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Coopoperative Gourmet/Medicinal Mushroom Farm?


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#141 Alder Logs

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 09:38 AM

So, starting a new page at this Alder Farm, I would like to say again that the mushroom farm idea has been replaced mostly with the idea of this Community Shop facility.  Something good for the locals to share, and hopefully care for when I have shuffled off.  My dream, if not producing shiitakes or whatever, is to produce something of high quality in a sustainable manner, as a cooperative, worker owned, company. 

 

==========================================

 

Today's plan is to start building some kind of trusswork to stiffen the tops of the posts and keep the overall structure stable, as with no walls, such a structure will be a wing when the big winds come.   I could get by with just some big knee bracing all around, but I want some structure to stand lumber on end against.  So, I'm thinking that a trusswork scheme with its bottom cord about five feet below the top of the top beams would be nearly nine feet above the ground, and could support standing up ten foot lumber, as I rarely cut anything shorter than ten feet.  I don't cut much over 16 feet, so even that will be able to stand between the roof trusses near the center of the shelter. 

 

I'm going to add another post to the north side because there will never be access from that side.  The east, west, and south sides must stay open, though nine feet will be plenty open for the future when this will become where the sawmill sits.  It will be nice to have a roof over it someday, when the shop is finally built, and the lumber will be used up or in there.   The twenty foot open south side will allow long logs to be moved to the mill.  The open east and west ends will allow the mill to be moved in and out, as the drive approaches from the west, and there will be a large door on the shop just out the east end.   So, lumber coming off the mill can go straight into the first floor of the shop building, via a roller conveyor, where it can then be stacked for slow drying. 


Edited by Alder Logs, 08 August 2017 - 09:43 AM.

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#142 Alder Logs

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 11:25 PM

I was interrupted by two days of doing metal work to repair the cab on a Toro Grounds Master 3000-D mower (that mows our disc golf course since I quit mowing it after 15 years with my tractors).   The cab was falling apart, as all 8 corners of the cab had been broken before and welded up a couple of times.  The evidence is this is the third time it's broken.  I welded it back up, knowing that the welds will break again if something wasn't done to brace the whole thing with thicker steel.  So, I made ten cut out and welded braces, or splints for the welds, and that took up two full days.  It's either that, or I will be mowing again, and I ain't going to do that if I can help it.  

 

So, I finally got back on my job yesterday, but it was three steps forward and two back.  I kept making small fuck-ups, doing it just a little bit wrong and had to be packing the heavy timbers up and down the ladders and scaffold for redoing after failed fittings, and setting and resetting the third north side post.  No real big errors, just not getting it right and having to saw and chisel a bit more.   That's better than cutting too much off and ruining material.  At long last, I got finished with what was almost done yesterday with an all-dayer today.

 

I used a big ratchet strap and some mallet banging to pull some bow out of the posts and get the two Port Orford cedar beams to meet in the center.  I made the beams by splitting a 6X6 post I had made earlier with the sawmill.    PO cedar is hard and dense and weighs a lot compared to most softwoods.

 

gallery_131808_1489_89362.jpg

 

The Port Orford cedar post is on a 3/4" threaded bolt and 5 inch channel iron stirrup. The bolt is into the post 6 inches and is double nutted under the stirrup, so it's adjustable and lockable at the right height. The concrete pier block is buried flush with ground surface, resting on hard pan clay tuff.

 

gallery_131808_1489_74055.jpg

 

I got the teco nails into the stirrup and also the missing ones on the 'T' plate.  Found the right length bolt and replaced the too short one after the picture was taken.  

 

This might go faster if I were to use simpler joinery. I pounded the beams in with a mallet to a very tight fit and secured them to the posts with three 5/16X5 lags.   The notches were done with many circular saw cuts and a chisel.   The beam ends are notched 1 inch, as is the post.  I don't know what that kind of joint is called.  Maybe some kind of scarf joint?

 

Joinery detail.

 

gallery_131808_1489_401.jpg

 

Tomorrow the plan is to make 6 3X4 45ᴼ diagonal trusswork pieces between the top and bottom cords and put some knee braces below the bottom cord beams.

 

Tuesday, I am stuck with going to town to shop.


Edited by Alder Logs, 13 August 2017 - 11:32 PM.

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#143 Arathu

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 05:44 PM

Damn brother you have major skills! Awesome work Alder!

 

A


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#144 Alder Logs

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 09:04 PM

Thanks, Arathu. 

 

Shit for progress today, as I discovered that both top 20 foot beams are bowing inwards as they continue to dry out.  The bow is too much to expect I could pull it out by nailing on the roof trusses, so  I have decided the next step right now is to put a 3X9X15'6" spreader beam at the ten foot center point between the two beams.   Found one 3X9 joist hanger (who'd'a thought they even made such a thing?) in a box of such hardware I bought at a thrift store.  Also in that box was a 2X12 joist hanger that I straightened out and re-bent and shortened to make another hanger for a 3X9.   The hangers will just be to help to set it up there.  I will lag bolt it with three on each end, in case I would ever want to use it to hoist something heavy. 

 

I'm rethinking the trussworks on the sides and ends, thinking it would be overkill.  I'm thinking cross beams and knee braces should suffice to stiffen everything adequately.    It's better that the 20 foot beams both bowed inwards, as if they had been bowing in the same direction, I would have to pull it straight and add a bunch of bracing.   Those two beams came from the same log and I put the heart side of the beams facing each other.  I guessed it was normal for these to shrink to the heart, or pith, side.  Not so, as the bow is going the other way.   I am going to hoist the new center 3X9X15'6" with a boom I made for the tractor loader.  That will get it within grabbing distance from someone on the scaffolds.   Then it can be set into the hangers.   One other thing I will need to do is make a device to spread the two bowed beams back apart.   I figure it can be done with a 16' and an 8' 2X4, bolted together near the center of the 16 footer and near the end of the 8.   

 

This afternoon got sidetracked into more metal working, as a tree broke in the woods the other night and fell on one of the disc golf baskets, mangling it severely.    I straightened it as best I could and welded back a bunch of broken welds.   It ain't pretty, but it's playable.   So, as of now I am totally toasted.   Tomorrow morning I have to go to Astoria for groceries and more 3/8 flat washers.    I used up my package of 50 already.   I'm starting to wonder if I will get this project finished before the rainy season kicks off and the site turns into a mud hole.   I can't be on it when its wet.


Edited by Alder Logs, 14 August 2017 - 09:27 PM.

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#145 Juthro

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 11:14 PM

A's right, you do some damn fine work there, Alder.
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#146 Alder Logs

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 05:46 PM

The first thing today was build the spreader gizmo to push the bow out of the beams.  Here is it in place.

 

gallery_131808_1489_120983.jpg

 

Here's some details of the spreader:

 

the firstgallery_131808_1489_34277.jpg

 

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The first attempt to put the beam up was an abort.  I had the chain too short and could see that if I got the beam nailed into place that I would not have had enough slack to unhook the chain from the fully raised boom.  

 

gallery_131808_1489_198649.jpg

 

By having more slack in the chain, I wasn't able to lift the beam as high, so I used a couple of ratchet straps to pull up the second end, after I had a couple teco nails in the first end's hanger.  It took a bit of doin' but the beam hangers are all nailed in.  I had to come up and get an extension ladder so I can go up and unhook the chain.   It was 2:30 and I was late for lunch.   Time flies when you're having fun.   I will shoot some lags into the ends of the center beam when I go back down there in a few minutes.

 

Here's a closeup of the boom device I built to fit on the log forks that I built for the loader quick attach.   So, this can go on any of my tractors, but this tractor's loader has the highest reach, so I used it today.

 

gallery_131808_1489_16466.jpg


Edited by Alder Logs, 16 August 2017 - 05:51 PM.

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#147 Arathu

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 06:28 PM

Not only does the brother have skills but SERIOUS TOOLS too..............oh my! :thumbs_up:

 

Looking good Alder.......you've done this once or twice before...........

 

A


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#148 Alder Logs

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Posted 17 August 2017 - 12:39 AM

Well, I really have never done anything much like this before. 

 

I worked until I had the pickup repacked at 6:00.   Drove it up the hill to this cabin and walked back to get the tractor.  Then I sold 7.5 pounds of shiitakes, after moving half a dozen logs out of and into the soak tank.  Long day, again.  Have to keep moving while the ground is dry.  Hope I get this finished and filled with this dry lumber before the rains return.  

 

gallery_131808_1489_59298.jpg

 

All I got done on this today is that middle beam.   Tomorrow I plan on taking down the north side scaffolding and setting it up again inside the posts.  That's on the right side in this picture.

 

gallery_131808_1489_87897.jpg

 

It's amazing how many of my tools came from garage sales, thrift stores, and Craigslist.   Three out of the four stepladders and the extension ladder on the pickup rack, all Craigslist (including the rack).  The first tier of scaffold frames were dirt cheap on CL, but I just had to bite the bullet for $500 to buy the eight frames on top, because I needed that other pattern.  The chop saw and Honda generator in the pickup were CL too, but most of the tools were either given to me or more likely, thrift stores and garage sales. 

 

The tractor in the picture was CL too with 500 hours on it.   It's not the only one.   I have another like that one that I got with 50 hours on it.  For this project, I just made all that cross bracing for the scaffolds because they wanted $18 each.  It cost me about $5 each to make those.   All this lumber, including the scaffold planks were sawed on my mill, also found on CL.  The Toyota was given to me, as was my Honda Civic, by people who appreciated help I had given them.   I don't mind doin' it on the cheap. 

 

Past my bedtime.  Gotta hit it again in the morning.


Edited by Alder Logs, 17 August 2017 - 12:47 AM.

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#149 Alder Logs

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 10:20 PM

Yesterday; tore down and rebuilt the north side scaffolds. 

 

gallery_131808_1489_75386.jpg

 

A neighbor helped me get the trusses up on top.

 

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The first three trusses in place and nailed.

 

gallery_131808_1489_74575.jpg

 

Well, I sure am learning that I don't really know what I am doing here.  I learned that this is definitely a two person, two nail gun, job.  Wrasling the trusses into place and shooting nails while trying to hold stuff in place was a challenge.   Thirteen more trusses to set, and I could sure use a hand. 


Edited by Alder Logs, 18 August 2017 - 10:25 PM.

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#150 Alder Logs

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Posted Yesterday, 03:35 PM

This morning I got another 5 trusses up.   I am putting the gable end trusses in the middle and will do some blocking and trusswork between them and attach them to the center beam, so it can be used to hoist very heavy stuff if needs be.   This way, it will be like the two trusses and the beam are all one structure.  Should be way strong.  

 

So, eight trusses in place, and eight to go.   

 

I have bought two framing nailers off Craigslist, a Porter-Cable and a Senco.   I bought the second one because the Senco constantly jammed, and I guessed that's why it was sold by a guy who worked for a contractor who said they had upgraded to a stronger model Senco, and his boss gave it to him.   If one thinks about it, no way would a contractor get rid of a nailer that worked well.   The Porter-Cable has worked flawlessly, while I had quit even trying to use the Senco.   I have a Senco roofing nailer (from the same guy {for only $20 [the framer was $80]} and it works fine).  I  inherited a Senco stapler, and bought a Craigslist Senco finish nailer, and all of these have worked well.  It has only been the framer that had issues.   When I bought the Porter-Cable, the guy tossed in a half case of nails that are Hitachi brand.   I was running something called, "Grip Rite" from Home Depot and getting the jams. There seems to be a difference in the plastic that holds the nails together.

 

So today, after so many trips up and down the scaffods and ladders, packing that heavy nail gun, I decided to risk the Senco on one side and the Porter-Cable on the other.   Five trusses put up and no jams.   the Senco is still problematic, in that it tends often to do a double tap when I pull the trigger.  If memory serves, that was how it used to jam with the Grip Rite nails.   So, with two nailers on the job, things have been made much easier.  The remaining eight trusses are without the notches I let in for the boards that will carry the flying rafters on the ends.    So, I hope I get the rest up today.  

 

gallery_131808_1489_88745.jpg


Edited by Alder Logs, Yesterday, 03:46 PM.

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#151 Alder Logs

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Posted Yesterday, 08:18 PM

Had one easy to clear jam with the Senco, and I had them all nailed in by 5:30. 

 

gallery_131808_1489_52604.jpg

 

gallery_131808_1489_169138.jpg


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#152 Arathu

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Posted Yesterday, 10:21 PM

Sweet......i always love it once the trusses/rafters are up..... it really starts looking like a building...........very nice!

 

With a set of stair gauges on my framing square and my little blue book of roof building I cut rafters myself.......I'd like to build another building for my mushrooms actually.....

 

Good stuff Alder!

 


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