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Communal Woodlover Grow log


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#1981 Arathu

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 12:52 PM

Wharfrat ... harvest them now !!!  and pat yourself on the back for a job well done. Everyone else to. This thread single-handily got more results than years of random posts! Way to go. Waylitjim is proud I'm sure.

So I'm sitting here reading this gargantuan thread of awesomeness.............with my spine tingling as I look at what you all have done. Holy frigging standing work! Waylitjim has to be strutting around like a proud papa rooster with all his chicks...............and shrooms showing incredible results! 

A


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#1982 Heirloom Spores

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 02:44 PM

Arathru what kind of funding do you need ?  I think we can raise the funding.
 

I live in Iowa and grew PS Cyansens, I cannot grow others here so far.

Long thread  hope it goes fast. Welcome Back.

Ararthu you are the Master Grower who started this thread, your teaching thought more than can be counted.

 


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#1983 Arathu

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 01:05 AM

Arathru what kind of funding do you need ?  I think we can raise the funding.
 

I live in Iowa and grew PS Cyansens, I cannot grow others here so far.

Long thread  hope it goes fast. Welcome Back.

Ararthu you are the Master Grower who started this thread, your teaching thought more than can be counted.

 

Dreaming out loud............... of a different world than we currently have right now. :tinfoil: I'm a vet so I like the idea of helping veterans.........


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#1984 Arathu

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 12:12 PM

Arathu babbling like a dilated pupil fool around the fire........................cant tell if my eyes are open or closed..........it all looks the same............looking through the other eye's.

 

Keep in mind I'm just another bozo too.......so while we might be on same bus I could wind up sitting in the back with some of you smoking a bowl and wonder who is driving.........hahahahaha

In a session around my fire pit, which is located at the center of a stone circle that I built for this purpose, I was deeply looking for answers to troubles I was experiencing with contamination (my own cubie days). I was shocked (my big old intellectual ego got smacked down) at the "answers". The best message I finally got was "see what we do? just copy us". For example, now I try and think/feel (note: that's left brain and right brain integrated) like the mycelium and the ecosystem. These organisms, like all life, must have an energy source in the way of food and ample water to grow and develop. So in the flavor of this thread I see that the wood-loving species of interest to many folks have adapted-to/developed-in riparian environments. If you can, I suggest to go and meditate, observe, and make notes right there in the environment itself. (side note: mosquito's and ticks LOVE these environments so prepare yourself however you see fit) These environments are violent places of flooding, land slipping, and experience great season to season changes in shape and content. (A useful visualization might be to picture a small stream that experiences heavy destructive flash flooding)

 

Annuals and perennials (Japanese Knotweed is a really good example of this and definitely found in very large quantities in the riparian environment here) fall down and provide large amounts of relatively soft and easily colonized material (spawn perhaps). What happens there? In a flood it gets mixed with the tree branches, leaves, moss, soils, and everything else including multiple species of fungi that's being ground up in one of mother nature's blenders. So there is this violent slurry of everything necessary to grow moving down the valley. When a bend or other obstacle is reached and the water makes a turn it looses it's ability to carry heavier materials and they tend to get deposited in piles. Then the flood goes away and the water goes back to the bottom of the valley. This happens repeatedly over the winter and spring (not so much summer but it does occur) resulting in layers of soft lignin rich materials, hard lignin rich materials, soils of many types, and etc. forming beds/heaps knocked up with spores and mycelium slurry along the water way as gravity and hydrodynamics saw fit. Sound familiar? I submit that is exactly what we are attempting to emulate regardless of the particular wood-loving species. (obviously other species have their own particulars and it pays to study them in their native places. IMHO Waylit and others saw this either consciously or unconsciously and thus the layered approach to bed making (starting at page 1 of this thread which IS COPIED from the vaults and Waylit's massive thread library) resulted.

 

Sitting amongst them especially after eating them is incredible. Of course I might just be really freaking wyrd........................ 

 

Observe nature and copy Her.....................indeed IMHO

 

small_GEDC9397.jpg

Riparian in a mono-tub perhaps?

 

small_GEDC9398.jpg

What does it look, smell, and feel like along a natural stream?

 

small_GEDC9403.jpg

Looks like breakfast, lunch, and dinner from the mushrooms' eye's IMHO

 

 

Death is nothing to fear, it is the return of the building blocks necessary for new life, you and I owe our flesh and bones to the dirt since we only borrowed them for a short while.

 

 

 

 


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#1985 Heirloom Spores

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 02:31 PM

I send good vibes to your psychedelic outreach program. Psychedelics have a huge potential.

I am glad to say that MAPS expects MMDA to be available  by prescription in 3 years.

There is a huge potential for Psilocybin.


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#1986 Arathu

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 01:31 PM

I send good vibes to your psychedelic outreach program. Psychedelics have a huge potential.

I am glad to say that MAPS expects MMDA to be available  by prescription in 3 years.

There is a huge potential for Psilocybin.

Thank you HS...........there is deep healing needed in our communities and in our world.


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#1987 moricz

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 03:57 AM

Hey guys, the programing has some success.

 

As you may know already, I played with a flowerpot of allenii. When they fruited and harvested then they got a big dunking, and placed a tinfoil onto the top with some holes, kept at 18-22 C°. After a month or so I opened, and placed into 12-16 C° then misted maybe twice a week, gently. When pins appeared waited a week to get more developped, then placed into my cellar.

 

Results:

 

IMG_7255.jpg IMG_7268.jpg IMG_7269.jpg

 

Cyans are tired :)

 

As much as subaeruginosa, but they will produce a second flush I hope.

IMG_7256.jpg IMG_7272.jpg

 

Peace


Edited by moricz, 11 January 2017 - 04:02 AM.

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#1988 happy4nic8r

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 05:22 AM

Interesting what you say Arathu about the various beds of natural composted dead plants and how they look and smell different. I was out in a huge rainstorm for 3 days watching different shrooms pop up all over the place.

 

Checking out what they chose to grow in, how they spread, and especially how they interwove their grows in some cases.

 

This in preparation for introducing my Oregon cyans to the most likely spots on my new property in the Sierra foothills.

 

No shortage of mushrooms here, just different vegetation. No ferns, which were their favorite shade in Oregon. 

 

Moricz, nice work. I never got mine to grow in lab, but had the timing wrong. When I got the timing down, I had no lab.


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#1989 Arathu

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 01:16 PM

Nice work moricz, I like the flower pot approach it seems easily worked with and managed. There are magic spores blowing on the winds around the world..............beautiful! 

 

4nic8r I've learned some neat tricks from observations just like that. Smell and the general feel of things like dark, damp, mushroomy kind of spots..........there are some species I've learned to hunt using my sense of smell. IME the more in touch we become with the biosphere the better it goes. Congrats on that property! :biggrin:  


Edited by Arathu, 11 January 2017 - 08:12 PM.

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#1990 Viridis420

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 01:48 PM

Great to see you returned Arathu ;) We were all wondering when you'd return home.

I'm busy working on starting new cultures. I'll post as they progress further along...



#1991 Opalguy

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 02:00 PM

You guys have helped me so much already. Thanks! My next conundrum is on spore germination temps for woodlovers (cyanescens, azurescens and subaeriginosa). I have heard some say to germinate them cool to cold.....and some are germinating them warmish (70-80F). Where is there a discussion of this as I am going back to agar and want to benefit from the knowledge of others. I need to isolate some genetics and to do that I need a strong start. My azures are pretty contaminated and I would like the perfect temp for the spores to germ strong and then I will begin to isolate away the contams. Point me in the right direction. When I go directly to grain, I hit as close to 60F as I can. This also seems ideal for my contam of choice.........Let me know! I am excited to try to clean up this mess.



#1992 Arathu

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 02:57 PM

Thanks Viridis...............it's good to be home and see all of you happily at it. :biggrin:

 

Opalguy Not sure where to point you on this one so I'll have to do some searches myself.........In the mean time, I do my agar work in front of a flow hood with temps as cool as possible and germination/spawn growth on plates at 70F or a little cooler in an incubator. Cooler goes slower and warmer gets all kinds of interesting growths on plates. Isolation can sometimes prove to be quite a pain in the rear end but it works very well this way for me. For that reason I try to get an isolate (meaning the isolation work is completed to my satisfaction and it's time to generate spawn) onto wood as soon as possible and personally I find shattered and crumbled pithy plant stems and grass roots preferable to grains for woodlover spawn creation. It's also way cheaper (like free) than buying and preparing grains. Finding contamination vectors can prove difficult. I have found myself to be the culprit most of the time. It is a numbers game and if the target growth gets the upper hand then it usually wins. Where the target isolated growth is found gets transferred successively from jar to jar until clean (the top of the agar is then allowed to fully colonize clean), then sterile wood chips added right on top of the colonized agar. Once that is complete open air transfers are a breeze.........pun intended.........  :rolleyes: 

 

So I use a wood tea enhanced agar (tea made from simmering the intended fruiting substrate in water) and then using that water to create the agar to start the process. The intention there being to condition the fungi from the very outset of life to eat the target (gotta take advantage of the locally available and sustainable food sources right). 

 

I don't know if that's helpful or not.............
 

A


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#1993 Arathu

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 03:58 PM

I post a link to this paper not for data but technique...........an FYI look at the study done by others  as related to germination of spores vs temperature.......here

 

http://www.academicj...df/007D94353244

 

Now you know I'm whipping up an experiment in the background too................... (not directly a temperature vs germination rate) Did I mention needing a research grant...........hahahahahaha

 

No one pays for pure academics nor do I expect that they will...............something about ROI and board members............this is what I think of corporate :chucks: 



#1994 Arathu

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 06:41 PM

It's no secret that I don't like messing with grains. I hate the damned green bastard (not that I should hate anything as it too has it's place in this world) So if I don't have to fool with that then I don't. In this experiment I am expanding upon a previous test. The last two photo's show an example of the results of spores knocked straight to sterilized hardwood sawdust tests. In this I'll try straight to pithy stems. It should be interesting to see what happens.

 

small_GEDC9421.jpg

Local pithy stemmed plants gathered standing upright in the wild today

 

 

small_GEDC9424.jpg

Chopped and smashed by hand for 24 hour soak (they are soaking now and will be thoroughly drained remembering field capacity moisture content from mycology 101)

Then sterilization (PC at 15 psi for > 30 minutes)

 

 

small_GEDC9425.jpg

Mason jars, poor mans pitri, RULE............

 

 

small_GEDC9426.jpg

Spores that were sprinkled/scraped with sterile scalpel directly onto sterilized hardwood sawdust in still air box germinated and grew

 

small_GEDC9429.jpg

The substrate is colonized and the mycelium went crazy, running up the sides of the jar, looking for more to eat. No grains, no flours, no contaminating nutrient enhancements.....nothing but wood... :bat:

 

Hahahahahahaha...............he said wood.......

 

 

I'll add more tomorrow after I drain and then PC these 5 jars.............

 

 

 

 

 


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#1995 Opalguy

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 01:12 AM

Thanks Viridis...............it's good to be home and see all of you happily at it. :biggrin:

 

Opalguy Not sure where to point you on this one so I'll have to do some searches myself.........In the mean time, I do my agar work in front of a flow hood with temps as cool as possible and germination/spawn growth on plates at 70F or a little cooler in an incubator. Cooler goes slower and warmer gets all kinds of interesting growths on plates. Isolation can sometimes prove to be quite a pain in the rear end but it works very well this way for me. For that reason I try to get an isolate (meaning the isolation work is completed to my satisfaction and it's time to generate spawn) onto wood as soon as possible and personally I find shattered and crumbled pithy plant stems and grass roots preferable to grains for woodlover spawn creation. It's also way cheaper (like free) than buying and preparing grains. Finding contamination vectors can prove difficult. I have found myself to be the culprit most of the time. It is a numbers game and if the target growth gets the upper hand then it usually wins. Where the target isolated growth is found gets transferred successively from jar to jar until clean (the top of the agar is then allowed to fully colonize clean), then sterile wood chips added right on top of the colonized agar. Once that is complete open air transfers are a breeze.........pun intended.........  :rolleyes:

 

So I use a wood tea enhanced agar (tea made from simmering the intended fruiting substrate in water) and then using that water to create the agar to start the process. The intention there being to condition the fungi from the very outset of life to eat the target (gotta take advantage of the locally available and sustainable food sources right). 

 

I don't know if that's helpful or not.............
 

A

Quite helpful actually. You pointed me towards wood tea to make the agar,so to condition the mycelium. Makes great sense. I will create some agar plates tomorrow and incubate them at 70ish. I know my spores are good,as I get germination and growth.....its just the tams overcome the growth. I really want the outdoor woodlover beds.....it is just a quest at this point. I want to have a bed of as many different woodlovers as possible and maintain the culture in perpetuity. Will put this to good use. Thanks.


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#1996 Opalguy

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 01:29 AM

In your opinion, is there a woodlover that is the easiest to start and grow? It appears that to you they are all equally easy, but if you had to choose the easiest what would it be? I currently have cyanescens, subaeriginosa, and azurescens. I am looking for ovoids, alenii and cyanofriscosa. I think if I get these going and moved outside,I will be a happy camper. Fruiting would be awesome......but just to see the mycelium bulking up would be rather fulfilling. Let me know....I want to make these work.



#1997 moricz

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 04:26 AM

Just for Opalguy, I have 3 dish of Ovoid spores

one dish on 24 C

one on 16-18 C

one on 10-13 C

 

I think I saw something on the 24 C germinating at sporedrop site, they are 4 days old, others has nothing.

 

Also Inoculated 4 lazy prepped grains, 2 on 24, 1 on 16-18, and one on 10-13 nothing visible.

 

With woodlovers I usually get 5 -7 days at 20-24 C

 

Time will tell.

 

Peace


Edited by moricz, 12 January 2017 - 07:23 AM.

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#1998 Arathu

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 08:08 AM

In your opinion, is there a woodlover that is the easiest to start and grow? It appears that to you they are all equally easy, but if you had to choose the easiest what would it be? I currently have cyanescens, subaeriginosa, and azurescens. I am looking for ovoids, alenii and cyanofriscosa. I think if I get these going and moved outside,I will be a happy camper. Fruiting would be awesome......but just to see the mycelium bulking up would be rather fulfilling. Let me know....I want to make these work.

In my opinion isolating extremely aggressive rhizomorphic mycelium of the target species while on agar, watch the plates and look for fast rhizomes, take the tips to new plates, repeat until satisfied, is the way to start......once a single plate of mycelium with the desired characteristics is isolated from contaminants it can be expanded......it's not about easiest it's about understanding the organism you are working with...IMHO...... They have a life, a presence, and even an attitude..............  :cool:  Feeding them what they want to eat, in the correct environment, will result in.................them liking YOU...........By far it is my personal opinion that the local indigenous woodlover specie(s) is the easiest to start and grow in any given geographic location.........  :biggrin: Assuming there is one............


Edited by Arathu, 12 January 2017 - 08:22 AM.

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#1999 mjroom

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 08:33 AM

Hey guys, the programing has some success.

 

As you may know already, I played with a flowerpot of allenii. When they fruited and harvested then they got a big dunking, and placed a tinfoil onto the top with some holes, kept at 18-22 C°. After a month or so I opened, and placed into 12-16 C° then misted maybe twice a week, gently. When pins appeared waited a week to get more developped, then placed into my cellar.

 

Results:

 

attachicon.gifIMG_7255.jpgattachicon.gifIMG_7268.jpgattachicon.gifIMG_7269.jpg

 

Cyans are tired :)

 

As much as subaeruginosa, but they will produce a second flush I hope.

attachicon.gifIMG_7256.jpgattachicon.gifIMG_7272.jpg

 

Peace

Moricz: what is the composition of the pot soil that you use? I am surprised the mushroom has enough lignin and cellulose to fruit so well. Thanks mjroom.


Edited by mjroom, 12 January 2017 - 08:37 AM.

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#2000 Opalguy

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 09:34 AM

Just for Opalguy, I have 3 dish of Ovoid spores

one dish on 24 C

one on 16-18 C

one on 10-13 C

 

I think I saw something on the 24 C germinating at sporedrop site, they are 4 days old, others has nothing.

 

Also Inoculated 4 lazy prepped grains, 2 on 24, 1 on 16-18, and one on 10-13 nothing visible.

 

With woodlovers I usually get 5 -7 days at 20-24 C

 

Time will tell.

 

Peace

Nice, that is going to be really helpful! Thanks. I did find an ovoid print......somewhere.  I expended some treasure for it, but that is the closest indigenous woodlover to my neck of the woods. They will eventually allow me to succeed, will take time I am sure. Thanks again and that is exactly the info I was looking for! H/T


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