Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
* * * * * 19 votes

Communal Woodlover Grow log


  • Please log in to reply
2517 replies to this topic

#21 waylitjim

waylitjim

    A Mirror Image

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 4,706 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 23 October 2012 - 07:43 PM

Here's a list of links for background reading on various woodlovers for those interested.

https://mycotopia.ne...html#post843845

I like reading threads like those and then getting lost following links within each thread. Hyper-link information fractals ...


That's a great collection of links right there. It's fun to fall into the worm hole and get sucked into our myco-vortex. It's a wonderful way to spend a few hours. You'll always come out the other end backwards, cross-eyed and full of new understanding.

#22 Arathu

Arathu

    Dirtmaker

  • OG VIP
  • 3,442 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 23 October 2012 - 08:43 PM

Incredible additions I'm absorbed! :meditate:

#23 Arathu

Arathu

    Dirtmaker

  • OG VIP
  • 3,442 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 23 October 2012 - 09:24 PM

https://mycotopia.ne...oo-img_2154.jpg


Holy Fuck! Just one entry into the:

The wormhole!

Fuuuuuuuuck! Incredible..............:bow:

This picture blows my mind!

Edited by Arathu, 23 October 2012 - 10:00 PM.
Holy Fuck wasn't enough


#24 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 6,950 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:20 AM

That picture is sweet :)

#25 waylitjim

waylitjim

    A Mirror Image

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 4,706 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 24 October 2012 - 01:19 PM

Shot from this morning ... :D

Attached Thumbnails

  • frisco0002.JPG

Edited by waylitjim, 30 October 2012 - 01:20 PM.

  • paph and Coopdog like this

#26 hyphaenation

hyphaenation

    Former Staff

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 13,175 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 24 October 2012 - 01:27 PM

You are catching on to this 'woodlover thing Mr. Waylit ...

:hugs:

#27 Zwapa

Zwapa

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 227 posts

Posted 24 October 2012 - 02:12 PM

Mr. Waylit, can i ask where you put your tubs? Outside, inside, do you give them extra water?
They do look very clean . :loveeyes:
Thanx for this thread Mr. arathu ! Very very nice.

#28 Arathu

Arathu

    Dirtmaker

  • OG VIP
  • 3,442 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 28 October 2012 - 12:41 PM

I just looked at mine outdoors, it's raining ice cold rain, maple leaves have fallen and covered the casing layer, and the ovoid mycelium is tearing into the Naturescapes. As far as worrying about the Naturescapes mulch I'm not, and I know this...It can't possibly be worse than the land these babies came from....trust me. I'm going with it and expanding!
Thanks WLJ and everyone else! It looks to me that spring will hold an interesting bloom of ovoids! :teeth: I'll be like an expecting father in the damn waiting room, I think I'm gonna steal some of the colonized wood from the outdoor bed to start more spawn with it. Now that grain isn't involved there isn't much to do but feed the mycelium wet wood and organic soils...........this is what I'm talking about. Once you have these babies established they're just gonna live side by side with you say "Hey dude, wet wood please!" :thumbup: I mean literally no matter what material is put in this bed the mycelium is eating it.

This bed has hickory, wild cherry, oak, fresh maple, rotted maple, golden rod, burdock, Japanese knotweed, various leaves and weed materials, mixed with the black soil from the bottom of a compost heap and river sand. And now this layer of Naturescapes mulch which is apparently conifer materials covered with a thick layer of wet fresh dropped maple leaves. Poking down through and peeking (there's something about growing mushrooms that makes you peek) the mycelium is eating everything in there. It is a truly equal opportunity colonizer and digestion machine.......I can smell it when I approach the bed. It smells like.....................MAGICK..................... :meditate:
  • Erkee and 555 like this

#29 ConsciousFeeder

ConsciousFeeder

    Too rich the rich king.

  • Expired Member
  • 920 posts

Posted 29 October 2012 - 08:52 AM

So Arathu with a bed about your size what is the lowest temperatures that it can sustain without killing the bed? It gets cold here down to -10 F often with snow periodically all winter. I think a good option for me would potentially be a cooler like WLJ does inside my garage or cold storage room.

Also loved getting lost in the wormhole of this thread. Got lots of reading to do from hyph's link. :amazed:

#30 Arathu

Arathu

    Dirtmaker

  • OG VIP
  • 3,442 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 29 October 2012 - 04:52 PM

So Arathu with a bed about your size what is the lowest temperatures that it can sustain without killing the bed? It gets cold here down to -10 F often with snow periodically all winter. I think a good option for me would potentially be a cooler like WLJ does inside my garage or cold storage room.

Also loved getting lost in the wormhole of this thread. Got lots of reading to do from hyph's link. :amazed:


Good question, the mushrooms are native to this area, they haven't died off in the wild yet and it's made it down to -18F so far. I guess the years will tell the tale. :meditate:

#31 hyphaenation

hyphaenation

    Former Staff

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 13,175 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 29 October 2012 - 05:11 PM

- 10 or colder is fine. Firstly snow insustlates, plus you usually add leaves and debris that also quilt the bed. The mycelium is very much alive and growing under there. Not an issue.

https://mycotopia.ne...html#post821705

Edited by hyphaenation, 29 October 2012 - 05:45 PM.
Add link

  • 555 likes this

#32 Arathu

Arathu

    Dirtmaker

  • OG VIP
  • 3,442 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 29 October 2012 - 07:09 PM

This picture excites me into almost a frenzy because the growth I'm seeing right now in the mass of wood making up my bed, some of them quite significant, means that by spring there will be a damn near a solid 8 inch thick mycelium. Holy shit.....I feel a canopy coming on! :meditate:

#33 iatebadshrooms

iatebadshrooms

    And It stained skyBlue

  • Free Member
  • 1,016 posts

Posted 30 October 2012 - 01:55 PM

Here we got on left, just over a pint of Azurescens Astoria, and on right same amount but Cyanescens washington, both on corn.
DSCF7005.JPG
I took some hickory chips and a rotting log of either maple or oak, crushed it and soaked, in cooler, 4 tablespoons bleach, allong with my corrugated cardboard.
Pic of the soaking chips and after being drained.
DSCF7008.JPG

Then I found these nice bins at grocery, 3 bucks for 2. About 3 inches deep, clear lids. I burned about 5 holes 1"diameter in the lids for FAE.
Here they are.
DSCF7007.JPG

Now the fun part. Spawned both Azure and Cyan to the mix of hickory/rotted oak or maple. I hope that the extremly soft oak will colonize quickly.

Layered style, Corrugated cardboard, spawn, woodchips, lid, then covered with foil and poked holes, Then into incubator.
Here is the Azure and Cyanescens.
DSCF7010.JPG

Now finally we come to the MYCO BAG OF Psilocybe Weilii, N. Georgia collection.
This bag consist of Pine cone, Pine twigs, random wood debris, redclay. and a quart of Weilii spawn on corn.
Seems to be doing well, I can see the mycelium migrating to the pinecones. I believe that this would go faster without the clay, So my next couple jars that need to be spawned will go into bins instead of bags, and without the clay, but the mix will still be pine cone as the main ingredient.
Here it is
DSCF7001.JPG

So I hope to have enough spawn to start my outdoor weilii bed by end of january, I will lay down all this spawn on top of wood chips, then cover with redclay and soil mixture. Topped with grass seed and watered. My goal will be to grow the grass healthy and with it will come the Weilii when the temperature is right, The N. Georgia Weilii are very aggressive, and want to fruit. I know that these will give me no problems what so ever and I highly recommend this species to any one wanting to break into wood lovers. They have the potency and a beautiful look to them. Easy to grow. Just burry your spawn or make a fancy bed, Either way you will get fruits...

Attached Thumbnails

  • DSCF7006.JPG
  • DSCF7009.JPG
  • DSCF7017.JPG
  • DSCF7013.JPG
  • DSCF7016.JPG
  • DSCF7011.JPG
  • DSCF7004.JPG
  • DSCF7003.JPG
  • DSCF7002.JPG

  • 555 likes this

#34 iatebadshrooms

iatebadshrooms

    And It stained skyBlue

  • Free Member
  • 1,016 posts

Posted 30 October 2012 - 03:06 PM

Mandrax, How is it going with your beds, I assume your outdoor beds are already established? or are you making them as winter sets in and hoping that the mycelium continues to colonize and fruit this winter?
I can see that working in a temperate area, Kina like where I am at. We rarely get freezing temperatures and always above freezing during the day in the winters, I believe that Azure and Cyan's would continue to colonize during the winter months here in my area.

Ovoids and Weilii on the other hand like to fruit in the spring summer and fall....

Arathu, I cant wait to see your ovoid bed this spring, Are you gonna top the wood chips with soil and add grass seed?

#35 iatebadshrooms

iatebadshrooms

    And It stained skyBlue

  • Free Member
  • 1,016 posts

Posted 30 October 2012 - 05:15 PM

I just looked at mine outdoors, it's raining ice cold rain, maple leaves have fallen and covered the casing layer, and the ovoid mycelium is tearing into the Naturescapes. As far as worrying about the Naturescapes mulch I'm not, and I know this...It can't possibly be worse than the land these babies came from....trust me. I'm going with it and expanding!
Thanks WLJ and everyone else! It looks to me that spring will hold an interesting bloom of ovoids! :teeth: I'll be like an expecting father in the damn waiting room, I think I'm gonna steal some of the colonized wood from the outdoor bed to start more spawn with it. Now that grain isn't involved there isn't much to do but feed the mycelium wet wood and organic soils...........this is what I'm talking about. Once you have these babies established they're just gonna live side by side with you say "Hey dude, wet wood please!" :thumbup: I mean literally no matter what material is put in this bed the mycelium is eating it.

This bed has hickory, wild cherry, oak, fresh maple, rotted maple, golden rod, burdock, Japanese knotweed, various leaves and weed materials, mixed with the black soil from the bottom of a compost heap and river sand. And now this layer of Naturescapes mulch which is apparently conifer materials covered with a thick layer of wet fresh dropped maple leaves. Poking down through and peeking (there's something about growing mushrooms that makes you peek) the mycelium is eating everything in there. It is a truly equal opportunity colonizer and digestion machine.......I can smell it when I approach the bed. It smells like.....................MAGICK..................... :meditate:



LOL! yeah, man the waiting game sucks, Thats why I am tackling some new indoor species while waiting for the time to come for the outdoor woodlovers.
Maybe you should do pan cyans all winter, Im doing Pan cyans and Treasure coast. I also have ATL#7 psilocybe atlantis, That should be fun. Gonna do rye grass seed in myco bags and just do scelortia for a while then fruit em.

ANyway I have seen and heard from many that the OVoideocystidiata is the most aggressive colonizer of wood and anything your throw at it!!!! I really like your mix of woods you used, that is exactly what they would absolutely thrive on in the wild, I gurantee your fruits are gonna be super potent, and big,,,,I cant wait,,,I want a print!! I got a print of ovoid, but it failed to germinate on agar, Im gonna try it again with my last print, use a little piece of it, and make a liquid culture, then put that on agar, and see what happens. I would like to also get ovoids going like you,,

I have a question, What do you think about making a bed in the middle of winter? Its gonna take me 3 months to build enough ovoid and weilii spawn to even make some decent beds, So I have to lay the spawn and cover it in the middle of winter,,,I live in an area where its not that cold usually 30's at night to 50's day time, so, I am confident I can make these beds in the middle of winter and they will colonize the top layer of new wood I put over them, Plus Im thinking about using allot of top soil with ovoid's just like I am doing with Weilii, THat should keep them nice and warm. Throw some grass seed on top, and let them thrive together, I think MYC did the grass with the Ovoids and they really loved it, Weilii also love it, So may as well top that bed off with soil and rye grass seeed.

#36 Arathu

Arathu

    Dirtmaker

  • OG VIP
  • 3,442 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 30 October 2012 - 05:47 PM

The ovoids I have found in the wild are growing from wood of all types including the knotweed from the previous year, in basically bare river mud and sand with new green Japanese Knotweed providing partial shade. Little if any grasses were present but a very thick layer of leaves covered the ground. After analyzing the make up of this environment this bed should come pretty close to what the parents are thriving in.

PIC_1706.JPG
Knotweed, maple leaves and seeds, dead rotting soaking wet wood of all kinds and underneath it is sandy mud riverbank. One thing to note all of my finds have been on the backside of piled up flood wash where everything is mixed together and then covered with the organic materials from the previous fall. The wood rotting in the ground is definitely much older than the top cover. If I plant anything here it will be Japanese Knotweed but I really doubt there will be a need.


With the mildness of your winters I would suspect that you could basically put a bed in at any time once a significant amount of wood chip spawn is generated. This stuff is pretty hearty IME.

Attached Thumbnails

  • PIC_1711.JPG
  • PIC_1712.JPG
  • PIC_1713.JPG


#37 hyphaenation

hyphaenation

    Former Staff

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 13,175 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 30 October 2012 - 09:06 PM

Hate when a long post gets vaporized in a net fart.. Oh well. To paraphrase:

I tried several experiments with leaves and woodlovers after having great success with cubies. When I placed p.cyan mycelium in moist leaves it never grew on bit in months. The only growth was a comically thin line of mycelium b-lining it out of the leaves.

Leaves do make handy mulch , but not got woodlover food in my experience. They do work wonders for cubensis though...

#38 wildturtle

wildturtle

    VIP Member

  • Expired Member
  • 186 posts

Posted 31 October 2012 - 02:16 AM

Hate when a long post gets vaporized in a net fart.. Oh well. To paraphrase:

I tried several experiments with leaves and woodlovers after having great success with cubies. When I placed p.cyan mycelium in moist leaves it never grew on bit in months. The only growth was a comically thin line of mycelium b-lining it out of the leaves.

Leaves do make handy mulch , but not got woodlover food in my experience. They do work wonders for cubensis though...


Sorry if this is a bit off topic, but FOAF would love to know more about your leaf mulch-cubensis successes if you could PM me some details. FOAF been thinking about different ways they could use shredded oak/maple leaves other than composting. Also was wondering if woodlovers would like a hardwood leaf substrate mix (gypsum, and/or CaCO3, various hardwood chips/sawdust and/or popcorn, and majority finely shredded leaves) in polyfiled qt. jars and PCed for 60-90 min at 15 psi or pasteurized for 60 min.?; then later knocked up by LC or agar chunk and further spawned to monotubs and outside beds. Could someone use ashes from hardwoods to raise pH or is that too harsh? Any input would be much appreciated!

#39 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 6,950 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 31 October 2012 - 06:44 AM

Maybe all that debri that gets washed down there acts like a natural casing layer?

#40 Arathu

Arathu

    Dirtmaker

  • OG VIP
  • 3,442 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 31 October 2012 - 04:35 PM

In my experiences too I have not seen the mycelium growing from the leaf materials either. At least with looking at the ovoid mycelium it is fruiting from pieces of rotten wood or the the woody materials of knotweed. The leaves are definitely acting as mulch and providing a very humid, probably hi CO2, and protective micro-climate right on top of the mycelium but they don't seem to colonize it. You can see a little bit of that in the above pictures that I posted. That leaf material is several inches thick and quite dense. One other note on leaves is that they tend to lower the pH of the soil. Since these wood-lover beds are just coming together it's too early for me to try and make a call on the significance.




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!