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Plantago ( plantains )


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#1 wildedibles

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 02:47 PM

I have 2 kinds growing in my lawn they can be very helpful plants.
The seeds when soaked in water have Mucilage property's. I use the wet dew soaked ripe seeds as a hand moisturizer when I am in the garden I get very dry and cracked hands at times and these help to heal them up very well :)

Here are some other uses for plantains
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago

Here is Plantago major
http://en.wikipedia..../Plantago_major

The flowers, and immature seeds

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They grow in really thick in some areas here is pictures of the whole plant.
Click a few times to see larger pictures :)
I loved playing with these leaves when I was a kid they are really tough my parents would run them over with the cars all the time and it didnt hurt the plant any at all this fascinated me.
The stalks are like celery in a way they have long fibers that are tough that help hold the leaf together.
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Here is how I pull the seeds off pinch and pull when the seeds are fully mature they come off cleanly with a pull.
These are wet seeds they work well to heal the skin.
If you want to collect the seeds to store away for later wait until they are dry on a sunny day pull them off the same way dry in a paper bag fully :)
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Here is a close up of some of the seeds you can see they almost resemble a tomato seed with the muligage coating surrounding them
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and here is Long leaf / narrow leaf plantain
http://en.wikipedia....tago_lanceolata

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I use these seeds the same way as Plantago Major
They are also great for IBS I gave some to a friend that suffered from this she thought they worked better than anything else she had tried :)

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#2 doodaa man

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 06:37 AM

Hello WE !
My lawn is full of them. I would get so pissed trying to get rid of them. Now glad to find they have a useful purpose. But i still want them out of my lawn.:horse:

#3 wildedibles

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 06:47 AM

spread the seeds else where around fence edges and such

They are all threw my grass too

I will not cut my grass untill I collect all the seeds lol I let my weeds grow in my lawn usually going around them when I do cut my lawn people think I am weird but oh well I wont cut my free medicine down ;)

from wikipedia link up there ^

"Plantago major is one of the most abundant and widely distributed medicinal crops in the world. A poultice of the leaves can be applied to wounds, stings, and sores in order to facilitate healing and prevent infection. The active chemical constituents are aucubin (an anti-microbial agent), allantoin (which stimulates cellular growth and tissue regeneration), and mucilage (which reduces pain and discomfort). Plantain has astringent properties, and a tea made from the leaves can be ingested to treat diarrhea and soothe raw internal membranes.
Broadleaf plantain is also a highly nutritious wild edible, that is high in calcium and vitamins A, C, and K. The young, tender leaves can be eaten raw, and the older, stringier leaves can be boiled in stews and eaten."

That reminds me I did use it on a bee sting once and the pain was gone as long as I kept the leaf there took it off the sting returned after an hour or so I could take it off with no pain .. kinda worked like baking soda

with its astringent propertys it can stop bleeding wounds and heal them with the allantoin and mucilage the vitamin k would help stop bleeding too :)

Edited by wildedibles, 12 September 2012 - 06:52 AM.


#4 wildedibles

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 04:06 AM

I had a large area of plantain pop up in the yard :) I left it to grow and it is almost at maturity very neat plant if left alone and not chopped up by the lawn mower ;)

I am going to use some of these big perfect (not bug eaten) leaves for herbal wraps for certain skin or inflammations :) with or without other herbals
- this year I am going to be extra careful to lay them flat as they dry so I can take advantage of the wrap idea ;)

make sure to pour boiling water over the leaf and cover with a lid to keep heat in this should kill anything that has collected on the leaf....

Also just be careful if using on broken skin applying anything in a unclean way may cause more infection on open wounds so be careful and get open wounds checked out at the Doctor to make sure there is not infection in a wound ;)

This is also why I collect perfect bug free leaves if there is a bug hole bite mark and that bug is carrying some pathogen it is now on that bite mark possibly and could contaminate you .....

IMG_2770.JPG The whole bunch of them

IMG_2774.JPG Some beetles on the flower stalks

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One young flower stalk and one almost has seeds ready
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Young and Old leaves

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The older the leaf is the tougher it is
The young leaves are edible probably tender after steamed or boiled ;)
Old leaves would just be all fiber they are stringy like celery :)
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Edited by wildedibles, 31 July 2013 - 04:21 AM.


#5 Deepmeditator

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 05:46 AM

Yay! very cool plants,

Here plantains grow wild too, but their diferent here tho they look just like a bannana tree but the fruit is not sweet, well that actually depends when you pick it , if picked when green not sweet at all, if picked when yellow it gets sweet but not like a bannana.

its more like the vegetable version of the bannana, its used alot in culinary arts , its so yummy when cooked right, if you ever come across these variety I can PM you some good recipes. :)

any ways, cool plants!

Good vibes ~:meditate:

Edited by Deepmeditator, 31 July 2013 - 05:55 AM.


#6 Cindysid

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 07:25 AM

Yay! very cool plants,

Here plantains grow wild too, but their diferent here tho they look just like a bannana tree but the fruit is not sweet, well that actually depends when you pick it , if picked when green not sweet at all, if picked when yellow it gets sweet but not like a bannana.

its more like the vegetable version of the bannana, its used alot in culinary arts , its so yummy when cooked right, if you ever come across these variety I can PM you some good recipes. :)

any ways, cool plants!

Good vibes ~:meditate:

Different plant, same name. The plantains we have down here are of the banana variety.

#7 Deepmeditator

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 07:51 AM

Different plant, same name. The plantains we have down here are of the banana variety.


Oh thats what I thought,

yeah what Im talking bout is more like a tree, yeah just like a banana tree, except you cant eat them raw and you need a knife to peel them,

its actually quite tricky to peel them, tedious I would say :eusa_wall but it can truely make some delicious plates.

Any ways good to know about the healing properties of this other variety,

Thanks ~:meditate:

#8 wildedibles

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Posted 01 August 2013 - 04:55 AM

I have tried them cooked once I think .... I was young and my mom always wanted us to try something new and different ;)

I always wondered why they share a common name but many plants share common names and this is what confuses people sometimes ;)

These plants that I have I have been wondering tho if we could use them to wrap food to cook it
It would hold its shape being tough the way it is they are edible so no toxic things would go into the food...

http://en.wikipedia....lantago_rugelii
This is one that is closely related to Plantago Major
There is a few differences but they look similar worth looking into what one I have...hum...:)
P. rugelii is native to Americas where P. Major is native to Europe
but P. Major has been spread by settlers all over the world by accident or on purpose ;)
There are probably mixes of these 2 now in North America would be my guess

I am going to take a look to see the differences between the stuff that is growing in my yard compared to the ones growing in the woods ... There are differences now because of the different places it is growing my yard being hot dry very compacted ground no cover or shade
where the ones in the woods gets shaded by other plants and stays much more delicate compared to the tuff leaves I get ;)

I am going to try and cook food in these leaves I have been watching other people around the world cook in leaves and wow the food is moist fresh flavorful ;) can't wait to try this :)

Interesting note these like to grow in Alkali soils or with Dolomite
...there was also a mention that it may help with Gout I know topically applied to bee sting the pain disappears if the leaf is on it and sometimes you can feel it pulling stuff out like a stinger....

Edited by wildedibles, 01 August 2013 - 06:07 AM.


#9 Thulsa_Doom

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Posted 01 August 2013 - 08:06 AM

This has been an excellent source of information. Thank you.
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