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Communal Woodlover Grow log


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#3721 YoshiTrainer

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 09:57 AM

The agar wedges were "mostly clean", 2 out of the 3 jars (per sp.) seem to be outrunning the bad stuff. Woodlovers have a strong will to live! :)
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#3722 Ferather

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 10:07 AM

Extension of my above post (and some re-posting), now you guys hopefully understand a few things. We can put them together, and get better grows.

 

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As mentioned above wood has a low pH (acidic), and the secondary compounds such as lignin are acidic and inhibitory.
Enzymes (type of protein), have a functioning pH range, outside this range they don't work well, or at all.
 
In order for mycelium to synthesize enzymes, it needs carbon, and nitrogen (and other).
 
Wood-pH.jpg
 
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Calcium carbonate (lime), reacts and neutralizes acids, it also produces a 'soluble' calcium bicarbonate.
 
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l0wbob:
 
Here are two images from l0wbob, who put some Azure spawn to WL-Tek, 50-50 wood-paper pellets. The same recipe I use on oysters.
WL-Tek is paper-wood pellets with added soluble plant food and calcium carbonate (measured, requires experience).
 
Adding the plant food increases the total nitrogen content.
 
352397177-20181129_212411.jpg 352521586-20181129_215933.jpg
 
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Notice the thick, populated 'well-fed' growth, not rhizomorphic, not weak.
 
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bobwastaken:
 
Mycelium is looking vibrant and healthy lowbob. Hope your projects reward you with a lot of fruits.
I also like the 50/50 paper pellets and pine mix. These active gyms are fruiting from this mixture enriched with powdered dog food.
 
596114124-P1060910_2048x1536.jpg 596114332-P1060915_2048x2048.jpg
 
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Nature:
 
Summer oyster benefiting from nitrogen fixating blue-green algae. Fruiting from nitrogen deficient cotton wood, @ 7°C.
 
657526495-IMG_20170208_154741.jpg 657526935-IMG_20170208_154801.jpg
 
----
 
363235422-MG-Nutrients.jpg

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#3723 Arathu

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 10:45 AM

Awesome......the gears are turning.......

 

A


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#3724 Ferather

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 02:36 PM

Here are some images for illustration-educational purposes, and to allow you guys-gals to visibly compare colony growth (looks weak, looks well fed).

 

624431972-IMG_20170204_212054.jpg 666942808-IMG_20170209_193906.jpg 685050992-IMG_20170211_215537.jpg 699162703-IMG_20170213_120225.jpg 709909147-IMG_20170214_185740.jpg 718157406-IMG_20170215_175545.jpg 721020243-IMG_20170611_203712.jpg 721020546-IMG_20170611_203833.jpg

 

I love WBS as spawn, regardless, the above is Tarragon oyster, with visibly identical growth to the Azures above.

As the mycelium reaches higher amounts of oxygen, growth changes, and a thick band formed.

 

If I leave the lid on too long after full maturity, I get capless pins in abundance.

 

744866984-IMG_20170614_145213.jpg 744867291-IMG_20170614_145250.jpg

 

https://www.youtube....0&v=H8Id5jMKQh0


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#3725 ItBeBasidia

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 05:57 PM

Very interesting Ferather. I wasn't aware how important nitrogen supplementation to carbon substrates for growth was.

I wonder how urea or urine would do in lieu of plant food as a nitrogen source.

I'll probably run some cyans on HWFP and urea w/ hydrated lime next to a control of HWFP and verm sometime in the future when I get caught up on all my projects.

Edited by ItBeBasidia, 03 June 2020 - 05:58 PM.

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#3726 Ferather

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 10:48 AM

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4397375/  < Link to information you need, Table 4 (nitrogen sources), you might also like Table 3 (carbon sources).

 

Mycelium prefer ammonia where possible, this is because nitrogen-fixating organisms produce nitrogenase (see here).

Nitrogenase converts atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia, which is then utilized to synthesize materials.

 

Please note mycelium have had a relationship with algae-other for a very long time.

See my post above to see oysters benefiting from blue-green algae.


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#3727 Arathu

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 02:19 PM

So a wood-lover and dung-lover walk into a bar....

The bartender asks the wood-lover, "whatta ya have?"

Woodie say's "Piss-N-Chips with a soda????"

"And you stinky?"

"Shiiiit"  


Edited by Arathu, 04 June 2020 - 02:19 PM.

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#3728 Ferather

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 04:10 PM

:biggrin:



#3729 Ferather

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 04:26 PM

If you cant do wood lovers because of temperatures or other reasons, but can grow Cubensis, try experimenting with WL-Tek but no wood.

Here are some old images of Cubensis Cambodian brown rice spawn to WL-Tek (scrap paper + plant fertilizer).

 

Here I left one of the fruits out, cut, so see how much oxidation occurred, it looks very potent.

 

955507891-PC_1.jpg 955507975-PC_2.jpg 955508050-PC_3.jpg

955508095-PC_4.jpg 955508151-PC_5.jpg 955508252-PC_6.jpg


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#3730 UnHeisenbug

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 06:35 AM

From my cheap university education, I can recall that nitrogen is found in several forms in the environment. While the air around us is mostly inert diatomic nitrogen, nitrogen is "fixed" by various organism. The diatomic bond is a triple bond makes nitrogen bind to itself quite strongly. This may be why it is such a commodity in the biological world.

The cycle is seemingly more complex then carbon cycles. However, it is critical to all biological molecules (nucleotides to build DNA and amino acids to build proteins) plus psilocybin which is derived from the amino acid tryptophan, the same molecule mammals use to produce serotonin

There is my info dump on nitrogen in biochem

8bff7bf1aa541f94dd73d48e7f664327.jpg

Edited by UnHeisenbug, 05 June 2020 - 07:18 AM.

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#3731 Ferather

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 10:16 AM

Indeed they contain nitrogen, and therefor nitrogen is needed to synthesize Psilocybin.
 
Baeocystin:  [C11]--[H15]--[N2]--[O4]--[P]
Norbaeocystin: [C10]--[H13]--[N2]--[O4]--[P]
 
Psilocybin:  [C12]--[H17]--[N2]--[O4]--[P]
Psilocin:  [C12]--[H16]--[N2]--[O]

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#3732 ljacve55

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Posted 06 June 2020 - 08:13 AM

Hey people!
I have a question about expanding micelium of 4 different specie of woodloving psilocybes.
I was gifted with Psilocybe Azurenscens,Cyanenscens,Subaerginosa and Quebecensis.
So the question is about how i didnt put micelium on sterilized wbs,corn ext.,but i put it dieectly on pasterized alder woodchips about a monht ago.
All 4 have sign of growing and i feel good about that.I want to now is that mistake and should i put it first on some grain first.I feel like a fool asking this after i did what i did.
I just want to be sure im doing good job and you guys are right people to ask that.
I grow mushrooms for 5 years now but i only grow cubensis and truffles.This is a hole new league of growing and im here to learn how to propper grow woodlovers.
Maybe i did a rooky mistake for putting mic. directly on woodchips but i see growt so im thinking i did something good.What do you guys think?Grets from Croatia!!!
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#3733 Arathu

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Posted 06 June 2020 - 11:19 AM

I think I'm going to buy some ferts......there I said it out loud......

 

Hello ljavce55......it is not necessarily a mistake but the time it will take for those to colonize and consume straight wood chips will be long....(we run into moisture and contamination problems as a result IME)

For woodlovers we are dealing with long time frames anyway and so "other organism" may also grow on your wood chips. They WILL compete for the food...

Creating grain spawn from sterilized grains gives the fungus a food/nutrient rich source AND environment in which to dominate.....(exactly what we want to happen)

It requires the inoculation culture is "clean" else the grains will contaminate....and once that happens they have to be discarded for the most part....(not always BUT that's another story)

Once the grains are fully colonized we either expand to more grain (g2g expansion) or use the grains, broken up, to expand to pasteurized wood chips and can also be put to sterilized bran enriched saw dusts/chips....

The idea is to have/create MANY points of inoculation (using grain spawns or sawdust spawns) vs just a few by adding colonized chips or as you have said just mycelium......I don't know if it was an LC or a couple of chips you received.....

 

I don't know that I could call what you are doing any rookie mistake especially since you are seeing growth on all four. What you now have is a growing substrate AND a source of specific fungus to grab samples from and transfer to cardboard/pulps, soft woody stems, and even cloning/isolating using agar and multiple transfers. Once you've established a growing colony it will likely be fairly hardy and any number of expansions can be done. Isolation on agar will allow you to take those to sterilized grains and follow well known cultivation practices that can be found here in this thread, in the MASSIVE vaults here at Topia (which is where I learned it from), and any of the several good growing books that can be found....

 

One major beauty that I have seen and experienced is a "contaminated" substrate taken outdoors and mixed with potting soil into a natural substrate and setting, kept wet by watering regularly, will tend to "heal" and the woodlover will continue to grow. Grass clippings can be placed over the top and misted regularly for a very good casing layer. Keep in mind that in the wild there will be significant competition for the food sources. The strongest survive and the weaker/less capable become FOOD.....

 

Sending you good wood lover growing vibes....that mix of species established into multiple beds could be all that you could ever want/need. The time frames are way longer than cubensis but beds that are taken care of will continue to produce for years vs months.....

 

I hope that helps some....I'm sure you will develop more questions and so WELCOME to the Communal Woodlover Grow Log......It's huge and will take many months to read through but it's well worth the efforts IMHO, especially since woodlovers take a long time to grow and fruiting is another game all unto itself. 

 

In it for the long haul.....

 

A


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#3734 Arathu

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Posted 06 June 2020 - 02:12 PM

https://www.planetna...king/c-n-ratio/
 
That splains a few things....case a woodlover bed about 1 to 2 inches deep with grass clippings and weeds from the garden.....
 
On a good draining bed keep it wet.....about two weeks later peel some back and take a look under.....
 
Very Interesting..........
 
A


Edited by Arathu, 06 June 2020 - 04:27 PM.

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#3735 UnHeisenbug

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Posted 07 June 2020 - 05:26 PM

Mmmm with all this talk of nitrogen I wonder about companion plants near or in beds. I'm sure as you folks are aware, legumes are capable of fixing nitrogen in the soil by a symbiotic relationship with a soil microbe.

I've hear of Rhododendrons as companion plants, but I wonder if a legume might be better for sustaining outdoor beds.

Although, it seems this might be more applicable to grassland species.

Just thinking out loud

Cheers folks!
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#3736 Arathu

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 05:12 AM

I'm about to add drops (very carefully in fact using a hypodermic needle) of fertilizer water to some of my eggar........

 

small_GEDC7388.jpg

 

small_GEDC7391.jpg

 

 

small_GEDC7398.jpg

 

small_GEDC7409.jpg

 

Just to see what happens.......as can be seen here this "eggar" works quite well. That top piece is basically glued in place by mycelium....a wood sandwich...

 

Chips of woody stalk plants will be added next and some of those will also have fertilizer mixed in their hydration water.....

 

Experiment and let them teach......

 

A


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#3737 Ferather

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 07:56 AM

Egg carton, newspaper, all good, brown card beware they can contain resins and other un-natural chemicals.

I can see its doing much better on the egg carton, I see rhizos turning into populated growth.

 

This is probably due to decay rate, and the open structure mentioned previously.

If its binding together already, its penetrating the egg carton.

 

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Here is some brown card, with added nutrients, but it turned out it was full of resins and so on.

Growth became rhizomorphic and weak due to the resins and other chemicals.

 

484944115-IMG_20160120_012201.jpg 484944250-IMG_20160120_012223.jpg

 

Here I dumped WL-Tek pine pellets (added nutrients) directly on top of the brown card.

 

484944319-IMG_20160128_164330.jpg 484944392-IMG_20160128_164508.jpg


Edited by Ferather, 08 June 2020 - 08:05 AM.

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#3738 Ferather

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Posted 10 June 2020 - 07:39 AM

WL-Tek
 
Acid-free paper - Cellulose from any plant, contains no lignin and limited phenols. Requires enrichment (added nutrients).
 
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Adjust this recipe to suit your needs and brands used, use organic materials if required or preferred.
The items I am using are being used for the nutrients, and because they are clean.
 
This recipe adds no starch or simple sugar to the media.
 
270737499-IMG_20170420_162701.jpg 384352769-IMG_20170503_200822.jpg 885908397-IMG_20160718_170848.jpg
 
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Recipes:
 
Lignicolous: 480g > Water | 100g > Paper Pellets | 50g > Wood Pellets | 6g > MG Nutrients | 0.72g > YN Nutrients.
General: 400g > Water | 125g > Paper Pellets | 5g > MG Nutrients | 0.6g > YN Nutrients.
 
Optional: 2-8g > Ultra Fine Calcium Carbonate (CaCO3, 95-98%).
 
885906070-IMG_20160718_170209.jpg 885906471-IMG_20160718_170210.jpg
885907220-IMG_20160718_170317.jpg 885907621-IMG_20160718_170454.jpg
 
 
Basic assembly guide:
 
Using a jug, measure your additives, using boiling hot water, add the water needed.
Mix together using a clean fork, the solubles will dissolve automatically.
 
Measure your pellets into a bowl 5-6x bigger than the pellets.
Add the nutrient water to the pellets then mix-n-mash.
 
 
Microwave guide:
 
Tip: If you do not have a microwave pressure cooker, use a container that has a microwaveable lid, leave a gap.
 
Transfer the mush to the microwave pressure cooker, fairly loose, push down lightly when full.
Cook for 60+ seconds, mix for about 2 minutes, then cook again for 60+ seconds.
 
Make sure the top vents are closed (rice cooking guidelines).
 
 
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622830798-IMG_20170203_155428.jpg 622831114-IMG_20170204_161001.jpg
 
The above I am using tea leaves as an additive.
 
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Weigh your substrate before and after cooking, so you know how much water was lost, remains.
Adjust the above water amount and cook time to suit your setup where needed.
 
Note, 25g dry is enough to test experiments, send samples.
 
045484899-IMG_20170325_150951.jpg 074017270-IMG_20170328_232034.jpg 074017814-IMG_20170328_232148.jpg

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#3739 ljacve55

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Posted 10 June 2020 - 03:53 PM

Thanks Arathu for taking the time to explain how i can propper expand my cultures.I will put my agar knowlege to work,i have all the tools so finger crossed.
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#3740 Mycol

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Posted 13 June 2020 - 03:22 PM

I’ve got some almost 2 month old cyan working it’s way across some agar . Can I just soak some wood chips, shavings or twigs- PC and then transfer to agar to let them colonize ? Then transfer those

I’ve seen rotted maple mentioned Here a few times I think ? Japanese knotweed too, I think I’ve got some near me .
I have lots of oak around here .


I’ve read a couple dozen pages of this log and hope to get all caught up one day .




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