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Communal Woodlover Grow log


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#2881 Arathu

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Posted 09 July 2017 - 10:55 PM

Thanks guys................. :biggrin:

 

 

BTW, I will be starting Ovoids and Subs from spores, what would you pros think is the best way to start these grows?

 

It is my opinion that spores should be germinated on agar that contains a small amount of additives from the intended fruiting substrate(s). For example If one is going to use Hickory chips to make the wood chip spawn then a tea is made from the chips and that water is the water used to make the agar with. From there isolation from contaminants is performed by successive transfers of mycelium to additional plates and at the same time one also seeks to grab aggressive rhizome mycelial growth. Ultimately you're looking for isolating a fruiting strain of the species through this work. This takes practice and can explain why some beds may not fruit, or may fruit poorly. After isolation plates are grown out until fully colonized, note: It is quite interesting sometimes to see mushrooms fruiting from the agar (and certainly that is a very desirable thing). But aggressive rhizome mycelium is what you want to expand by transferring agar wedges to sterilized grain spawn. From there wood chip spawn is made followed by layered beds. This thread, and many others here at Topia especially in the vaults, shows those things and the results from following them.

 

Of course that is not the only way to do it...................but it is tried and true and like PF TEK for beginning cubes I recommend following the lead of those that came before me, because that's what I did and it works. From there you have success, confidence, and you have built a significant skill set in mycology which will allow you to take it as far as you like............ 

 

All of these woodlovers can be treated very similarly and learning the fruiting triggers becomes the trick. The time frames are way longer than dung lovers and other species but the rewards are also that much better, particularly for folks in the northern climates, but anywhere that cold weather happens fruiting can potentially be accomplished too...IMHO....

 


Edited by Arathu, 09 July 2017 - 11:18 PM.

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#2882 Arathu

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 10:27 PM

This thread is epic!

Dig that......I'm re-reading the entire thing.........I'm on page 47.........ALL OF YOU ROCK!

I hope that waylitjim has seen this and I hope he has a week or so to read it all............hahahahaha

 

This thread is EPIC because of ALL OF YOU!

 

A


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#2883 meyer

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 07:21 AM

Can someone please give me the 411 on planting for a select few woodies? Ideally, there is a nice pdf out there that exists and can be found and posted, in lieu of my dream request, can I get the skinny on planting for the following:

Ps Cyan
Ps Azures
Oviods
Ps Subs

I would really like to know when the timeline is for each for the following questions:

1. When is the latest I can start my grow outdoors to get any fruits this year for the Cyans and the Azures; what about for spring for the Subs and the Oviods?
2, What is the optimal timing for the same question above?
3. If I miss the last deadline for any of the above listed in #1, when should I try to plant after the last go date and work on setting myself up for the following season
4, As I've mentioned before, I have several tubs of Azures and Cyan's, getting ready to start my Ovoids and Subs, what is the optimal bed size? Note, from what I have 'read, I plan to dig a 6" hole and line it with cardboard and add 8 to 12 inches to whatever the optimal size that is provided to me, plus to throw a layer of wood chips done first and then cover my removed cube of awesome wood myc and then fill in the 8 to 12 inches with workshops, etc., as well as cover the top with a layer of wood chips.

Am I missing any other good questions? I'm aware of the watering and the desire to creat e microcomputers with grass, plant life, Mary's cut stalks and just good ole fashion existing wood materials... is there anything else I should make myself aware life of?

Thank you to everyone in advance!

#2884 mjroom

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 08:35 AM

Here you go. You can adjust the grow for any wood of preference depending upon what you want to grow. mjroom.

 

 

http://www.magic-mus...-azurescens.pdf


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#2885 Arathu

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 08:35 PM

Here you go. You can adjust the grow for any wood of preference depending upon what you want to grow. mjroom.

 

 

http://www.magic-mus...-azurescens.pdf

This is a good general paper to start with for understanding the woodlover growth plan....

 

The leap from agar to wood chips can be tricky and also frustrating due to the speeds involved.......sterilized chainsaw dust is easier but remember any substrate that is sterilized must be treated as such.......

 

This process is a traditional methodology for woodlover, of all kinds, propagation and when executed correctly is very reliable...........

 

Germination or clone on agar-->sterilized grain master-->sterilized grain expansion-->pasteurized wood chip (of various kinds) spawn-->pasteurized layered wood chip bed for fruiting

 

The details of each step in that process vary some, not a whole lot, depending on materials available and species. Still one must master the skills and buy/create the tools involved for each step along the way.........

 

 

 

You can match the above to this graphic from GGMM, Stamets, as always I highly recommend buying this book and studying it vigorously and frequently....


mushroom cultivation.png

 

 

 

I would really like to know when the timeline is for each for the following questions:

The best way to do this is to start taking notes for your geography by empirical means for the species you are talking about......it's difficult for someone else to give you these answers

1. When is the latest I can start my grow outdoors to get any fruits this year for the Cyans and the Azures; what about for spring for the Subs and the Oviods? The earlier you make beds in the year the higher the probability that it will fruit in that given year. It is MUCH MORE likely that the following year will produce fruits IF the bed is maintained and kept in good growing conditions.
2, What is the optimal timing for the same question above? With a very healthy amount of mature spawn (that has been 100% colonized and munching away for some months) a bed of cyans made in the spring has a good chance of making some fruits in the fall. So from after thaw, say May 1st, until expected fruits sometime in October or November....
3. If I miss the last deadline for any of the above listed in #1, when should I try to plant after the last go date and work on setting myself up for the following season Get fall fruiting woodlovers in the fruiting bed well before fall with the intent of picking the following fall. Get spring fruiting woodlovers in the ground before freeze up with the intent of picking two springs ahead. It is my opinion that a solid year, and sometime more, should be allowed for reasonable development of a solid thick layered woodlover bed. And that these should be the initial focus of a first time growers of woodlover mushrooms. After that is done one may play with various experiments and otherwise understanding that you're blazing ground for your location. Tubs, pots, trays, bags, small beds, whole burlap bags of chips and etc. etc.......for example.    
4, As I've mentioned before, I have several tubs of Azures and Cyan's, getting ready to start my Ovoids and Subs, what is the optimal bed size? The optimal bed size depends on the amount of solid spawn you have generated and the method you intend to use, island effect, layered, or mixed, to spawn the bed. The more fully colonized and mature spawn in a bed the better. Soils mixed in with the substrates and layers are helpful probably because of bacteria. I like 4 to 6, (1 inch deep) layers of spawn with a 1 inch deep layer of new wood, chainsaw dust, saw dust, wood chunks, branches, woody stems, and etc between those colonized spawn layers (SEE PAGE 1 of the thread)  Note, from what I have 'read, I plan to dig a 6" hole and line it with cardboard and add 8 to 12 inches to whatever the optimal size that is provided to me, plus to throw a layer of wood chips done first and then cover my removed cube of awesome wood myc and then fill in the 8 to 12 inches with workshops, etc., as well as cover the top with a layer of wood chips.

 

As a rule of thumb I plan on NOT seeing fruits until the following year. As a rule of thumb I observe that the species in question will drop it's spores in the season it fruits and I assume that those spores will germinate shortly there after. I assume it is this new mycelium that fruits the following year but that is not necessarily so as a well established deep layered bed with an existing fruiting mat will definitely fruit again the following year if the conditions for it's life remain there..................when I do see fruits the first year I'm fucking silly happy about it and thank the Gods and Goddesses for being generous.......YES I've had beds and tubs fruit first year..........but I NEVER count on it and I NEVER discount a bed or tub/pot because it did not fruit the first year....two years is not uncommon. 

 

IMHO.....and IME.

 


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#2886 Arathu

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 09:46 PM

Additionally do not discount consideration of the magical luck, intuitive knowledge, hard won experiential skills of picking the right chunk of aggressive rhizomorphic mycelium from agar plates to grow out and fruit. Remember Stamets speaks specifically to this task very early in the mycological work. Choosing a fruiting strain. He says that it is extremely important when trying to isolate a maitake for production. I'm assuming the same or similar goes for other species don't you think?  

 

Some strains may never fruit, some fruit lightly, some fruit in massive clusters, some fruit one big monster, and some fruit deformed monsters, some lay out a canopy that will freak you out....and some do ?????? Given the time frames involved with woodlover mushrooms it is probably a good idea to invest time and effort into that skill set too. Aggressive rhizomorphic characteristics are apparently desirable...............when I know more than that I'm going to write a book................. :biggrin:

 

small_GEDC1906.jpg

 

Which one is it???????

 

A


Edited by Arathu, 12 July 2017 - 09:47 PM.





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