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self sustaining fishing pond


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#1 benderislord

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 11:36 AM

so if you had the land and money
and presuming you enjoy the outdoors/fishing
what size pond/lake would you build?
what species flora AND fauna would you stock it with
to create a self sustaining system?
be as creative as you wish with in reason
and as much bio diversity as this environment would allow

#2 Peyote

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 01:42 PM

depends on climate dosnt it ?

#3 Uncle G

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 02:10 PM

Well I want it deep enough. Most people dig theirs to shallow and that causes sickness and poisoning of the fish. Lilly pads are beautiful but they can take over a pond quick. I would want a bass pond myself. Anyway that is my random thoughts.

#4 Foster

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 02:10 PM

If I had the money... I would build a pond/lake with a minimum of 1 acre surface area (5-7 acres would be preferable). Probably make it kidney shaped, with a dam/drain at one end and the other end shallow water. At least 20 ft deep at the dam. I'd add some rip-rap along the dam to give the fish some place to hide out in the summer.

As far as fish go, I'd go with what I know works here in the midwest. I'd stock it with channel cat, bass, bluegill/crappie, and carp. Maybe throw in some yellow bellies and blue cat too.
Frogs, ducks, turtles, and geese, along with all the other wildlife present, would find their own way in soon enough.
As far as fauna, well that's a bit tougher. I'd put in some willow on each end. Probably like some nice, fast growing, shade trees to fish under. I'd plant a few cottonwood/poplar, a few cypress, some maple, and for sure some white pine.
Some of the best bass fishing areas I've seen were surrounded by white pine.

As far as water fauna goes, the shallow end will eventually grow water lilies and cattails. I don't know of anything I'd want to plant in the water.

I believe, from past experience, that for my area those choices would provide a sustainable system within a few years.

As a child to early teen I was fortunate enough to have 40 acres of land, a seven acre lake (fully stocked with species listed above),a yamaha yz80, a go-cart with a 250 ducati engine , and a 1/2 mile of, long ago closed, two lane drag strip to play on.
Some of the best years of my life were spent fishing, and playing at the lake and property.
Ah.. the days of my youth...

Its always good to dream anyway. Hopefully you're asking because you have the opportunity. I know I'd be all over it if the money was there.

#5 riseabovethought

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 10:54 AM

I know I'd be all over it if the money was there.


To me, the coolest thing one could do if the land was available and so was the energy and intent, is make the pond make you money. It should be beyond only sustainable, in present times its more important than ever, it could be profitable. I'd say there are a number of road maps to make this happen, if you dont mind putting a good bit of your attention on it. :eusa_ange

I wish we'd get some more creative responses to this question, since we have some of the greatest minds with natural spin, on the planet. :eusa_pray

#6 Foster

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 04:43 PM

To me, the coolest thing one could do if the land was available and so was the energy and intent, is make the pond make you money. It should be beyond only sustainable, in present times its more important than ever, it could be profitable. I'd say there are a number of road maps to make this happen, if you dont mind putting a good bit of your attention on it. :eusa_ange


How very true. The lake I spoke of, where I spent my youth, was a pay lake. fee fishing. $2.50 per pole, no catch limits. Had tournaments for biggest catch and $500 prize for catching "BigMuddy" the 48 lb mud cat we stocked. Its how we made our living. Selling homemade bait, hunting nightcrawlers and selling those for bait, pickin berries and selling those in several forms. Hot dogs, barbecue, sodas,sandwiches etc..
We also had ice skating in the winter when the lake froze solid enough. Til some drunk ass fell and sued us. That was the end of the lake. It was drained and turned into commercial property and a golf course. Bastards.

#7 pharmer

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 05:26 PM

unless you enclose the pond in a screened in dome you're likely to get what nature gives you, at least within a couple decades. you could plant anything you want but if it isn't what mother nature wants there it won't stay long and will be quickly replaced with what's in every other pond in the area.

it's pretty widely accepted that birds/ducks carry fish eggs and aquatic weed seeds(?) on their feet which gets broadcast as they move from one pond to the next. the overall effect is an averaging of flora and fauna over the general climate of the region.

the O.P. mentions having an unlimited supply of money so all of that is moot.

my pond would be deep enough to be cold and have enough aerators to be able to keep trout. bullfrogs are fun to listen to.

#8 benderislord

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 01:48 AM

pretty good so far
i was thinking from the clay layer up
during the initial building of the small lake
40ft on the deep end grading up to 35 and in further
increments of 5ft until near shore then a 3ft shallow
after the sealing clay has been spread and tamped a layer
of fine sand should probably be poured in place to help
keep the clay from disruptions then a layer small gravel
in the deep end i would pour down the culture for the
nitrite to nitrate bacteria then pour a layer of graded silt
this will be a fav spot of many large mouth bass during hot days
then along the 30ft plateau short growing water grass seed
will be plotted out then covered with fine sand from there up
to the 20ft plateau random smooth outcroppings for hiding spots
at 20ft there will be far more light so other slow/small growing water
plants can live such as various algae and short matted grasses
from to 20ft mark to the 5ft mark fine gravel will be laid evenly
and small flatish stone will be centered along the bottom to
allow for breeding/hiding and some long growing algae with be
cultured to the surfaces of those stones these will provide
great breeding grounds for snails/crayfish which i would stock
2 species of snail and 2 of crayfish
the snails i am undecided on yet the crayfish would be the cloning
variety for production of feeder creatures for the fish
and a larger variety recently discovered in Tennessee
along the more shallow waters of 5ft to shore in some patches
i would plant down small water flowers and horsetail reed
the reeds can be restricted with a simple border of 2 1/2ft
of weed guard cloth for fish i would stock big mouth bass
rock bass,white bass,speckled cat fish,blue gill,pumpkin sun fish
then a few different minnow type fish for feeders/fishing bait
i would also add a hill with pilings from the excavation to make
a manmade water fall and would have that at the deep end
this should provide more than enough aeration and water flow
to keep it cool and very clear solar pump for the water fall and
water level maintaining well just for this lake
as far as birds go....hell i have a few good guns and enjoy
fresh roasted fowl ;) so i wouldn't have to worry about much
given how voracious the top fish species are
i would also of course have to stock the water for a full year
in advance with micro-flora and fauna in the form of fresh water
phytoplankton just to ensure all the filter feeders will have enough
i have been browsing for some fresh water shell fish and im not finding
much that would take to colder waters though i have heard there are
a few species of fresh water shrimp that do not need a saline environment
for spawning would love to have shrimp an clams of some sort in my lake

#9 cheetolay

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 07:50 AM

if i were able to build a body of water with money not being an issue, i would make it about 2-3 acres large, up to 50' deep on one end with the other end being 25' deep. i would stock it with catfish, blue gill, crappie, and possibly walleye instead of bass. but as mentioned above, nature would probably take care of the rest after a few years.

#10 Myc

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 08:19 AM

I got to play with an uncle's setup in central Texas.

He used a string of holding ponds which were routed along a natural drainage.
The higher tank was close to the house but shallower and not the best fishing at all times.
The lowest tank in the system was the deepest and held all the bigguns. A sure bet if you want to eat a fish.

He just hired someone to widen and deepen natural pools in an existing natural drainage system. After the system became flooded, it was stocked with fish. Nature did the rest.

#11 benderislord

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 12:40 AM

well the holes dug on my estate for a smaller starter pond
i will use it for rearing fry and for feeder fish such as shad
pics will be posted as soon as the damned thing fills!
it is 20ftX30ft and 10ft deep

#12 pharmer

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 06:19 PM

I've heard very good things about the "Florida Strain" largemouth. They'll grow to ten pounds and have good disease resistance and do best south of the Mason/Dixon line.

#13 benderislord

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 12:39 PM

yeah they do pharmer they will also do good in deeper ponds/lakes
further north of tenn. is not advised though
up until there they will do good with at least a 40ft deep end




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