery ,
and ,was eyeing the rye berries...........


the mycelia is really ghosty though.


2cansami.JPG

#104 Star Cap

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 09:35 PM

I'm interested in having a velada using the Chicon Nindo strain. It would seem appropriate considering where they had come from. It's too bad that our society has forgotten the need of the shaman. From a little reading I've found that I like that Maria Sabina used othe Diositos for ocuring the sick. I've heard of hallucinogens changing people and only recently curing people. I've heard Terrance Mckenna claim that LSD had cured alcholisim when it was used legaly by doctors.

It's been close to a decade since I last used the mushroom. I've always been intrigued by them and eventually I had used them somewhat often. Then I stopped using illegal substances. Now 10 years later they are calling me and I have a need to be re framed by them. I need a cleansing. This time I will raise my own little ones and partake seeking assistance. I have many things I'd like answers to and what I've been trying isn't working. Or is slowly working. It's time to get down to the myc if things and get some curing going on.
I wish I could fast and climb a mountain to eat cubes and meditate with the guidance of a true shaman.
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#105 ConsciousFeeder

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 10:07 PM

The spiritual longing you speak of is something that has made itself dramatically apparent in my life as of the past two months. Personally I have never enjoyed mushrooms and their affects but for some reason I found myself here learning more and more about them. Then I started having dreams that integrated mushrooms into them. I had a dream that was panning about a foot off the ground going in and out of water along a riverbed that was covered in mushrooms. During that dream I was listening to Sasha Shulgin speak, sadly I don't remember of what. I also did a tremendous amount of research when getting into the cultivation of marijuana but never had a single dream about them even after hours and hours of research. That week I had 5 different days which involved dreams of mushrooms in some way either watching them grow and fruit or them just apart of the scenery in the dream. Dreams are sacred in many ways to me and my life and dreaming about mushrooms so consistently since I undertook my recent project shows an unconscious longing or calling to these fungi.

#106 teonanacatl

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 10:54 AM

The spiritual longing you speak of is something that has made itself dramatically apparent in my life as of the past two months. Personally I have never enjoyed mushrooms and their affects but for some reason I found myself here learning more and more about them. Then I started having dreams that integrated mushrooms into them. I had a dream that was panning about a foot off the ground going in and out of water along a riverbed that was covered in mushrooms. During that dream I was listening to Sasha Shulgin speak, sadly I don't remember of what. I also did a tremendous amount of research when getting into the cultivation of marijuana but never had a single dream about them even after hours and hours of research. That week I had 5 different days which involved dreams of mushrooms in some way either watching them grow and fruit or them just apart of the scenery in the dream. Dreams are sacred in many ways to me and my life and dreaming about mushrooms so consistently since I undertook my recent project shows an unconscious longing or calling to these fungi.


Dreams are a def. source of inspiration and revelation; that is pretty amazing you have been dreaming so much about the mushroom. Maybe try and keep a journal, so you can re-visit it after you take the mushroom.

#107 anne halonium

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 08:15 PM

chicon nindo mycelia, fert rice , PP5

kiopl.JPG

dreamy isnt it?........

Edited by anne halonium, 25 April 2012 - 08:55 PM.


#108 ConsciousFeeder

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 03:31 AM

chicon nindo mycelia, fert rice , PP5

[ATTACH=CONFIG]264954[/ATTACH]

dreamy isnt it?........


Dreamy? Its wondrous! Stupendous even.

#109 teonanacatl

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 10:24 AM

I'm interested in having a velada using the Chicon Nindo strain. It would seem appropriate considering where they had come from. It's too bad that our society has forgotten the need of the shaman. From a little reading I've found that I like that Maria Sabina used othe Diositos for ocuring the sick. I've heard of hallucinogens changing people and only recently curing people. I've heard Terrance Mckenna claim that LSD had cured alcholisim when it was used legaly by doctors.

It's been close to a decade since I last used the mushroom. I've always been intrigued by them and eventually I had used them somewhat often. Then I stopped using illegal substances. Now 10 years later they are calling me and I have a need to be re framed by them. I need a cleansing. This time I will raise my own little ones and partake seeking assistance. I have many things I'd like answers to and what I've been trying isn't working. Or is slowly working. It's time to get down to the myc if things and get some curing going on.
I wish I could fast and climb a mountain to eat cubes and meditate with the guidance of a true shaman.


There were a series of pilot studies done in the 60s that suggested LSD could be used to effectively treat alcoholism; the moratrium placed on this research as a result of the mass scheduling done in 1967 effectively ended all scientific inquiry into the healing potential of these compounds. Only recently, has research on this started up again, and the results are promising: http://www.bbc.co.uk...health-17297714. As some of you may know, Bill Wilson--founder of Alcoholics Anonymous--was a proponent of the use of LSD,

¨One of his therapeutic journeys lead him to Trabuco College in California, and the friendship of the college’s founder, Aldous Huxley. The author of Brave New World and The Doors of Perception introduced Wilson to LSD-25. The drug rocked Wilson’s world. He thought of it as something of a miracle substance and continued taking it well into the ‘60s. As he approached his 70th birthday, he developed a plan to have LSD distributed at all AA meetings nationwide. The plan was eventually quashed by more rational voices, and a few years later the Federal government made the point moot by making the drug illegal.¨

I recently guided a friend of mine through a rather harrowing ibogaine experience, in an effort to free him from alcoholism; from what I can tell, ibogaine is actually more effective than LSD in this regard.

#110 elfstone

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 03:24 PM

The spirit in the mushroom itself, Los Santos Niños, was Maria Sabina's teacher. They have their own agenda. Approach them with respect and they will teach you too. You don't need the "shaman" for this to happen, just purity of intent and a focused mind and heart. Remember to breathe.


I'm interested in having a velada using the Chicon Nindo strain. It would seem appropriate considering where they had come from. It's too bad that our society has forgotten the need of the shaman. From a little reading I've found that I like that Maria Sabina used othe Diositos for ocuring the sick. I've heard of hallucinogens changing people and only recently curing people. I've heard Terrance Mckenna claim that LSD had cured alcholisim when it was used legaly by doctors.

It's been close to a decade since I last used the mushroom. I've always been intrigued by them and eventually I had used them somewhat often. Then I stopped using illegal substances. Now 10 years later they are calling me and I have a need to be re framed by them. I need a cleansing. This time I will raise my own little ones and partake seeking assistance. I have many things I'd like answers to and what I've been trying isn't working. Or is slowly working. It's time to get down to the myc if things and get some curing going on.
I wish I could fast and climb a mountain to eat cubes and meditate with the guidance of a true shaman.



#111 teonanacatl

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 11:47 AM

I have been reflecting with particular focus this morning on the inner-complexity and apparent contradictions of the so-called ´red road,´ the plant path; in the Mazatec way, I feel as if I have re-discovered an ancient pattern that quite likely shares an archaic root with the Pythagorean/Orphic traditions of ancient Greece. Having spent many years loosely affiliated with US ´drug culture,' I have quite often been struck with the insincerity and lack of depth and intelligence in regards to the conventional approach to psychedelics and plant compounds. I have met numerous people in this culture who emulate native american ways and ´play indian,´ so to speak. I have met an inordinately large number of people who have subsumed these sacred-plant compounds into drug-dependency patterns. Having spent time in some of the most impoverished places in the United States--the Lakot pine ridge reservation in South Dakota--as well as across the world: oceanic shanty towns in the urban nightmares of India. I have seen up close and personal while people have destroyed their lives with alcohol, heroin and plant-derived compounds such as cocaine.

Sometimes I am struck by the sheer enigma and contradiction that while on the one-hand SO many people suffer with drug-dependency and psychological issues related to drug use, on the other hand I have been ushered in to a deep and abiding experience of the truly sacred with these plants. When I was drinking ayahuasca in the jungle, there was one question that burned itself into my mind: ´for all of the suffering, sorrow and uncertainty: is the truth actually worth it?´ Living in a culture that has dis-avowed these sacred plants, and actively persecuted those who use them, is it worth it?

The simple and abiding truth at hand is this: these plants are sacred gifts from another world. When I reflect in depth on the particular challenge of this path, I am overwhelmed by a gratitude I can only describe as transcendent: ´gratitude is heaven itself´ -William Blake. While living in the midst of a culture that--to a large degree--has not the slightest clue of what the sacred in fact is, I have learned the lessons of patience, forebearance and long-suffering. The higher potential in these plants is in teaching us how to live our lives with greater compassion, empathy, good-will and a burning resolve that is the highest aspiration: to live a life of service to others.

In the mazatec way, the ceremony truly begins with the lighting of a pure-beeswax candle. A single match is lit mindfully, and the shaman will make the sign of the cross with the lit match: blessing the altar and the candle with prayer. The prayer is a very particular sort of prayer, it is the prayer of the heart

´He bebido vino de honges y I have drunk wine of mushrooms
llora mi corazon and my heart weeps.´
-from the Poesia Nahuatl 2

The path of the language/logos-healer is very much the ancient Orphic-tradition of the poet. This true poetry of the heart is like this flame upon the Mazatec altar: lit from within. JW Goethe spoke to the heart of this flame in his poem ´The Holy Longing:´

Tell a wise person, or else keep silent,



Because the massman will mock it right away.



I praise what is truly alive,



What longs to be burned to death.




In the calm water of love nights,



Where you were begotten, where you have begotten,



A strange feeling comes over you



When you see the silent candle burning.



Now you are no longer caught



In the obsession with darkness,



And a desire for higher lovemaking



Sweeps you forward.



Distance does not make you falter



Now, arriving in magic, flying



And finally insane for the light,



You are the butterfly, and you are gone.



And so long as you haven't experienced this:



To die, and so to grow,



You are only a troubled guest



On the dark earth.





When I cross the candle and light it in my own ceremony, I recite a poem that was dictated to me in a dream by an uncle of mine who had died:


Though this path before me
streches clearly;
and long the winding road
that leads me,
Each step I take
but follows surely:
Crux Mea Stella,
The Cross is My Star.

And though this life
shall surely wither
as an ocean so receives
the river
like a truthfulness
endures forever:
Crux Mea Stella
The Cross is my Star.

And though my shadow
surely follows
an olive tree ´neath
a sleeping hollow,
so too shall follow
a bright tomorrow:
Crux Mea Stella
The Cross is my Star.

For in these two
worlds colliding
the gentle joy
of calm abiding
as a dove descends
so gently gliding
and perching henceforth
deep inside me:
Crux Mea Stella,
The Cross is my Star.

While to the undiscerning, this prayer may simply be interpreted as an homage to the Christian-mythos (keep in mind the mazatec way is a syncretic form of gnostic-Christianity), there are deeper layers here. From the latin ´Crux Mea Stella,´ this is a poem to the underworld crossroads and the Holy Mother-Goddess one meets there: the morning star, or Venus. I keep special poems and writings on the altar, from the works of Parmenides, Empedocles, Rumi and others. The lighting of the candle is an affectionate and focussed homage to my teachers and all beings: I eat the mushroom as a sacred act.

In the next post, I will try and discuss preliminary preparations and the basic principles of ritual cleanliness in receiving the holy mushroom Spirit.

Edited by teonanacatl, 27 April 2012 - 12:08 PM.


#112 teonanacatl

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 12:30 PM

I just wanted to mention a bit about this ´cross´ or ´crossroads´ motif, which is the basic idea that there is a crux-point where our world and the Other-world meet. The following is taken from an essay I have been working on:

¨In learning about the biopsychosocial and ecological systems approaches to developmental
psychology, we are generally impressed with the idea that various discrete and basic forces of human
development are 'synthesized' in some way. In the biopsychosocial model, biological, psychological
and social forces are synthesized to provide us with a picture of how behavior develops. For example,
we might be told that a given individual may have a biological predisposition towards alcoholism
exacerbated by a sociocultural millieu in which the consumption of alcohol is encouraged. In
ecological systems theory, development is integrated or synthesized with the environmental context in
which it occurs. Urie Bronfenbrenner's particular conception of Ecological Systems Theory partially
addresses a deficiency present in biopsychosocial models of human development. That is, while
biopsychosocial models will talk about a synthesis of biological and social forces in a particular
behavior, they never discretely mention the synthetic factor itself. We are left to kind of guess what is
meant by the charming—albeit poorly defined and conceptualized—notion that biological,
psychological and social forces converge somewhere/somehow to generate human behavior and
developmental norms. It is almost as if we are given one hundred pieces to a puzzle and told that all of
the pieces lying scattered about the ground are the puzzle itself. This might be true in a very clumsy
and inelegant sense, but you have to put the puzzle together to see the whole image; the image itself
is what I call the ´synthetic factor.´

Bronfenbrenner's theory addresses this deficiency in the biopsychosocial model by describing a
synthetic factor he calls the 'system.' In the idea of the system, we have a discretely defined image or
mathematical symbol for describing the synthesis of developmental forces. The primary deficiency in
Bronfenbrenner's theory—a problem implicit to many developmental theories—is that it fails to
address the deep imperative that is consciousness or the reality of the psyche itself. Oddly enough, most
developmental theories covered in an introductory psychology course will treat consciousness—with
it's rich store of creative images and ideas—as an ancillary and insignificant phenomenon. It is almost
as if conciousness itself is—like spiritual qualities such as faith--considered grotesque and taboo. The
psyche itself is psychology's dirty little secret, it's sordid affair. Carl Jung really and profoundly
predicted this deficiency in psychological theory in his magnum opus and last major work: Mysterium
Coniunctionis. Jung's closing observations on the unus mundus (from the latin 'one world') constitute
some of the most intriguing speculations in all of psychology. For not only are these observations the
fruit of seventy years of clinical observation, Jung's suggestion has profound implications across
several fields. Seminal figures such as Nobel laureate, theoretical and quantum physicist Wolfgang
Pauli were heavily influenced by the closing observations in Jung's Mysterium Coniunctionis. In fact,
Pauli considered Jung—together with Neils Bohr—to be one of his primary mentors (Lindorff, 2004)
In talking about the 16th century Belgian alchemist Gerhard Dorn, Jung directly addresses this
deficiency in developmental theory,

¨If Dorn, then, saw the consummation of the mysterium coniunctionis in the union of the
alchemically produced caelum with the unus mundus, he expressly meant not a fusion of the
individual with his environment, or even his adaptation to it, but a unio mystica with the
potential world. Such a view indeed seems to us 'mystical,' if we misuse this word in its
pejorative modern sense. It is not, however, a question of thoughtlessly used words but of a
view which can be translated from medieval language into modern concepts.” (Jung, 1963)

That is to say, while developmental theories such as the biopsychosocial and systems theory approach
will place a great deal of emphasis on context, environment, and genetics, they tend to avoid that
salient and synthetic feature of consciousness which I call 'discrete intelligence,' defined by Jung as a
'unio mystica with the potential world.¨

I mention this in connection with the mushroom and the ´crossroads-´motif for a particular reason. One of the truly, truly remarkable things that one begins to discover in plumbing the depths of the psilocybin-trance, is that you are in fact directly interacting with a discrete intelligence in the form of a personified plant-teacher. For all of the reading I have done over the years, I will say in all honesty that when I truly realized that the mushroom was not only intelligent, but had taken me under it´s wing as a student: I was truly amazed and shocked.

#113 cym

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 02:35 PM

absolutely magnificent.
the origin of the print only adds to the interest factor with these...

good thread all around.

#114 McDozd

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 03:41 PM

All plants have spirits or energy flowing through them.

I think consuming them and the energy is what connects us to their spirit, or teacher.

Thanks for sharing all that Teo.. very good read.

:hippie:

#115 Bassmeditation

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 04:00 PM

After seeing the pics I fainted, woke back up, saw the pics and fainted again. I would LOVE to get my hands on some of these! good luck, though apparently you dont need any luck. Awesome stuff man!

#116 teonanacatl

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 09:38 AM

third flush:

flush3.jpg

So the first time I fruited them with the same fruiting-media/casing method, but under 6500K lights ... the third flush was basically like one fruit. We have had some folks on other forums question whether the 453nm blue-LED lighting is truly to credit for the really outstanding results here. I have to say that I really feel it has made ALL of the difference in this grow. This should take me up to 100grams of carpophores by dry weight, from only 3 quart jars ... really a helluva a yield.

I took maybe 40 prints from the last batch. Interestingly enough, 30 of the prints were taken on glass slides: 100% of the glass slides came out nice and thick. I took 10 prints on aluminum foil, and of those 10 only 2 came out really nice and thick: the other 8 were quite light. So, it appears aluminum foil does not work well for making spore-prints with these guys. My guess is that there is some sort of electrostatic gradient at the molecular level that induces the spores to drop from the lamella/gilled surface. Placing the mushrooms on tin-foil would then ostensibly interrupt this electrostatic gradient in some way.

Edited by teonanacatl, 28 April 2012 - 09:54 AM.

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#117 teonanacatl

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 09:47 AM

One thing that also may be part of the results here is the casing-technique I developed. For many years, casing was really problematic for me with lots of trichoderma contamination. So, I basically developed a particular pasteurization technique that works really well. I have left casings unattended with zero FAE over five month periods with this technique, and had zero contamination pop up. So, I know it works for defeating trichoderma in the casing.

Basically I mix 4:1 sifted peat moss:calci-sand ( http://www.petsmart....oductId=2752729 ) colorless *and make sure yer CaCO3 source is magnesium free and NOT CaOH2 unless you can make a correct pH calculation*, bring it up to the correct moisture-content, pack it into a series of quart jars. Cap the jars, and in the center jar I use a cap with a nail-punched hole in it. I place a thermometer into the center of the casing material through the hole. Place all the jars in a stock pot lined on the bottom with old jar lids or something to elevate the jars off the heated metal bottom-surface. Fill with cool water and then turn the heat on high. I then allow the water to start boiling, and around the time the temperature hits 115F on the thermometer, I cut and then monitor the heat. Once it reaches 150F, I start the timer and maintain the temperature between 150F-170F (160F or so is perfect) for 1.5 hours.

It is kind of a pain in the ass, but I know it works very well ... and could have possibly contributed to the great results here. Sterilization of the casing layer apparently also works; as to which one works better, we don´t really know yet.

Edited by teonanacatl, 28 April 2012 - 10:16 AM.


#118 teonanacatl

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 10:40 AM

´The little mushroom comes of itself, no one knows whence, like the wind that comes we know not whence or why.´ -Victor Hernandez

You all will have to forgive my extensive posts here; I notice as these little guys flush, I become filled with verbal-linguistic energy. I think they want more people to become aware of the ritual-ceremonial aspect of their usage, and the higher possibilities of our working with them.

In both forms of tryptamine-shamanism--those forms related to the ingestion of the ayahuasca-brew as well as mushroom shamanism--certain ritual proscriptions/observances are made. Interestingly enough, in both forms of shamanism the prohibitions are essentially the same. In mushroom shamanism, preparation for a velada involves basically three primary abstentions:

1. Abstinence from sex for four days before and after the velada. This seems to be the most important abstention.
2. Abstinence from the ingestion of alcohol for four days before and after the velada.
3. Abstinence from pork and heavy meats for four days before and after the velada. (there seems to be some flexibility around this one, but I personally refrain from eating all meat in this period)

While in the ingestion of ayahuasca, these proscriptions make sense in terms of some of the potential contra-indications involved in the ingestion of beta-carboline MAOIs such as harmine/harmaline, the purpose for these proscriptions in mushroom shamanism is less clear. In Huautla de Jimenez, I was often told admonitory stories about the potential consequences of violating the above observances: misfortunes that have happened to others etc.

In my opinion, these observances have alot to do about approaching the mushroom-Spirit with a certain sense of respect and fidelity. In this sense, the first prosciption against sex can be thought of as involving a certain type of fidelity in one´s heart towards the mushroom. You can think of the mushroom as being a sort of intimate lover that you are consecrating your energies towards. On another level, most of us have realized that the sexual act involves a deep element of both physical and energetic bonding. As such, the sexual act can quite often leave us with a particular sort of ´energetic trace´ that can be amplified in a disconcerting way under the influence of the mushroom.

The abstention against alcohol only makes good, common sense to me. If you are trying to approach the mushroom with a clear heart and mind, the use of alcohol makes no sense: it is numbing to the mind and effectively closes down the channel of communication between the mushroom and the neophyte. Again, there is an issue of spiritual-energetic fidelity at work here.

The absention against meat is also largely energetic. Much like with the sex-act, what you ingest leaves a certain energetic imprint that can confabulate the clarity of the mushroom. The meat-vibe under the effect of the mushroom can be quite coarse and usher in some rather unpleasant psychedelic-spaces; Terence Mckenna actually describes one of the deeply unpleasant psilocybin-spaces with the term ´the meat locker.´

I also wanted to mention, and I know this sounds a bit unusual: in my last mushroom vigil, the mushroom made it very clear that I had to stop using cannabis. In my experience--and I know elfstone agrees here--the cannabis and mushroom spirit appear to be inconsonant with one anothers action. As such, I view this abstention as being an extension of the second proscription against the use of alcohol. So, I would tend to recommend abstaining from cannabis for four days before and after the velada, though your mileage may vary ... there is obviously no one right way to do this. I have simply come to see and know directly what works for me.

Edited by teonanacatl, 28 April 2012 - 10:59 AM.


#119 anne halonium

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 11:46 AM

im still paying close attention to this thread..............

#120 Star Cap

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 03:33 PM

Thanks for the outline Teo. These are aspects of the ceremony that I am intetested in. Were the veladas performed 1 on 1 or in group?




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