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Communal Woodlover Grow log


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#3561 Zwapa

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Posted 30 October 2018 - 11:57 AM

white stems , for me the signal to be grateful ;)

cyans, just lovely



#3562 Seeker2be

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Posted 30 October 2018 - 06:23 PM

so tiny.  I didn't expect that.   Best way to preserve them other than just drying?



#3563 Ferather

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Posted 03 November 2018 - 12:37 PM

T-Gel test (plain, no flour):
 
Both tests where assembled 30/10/18. I'm using wooden toothpicks, cut down, and cooked in 10% sucrose water.
I'm using extra tubs to reduce temperature fluctuations, and general contamination chances.
 
A (Left): Serbica, dry spores (from a print), collected on the tip of the peg.
B (Right): Cubensis, already germinated, as above, on WL-Tek.
 
IMG_20181030_195002.jpg IMG_20181030_195159.jpg
IMG_20181030_195047.jpg IMG_20181030_195200.jpg
 
----
 
Potential outcomes (Cubensis):
 
Decay occurs - This would make cubensis lignicolous (enough). However it's high pH and nitrogen preference likely makes it niche.
Nothing - This would make cubensis non-lignicolous. It's reliant on trace soluble carbon, higher pH and nitrogen.
--
4 days later the Cubensis sample has adapted and started growing out.
 
 
Serbica:
 
Assessing germination and time scale.
 
----
 
Attached File  Ferather's Journal.zip   4.66MB   15 downloads

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#3564 Sicshroom

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Posted 19 November 2018 - 02:42 PM

Hello all hoping to get a tip for isolating growth onto agar from an outdoor bed. I commonly use bleach water in a 10:1 ratio for cleaning my glove box would it be better to use this solution or iodine tincture to clean up a few good pieces for an agar isolate

#3565 425nm

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 01:14 AM

Hello all hoping to get a tip for isolating growth onto agar from an outdoor bed. I commonly use bleach water in a 10:1 ratio for cleaning my glove box would it be better to use this solution or iodine tincture to clean up a few good pieces for an agar isolate

Sorry, you're looking to clean your glove box or sterilize the exterior of some tissue you wish to clone?
When I've cloned wild cyans I've had pretty good luck tearing a stipe in half and pulling a chunk out of the center. No dipping solution necessary. If you're aseptic technique is good and you've got a reasonably meaty stipe to work with should be fine.


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#3566 425nm

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 01:19 AM

IMG 20181119 213908
 
The first fruiting of my Psilocybe serbica bed! Not really anything to brag about yield-wise but none the less validating. I honestly cannot remember when I set that bed up. At least a year ago but it could have been two years ago. Alas, all I had was Scotts nature mulch available to me at the time which probs accounts for the poor yield. Hopefully soon I can find a tastier source of wood for them.
 
IMG 20181119 214610
 
Very interesting morphology in contrast with the cyans that grow wild here.
 
IMG 20181119 214849
 
I'll nab whatever prints these meager few caps will yield.

 

 


Edited by 425nm, 20 November 2018 - 01:19 AM.

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#3567 Sicshroom

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 08:19 AM

It's all good, I clean my glove box Everytime I use it. I'm wishing I had fruits to close but it's just a bed that I planted and what I kept in cold storage that I'm trying to go back to square one with. I took a sample from my bed and have it expanding nicely and I want to isolate a few piece and get them cleaned up on agar and grow out a few(6or 8) pints and restart. Thank you for you advice

#3568 Turdly81

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 01:22 PM

The first fruiting of my Psilocybe serbica bed! Not really anything to brag about yield-wise but none the less validating. I honestly cannot remember when I set that bed up. At least a year ago but it could have been two years ago. Alas, all I had was Scotts nature mulch available to me at the time which probs accounts for the poor yield. Hopefully soon I can find a tastier source of wood for them.




Very interesting morphology in contrast with the cyans that grow wild here.




I'll nab whatever prints these meager few caps will yield.

Are those the wavy cap ones?

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#3569 425nm

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 02:29 PM

 

The first fruiting of my Psilocybe serbica bed! Not really anything to brag about yield-wise but none the less validating. I honestly cannot remember when I set that bed up. At least a year ago but it could have been two years ago. Alas, all I had was Scotts nature mulch available to me at the time which probs accounts for the poor yield. Hopefully soon I can find a tastier source of wood for them.




Very interesting morphology in contrast with the cyans that grow wild here.




I'll nab whatever prints these meager few caps will yield.
 

Are those the wavy cap ones?

Sent from my LG-LS997 using Tapatalk

 

P. serbica is a European species that is similar to Psilocybe cyanescens (wavy caps, caramel caps, etc). I don't think the P. serbica consistently have a wavy cap like P. cyanescens does. I do believe cyans grow in some parts of Europe as well as NA where as serbica is restricted to Europe. These are cyans:

IMG 20181103 171040
 
IMG 20181103 172029
 
IMG 20181105 223004

 

Not great reference photos. I really should do a better job of thoroughly photographing things. Most of my cyan picking has been at night lately.



#3570 Turdly81

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 02:36 PM

No its great :) thank you.

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#3571 Deleena24

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Posted 21 November 2018 - 12:01 AM

I just transferred 1lb of Azure Hammond strain on corn to 5lb supplemented sawdust. Wish me luck.

#3572 Ferather

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Posted 26 November 2018 - 03:41 PM


Some data on beneficial archaea and bacteria (in the wild), with wood or woody products.
 
----
 
 
----
 
 
 
Archaea, play roles in both the carbon and nitrogen cycle:
 
 
----
 
 
----
 
Summer oyster benefiting from nitrogen fixating blue-green algae.
Fruiting from nitrogen deficient cotton wood, @ 7°C.
 
IMG_20170208_154741.jpg
IMG_20170208_154801.jpg

 



#3573 Ferather

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Posted 26 November 2018 - 04:59 PM

I think I may have another angle for white rot and brown rot fungi.
 
In order for spores to germinate and grow well on cellulose, it must have an easier to decay carbon source.
So the 'general' rule is, to germinate on wood, the phenols must be targeted via various enzymes.
 
----
 
There are a few methods of decay I can think of, using different enzymes and reactions:
 
Partial decay (external) > absorption > further decay (internal).
Complete decay, or almost (external) > absorption.
Partial decay (external) > absorption.
 
If an organism cannot target the phenols, pre-decay will likely be needed.
 
----
 
White rot:
 
My example is Tarragon oyster, it absorbs the phenols, later oxidizing them.
Internal oxidation occurs in the areas of highest O2 (oxygen).
 
Absorption causes the plate to fade to just agar.
 
IMG_20180125_124225.jpg IMG_20180124_125441-B.jpg
 
 
Brown rot:
 
My example is Cubensis, no phenol absorption, it decays them externally.
Decay of the tea phenols causes them to turn brown-black.
 
IMG_20181113_222310_E.jpg IMG_20181122_133646.jpg
 
----
 
Normally Tarragon oyster will be penetrating wood, producing low O2 conditions.
By default it should be up taking materials to high oxygen areas.
 
----
 
Additional notes:
 
Full utilization of phenols (less browning, more fading) may occur when the base components are more spendable.
If more of the carbon is spent, with macro-micro nutrients, less carbon waste would be produced.
 
Some mycelium may only produce enzymes and reactions that achieve partial decay.
 
----
 
External data:
 
 


#3574 orangutan

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 12:40 AM

These are growing out of wood chips and soil.  Bay Area, California.  What do you all think?

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#3575 Seeker2be

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 12:29 AM

Look like sulfur tufts  Hypholoma fasiculare but could be capnoides.  It depends on bitter taste and yellow green gills (fasiculare)  smokey gills and no bitter taste capnoides.  Capnoides grows on dead fir and Fasiculare on hard wood. caps or pileus looks similar.  They both have purple spores but don't bruise blue so not actives. IME

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Edited by Seeker2be, 08 January 2019 - 12:52 AM.

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#3576 Ferather

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 02:12 PM

Exports from another forum (paper pellets):
 
----
 
If you get the right content, there should be no condensate, and it should be loose.
I don't go over 75% water content, I prefer 70-72% for my paper pellets.
 
IMG_20170204_212054.jpg IMG_20170215_175545.jpg
 
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Paper pellets and wood pellets vary, I think my paper pellets have a clay filler, which increases absorbency.
I also know that my paper pellets contain trace CaCO3, from when the original paper is made.
 
Paper pellets also have an 'open' structure, not solid. Imagine a 3D spider web, in a shape of a ball.
 
When I make WL-Tek I start with 4x dry weight as water, and microwave cook it (steam) down to 3x (75%).
The conversion of absorbed water to steam pushes out the structure of the paper (more volume).
 
Increasing the volume increases the total holding ability of the paper pellets.
Once microwave inflated, the paper or mix can be assembled.
 
IMG_20170203_154225.jpg
IMG_20170204_161001.jpg
 
 
Notes: 
 
After hydration and steaming, the total volume increases to 10x, 25g needs 250ml, 125g needs 1250ml.
If you do the same with wood pellets, they tend to just breakdown to a powder or mush.
The open structure will bind small particles, and allow free growth-movement.
 
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I suggest making small amounts, for example 25g, and test water holding.
 
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Various paper pellet brands-types will add baking soda (sodium) or other components.
 
High amounts of magnesium or sodium will inhibit growth or cause issues.
Use chemical and additive free pellets, the inks are organic.
 
IMG_20170420_162701.jpg IMG_20160907_224246.jpg
 
====
 
Decided to post this extra basic fruiting setup for 400ml round deli containers.
 
Substrate: 25g paper pellets + 12.5g wood pellets (66/33) - plain.
 
----
 
The 400ml container in sat in a cereal bowl, which is filled with clean water, the bowl is in a carrier bag.
I added a plate to the outside, this allows me to move the setup around, if it's required.
 
No misting is needed until the bag is opened out at later fruiting stages.
 
IMG_20190106_113803.jpg IMG_20190106_113949.jpg IMG_20190106_113959.jpg
 
----
 
Ideal for testing medias and enrichment, saves money.
 
====
 
Substrate test: Azure wood spawn to 25g paper pellets, 12.5g wood pellets (66-33, 37.5g).
Grow-up style (wood spawn at the bottom), 72% water, enriched (WL-Tek).
 
IMG_20190108_182249.jpg IMG_20190108_182341.jpg IMG_20190108_182402.jpg

Edited by Ferather, 08 January 2019 - 02:36 PM.


#3577 Ferather

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 09:06 AM

The larger pieces of wood spawn have recovered the fastest (probably less spent and contain more nutrients).
20 hours, not bad for low nutrient wood (50% carbon, 0.1% nitrogen). Visible blonding (white-rot).
 
IMG_20190109_125207.jpg IMG_20190109_125308.jpg IMG_20190109_125403.jpg IMG_20190109_125442.jpg
 
Ignore the discoloured surface reflection at the bottom.

Edited by Ferather, 09 January 2019 - 09:10 AM.


#3578 Ferather

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 03:39 PM

The Azure spawn is working, but slowly in comparison to grain. Semi expected as paper pellets are acid free (no phenols).
In addition, as mentioned, the wood is not very nutritional in terms of non carbon macro-micro nutrients.
 
IMG_20190110_201716.jpg IMG_20190110_201858.jpg IMG_20190110_202005.jpg IMG_20190110_202241.jpg
 
Growth has gone from tomentose to thick and linear.


#3579 Seeker2be

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 11:02 PM

A brilliant grasp of the obvious and a note to self reminding one to be persistent not stubborn.  I reviewed this thread again to see if I could do a better job with my efforts, be efficient and more scientific instead of just dumb luck stumbling around..  As Stamets sez: Failure the price of tuition that one has to pay for knowledge gained.  Heirloom's note from the not to distant past reminded us to read the first 2 pages of this blog.  I did again.  The sage advice from Hyphenation of the layering for the wood lovers gave me some thought of the whys and wherefores.  The race between colonization and contamination is stalled in favor of colonization by the pasteurized potting soil, then the cardboard, then the pasteurized or sterilized wood chips then the naive colonized wood chips (not yet stimulated for epigenesis or the enzymatic library of the mycelium to ward off bacteria,fungi, and mold) then the straw, then the pasteurized soil and repeat layers all give the mycelium a chance to build its defenses against contamination.  Its intuitive for sure but for some like me who have to know why see the value of this method instead of just "ill do it my own way.  This is a hobby of persistence but not stubbornness.  Sometimes we need a thump on the head to see the light.  Thank you all for the light that you all have shown on this effort. Moving forward


Edited by Seeker2be, 11 January 2019 - 11:05 PM.


#3580 Ferather

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 10:23 AM

I'm stubborn when it comes to making grain spawn, TBH I hate starch, but unfortunately it works so well as a starter resource for growth.

 

Some exports:

 

====

 

User from another forum:
 
I also noticed that the azzies can take some time starting from wood to really start growing but once the got it, they are pretty fast.
This doesnt happen when they come from rye grains (I think thats where they take the energy from to get faster on the WL-Tek).
 
My response:
 
Starch decays much easier and faster than complex cellulose, which is likely the reason why it's used to make seeds (grains are seeds).
The plant embryo will secrete amylase, and decay the starch, to start life in the ground-other and grow out as normal.
 
Mycelium need resources to grow and produce enzymes, no enzymes = no growth (in general).
In comparison, 100% cellulose is slow to release, and needs more enzymes.
 
It's possible to spawn WL-Tek to WL-Tek, however the cellulose is partially decayed, and contains enzymes.
 
----
 
Phenols conclusion:
 
Imagine usable phenols-other as a convertible carbon (into sugar) for mycelium-other which produce relevant enzymes and reactions.
Speed is not as fast as ready glucose due to conversion, however, ultimately it performs extremely well (white-rot).
 
In addition, adding phenols to paper (acid-free, no phenols) increases the chances of molds-other.
I conclude the phenols activate and germinate spores, and support growth on cellulose.
 
----
 
Note:
 
WL-Tek works best with clean grain (starch) spawn.





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