Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Edible Tree Bark


  • Please log in to reply
46 replies to this topic

#21 Alder Logs

Alder Logs

    ૐ शान्तिः शान्तिः शान्तिः ૐ

  • Moderator
  • 13,077 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 07 January 2013 - 01:43 PM


Is poplar popular there?

For a couple of seasons, long ago, me and my ex picked Douglas fir
(Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii) cones for the Simpson Timber Co. Our mode of operation was to walk around until we found where a Douglas red squirrel had cut all the cones from a tree and simply steal them from the squirrel. (I am an asshole.) The seeds are small but plentiful in the cones, and I wanted to see what the attraction this food had for the squirrels. So, I ate one tiny seed. It was like drinking turpentine. Yum.

I thought I would just save anyone else the empirical research.



  • wildedibles likes this

#22 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 07 January 2013 - 06:15 PM

lol I have tried a few too i would agree very strong with resins lol
I do not like the big pine nuts you can buy either some people just love them

I am going to be moving on to Birch trying to group the trees together cannot go back and edit them in the right spaces yet anyway but Popular ya I get a link they are grouped many different ones here I collect the buds from Aspen the larger leafed ones here cause the sap is thick on them easy to collect lots from a tree that fell during a storm
if a tree doesnt fall I take some buds off this tree some off that the bark is used medicinally as well Aspirin like
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Populus

:) this group with the Birtch trees go into the Alders
"in the family Betulaceae, which also includes alders, hazels, and hornbeams, and is closely related to the beech/oak family, Fagaceae." cool :)
Some of this is very new to me too unless bringing in the fire wood counts ;) lol

I also want to get into mushrooms that grow on the wood too
and there are only a few mushrooms that I have found that grow on spruce I will find a link to that cause i have no idea where my pic is of it grrr....

http://en.wikipedia....topsis_pinicola

http://mykoweb.com/C...s_palmatus.html

I have found both these mushrooms growing on downed spruce logs

Edited by wildedibles, 07 January 2013 - 06:23 PM.


#23 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 09 January 2013 - 06:10 AM

I just found this reading around thought it was neat ....
http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Birch_bark

"Birch bark or birchbark is the bark of several Eurasian and North American birch trees of the genus Betula.

The strong and water-resistant cardboard-like bark can be easily cut, bent, and sewn, which made it a valuable building, crafting, and writing material, since pre-historic times. Even today birch bark remains a popular type of wood for various handicrafts and arts.
Birch bark also contains substances of medicinal and chemical interest. Some of those products (such as betulin) also have fungicidal properties that help preserve bark artifacts, as well as food preserved in bark containers."
...
"Birch bark was a valuable construction material in any part of the world where birch trees were available. Containers like wrappings, bags, baskets, boxes, or quivers were made by most societies well before pottery was invented[citation needed]. Other uses include:


Birch bark also makes an outstanding tinder, as the inner layers will stay dry even through heavy rainstorms. To render birch bark useless as tinder, it must be soaked for an extended period of time."

http://en.wikipedia....azinibaganjigan
"Mazinibaganjigan (plural: mazinibaganjiganan) is an ancient folk art made by the Ojibwe (Anishinaabe), Cree and other Algonquian peoples who use birch bark, by biting down on small pieces of birch bark to form intricate designs.[1] It is also known as mazinashkwemaganjigan(-an) (by Northwestern Ontario Ojibwe) and ozhibaganjigan(-an) (by Wisconsin Ojibwe). In English, this has been described either as "Birch bark bitings" or "Birch bark transparencies." Using the eyeteeth to bite, the bite pressures can either pierce the bark pieces into a lace or just make certain areas thinner to allow for light to pass through.[2] If the bark piece is carefully folded, symmetrical designs can also be made onto it.[3] Many of the designs that are used contain symbological and religious significance to the Ojibwa. Though the practice almost died out, there are an estimated dozen practitioners left in Canada and the United States, some of whom display the craft in contexts outside of their original intentions to show evidence of this ancient practice. Birch bark bitings can be used in storytelling, as patterns for quillwork and beadwork, as well as finished pieces of art."

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Wiigwaasabak
"Wiigwaasabak
(Ojibwe language, plural: wiigwaasabakoon) are birch bark scrolls, on which the Ojibwa (Anishinaabe) people of North America wrote complex geometrical patterns and shapes. When used specifically for Midewiwin ceremonial use, these scrolls are called mide-wiigwaas. These enabled the memorization of complex ideas, and passing along history and stories to succeeding generations. Several such scrolls are in museums, including one on display at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, DC. In addition to birchbark, copper and slate may have also been used, along with hides, pottery, and other artifacts. Some archaeologists are presently trying to determine the exact origins, dates, and locations of their use. Many scrolls were hidden away in caves and underground man-made pits."

Edited by wildedibles, 09 January 2013 - 07:19 AM.


#24 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:46 AM

Birch ... with other mixed trees in the area this is a swampy area

IMG_2399.JPG

IMG_2421.JPG

There are some that are more red pink than white I dont know know if they will all be white as they get bigger or what ? These are young trees around the trail edges I do not go further in the woods in this area a lot of swamp and ditch crick areas ;)

close ups of the red and white ones
IMG_2397.JPG

IMG_2400.JPG

A close up of the buds an old leaf that's holding on
the twig branches bark is different more Alder looking
IMG_2402.JPG


Alder
This is the type of Alder we have here I remember my Dad telling me they are Tag Alders something like that they are snags when cleaning wet areas up hard to remove them
they rot here too growing in wet areas they tend to rot quickly too but they will grow well in cricks small little rivers and ditch areas once they get there they will never get them out they rot quick but they just grow from the roots which do not rot as easy I guess
You can cut them all back in early spring but by the end of summer looks like you never did a thing lol
IMG_2390.JPG

IMG_2384.JPG
Birch bark and Alder they are really close dark with white spots :)

IMG_2379.JPG

Cant remember but one cone is female and one cone is male

IMG_2387.JPG
I just looked this one up its name is Tag Alder :)

Alnus serrulata (tag alder)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alder

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMG_2500.JPG
  • IMG_2377.JPG
  • IMG_2378.JPG
  • IMG_2380.JPG
  • IMG_2381.JPG
  • IMG_2382.JPG
  • IMG_2385.JPG
  • IMG_2386.JPG
  • IMG_2403.JPG
  • IMG_2406.JPG
  • IMG_2422.JPG
  • IMG_2440.JPG
  • IMG_2447.JPG
  • IMG_2497.JPG
  • IMG_2498.JPG
  • IMG_2499.JPG

Edited by wildedibles, 09 January 2013 - 12:45 PM.


#25 Erkee

Erkee

    Trolls'R'us

  • Expired Member
  • 1,477 posts

Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:50 PM

try lighting a birch cone and then blow it out to smoulder, the smoke is quite a treat :)
i think your pink birch is probably birch in youth - although i've seen a pink fungal blush on poplar bark
actual 'Pink Birch' leaves (not sure about buds) rubbed give a wintergreen aroma, very scarce up here, friend has found two oldies, there are a few documented stands in ontario.

#26 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:58 PM

I am in Ontario so ya they could be different or the same ....
I noticed some young ones are white and some pink too like tiny ones
this area could have been planted too as they are all small trees ruffly same age
but all mixed so they could have naturally started by what was around b4

#27 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:27 AM

Ok I had a nice talk with my Dad last night :)
He is a bush guy worked in the park for most of his adult life cutting down trees, making roads and filling up log trucks or gravel trucks anyway he knows his trees
He said that the pink red birch I have found will turn yellow as it grows and the Silver Birch I seen he says its Yellow Birch when it is older
The white Birch around here only grows about 28" around b4 it dies back but the Yellow Birch are the Big ones around here
The big one I see is a beautiful tree I will be adding some pictures of this one as soon as I go for the long walk needed in the snow to get there it is worth it it is a huge beauty :) I like laying in the snow looking up at how huge it is taking pictures that way look sooo cool :)

Now he did talk with me about the Spruce too clearing some things up that I would like to add
He said that the swamp spruce is Black Spruce and the others that are around out of the swamp areas is White Spruce :)

I talked to him a bit about how I am learning about different edible barks he laughed raight away lmao " you are not a beaver he said " lol oh man ....
I told him how I tried Spruce bark and it was terrible he got a good laugh then I said "remember when you and grandpa told me that the sap was gum ?" He laughed some more I think he remembers well :)
he has been feeling down recently so I am really glad I could make him laugh ;)

#28 benderislord

benderislord

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 844 posts

Posted 11 January 2013 - 05:44 PM

thanks for the name dude
my memory chips were overheating that night :hookah:
there are MANY wonderful uses for barks and other tree products
i have had the sap gums before and they are really nice though a dental nightmare
later on when it comes time to brush up lol or maybe that was just me
personally i wouldnt consume cherry barks in any amounts but thats just me
but im very glad to see this subject come up on the forum for sure :)
recently been looking into tanning leathers using various admixtures of tannic acids
from various species for different results and sadly so far all i can find are old word
of mouth recipes from locals i bump into

#29 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 11 January 2013 - 06:10 PM

I remember reading about tanning ....
I cannot remember what
it is difficult to do it without the use of strong chemicals but there is more physical work and stretching and beating etc...
If I remember I will add it I think barks can be used if not leaves for tannins but there is other things too
ammonia is also used in tanning...
as I said if I remember what or where i read I will add it :)

I like the inter active part of these threads other real persons talking about experiences with these substances not just me ;) thanks for your interest bud :)

#30 Alder Logs

Alder Logs

    ૐ शान्तिः शान्तिः शान्तिः ૐ

  • Moderator
  • 13,077 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 11 January 2013 - 11:12 PM

I think both alder and hemlock make good tanbark.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanbark

#31 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 12 January 2013 - 05:12 AM

Ya I remember now Alder has lots of tannins

thanks Alder Logs :)

I also remember the bark on the Alders here need to be aged b4 they make good medicine ... memory is sooo bad some days....

#32 benderislord

benderislord

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 844 posts

Posted 12 January 2013 - 07:11 PM

ok thanks for a direction to search further into folks
i know the traditional methods of making fine leathers
but without the right wood pith to smolder it kinda
falls short on quality so i have been looking into
tannic acids from various organic sources as the best ways
to maybe substitute for the smoking of hides
the brain admixture works fine and you do have to work the hides hard
to get a fine level of softness im mostly looking for general leather application
not clothing quality
1 old timer told me they used to rake up hard wood leaves and boil them
in an old stew kettle for a day then drain and do it again and again
then they would mix it all together and boil it down and they would paint
the hides with it before the brain wash while stretched and it made some good leathers
  • wildedibles likes this

#33 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 13 January 2013 - 06:01 AM

Leaves are full of tannins
Leaves are what colors the rivers and lakes brown water is brown from all the tannins like tea for example :)

but without the right wood pith to smolder it kinda
falls short on quality so i have been looking into
tannic acids from various organic sources as the best ways
to maybe substitute for the smoking of hides

right wood pith ? what wood r u looking for ?

ok what kinds of woods do you have around leaves are kinda out of the question? I know for me they are lol

I think the smoking part is part of the stretching too right may have to still smoke them
if they are falling apart that does not make any sense either ....


I always wanted to make my own hides but I am not a hunter and no hunter i have ever talked to will let me have a hide ... lol I would look funny asking for the brains too lmao
see hunters here take the hide to the ministry of natural resources MNR they give it to the native people so they can use them.... the hunter gets a hat lol

man I need to start hunting lol ....

#34 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 11 February 2013 - 04:30 AM

So forgive me if I sounded rude trying to keep this thread organized it is not needed :)

So lets talk bark .... mushrooms and the trees they grow on

I wanted this bark thread help us learn about the different textures of bark and help identifying bark so we can therefore identify the mushrooms that grow on a dead log somewhere with no leaves or branches for that matter :)

So lets learn about some trees ;)

I went on a walk with my boys yesterday and took some really cool pictures ;)

IMG_3595.JPG

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMG_3601.JPG
  • IMG_3548.JPG
  • IMG_3549.JPG
  • IMG_3550.JPG
  • IMG_3551.JPG
  • IMG_3552.JPG
  • IMG_3553.JPG
  • IMG_3554.JPG
  • IMG_3555.JPG
  • IMG_3558.JPG
  • IMG_3562.JPG
  • IMG_3563.JPG


#35 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:28 AM

IMG_3542.JPG
Here are some pictures of white Birch trees

Here is a Yellow Birch tree with some poly pores
IMG_3571.JPG

IMG_3577.JPG

IMG_3572.JPG
http://en.wikipedia....mes_fomentarius

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMG_3543.JPG
  • IMG_3540.JPG
  • IMG_3588.JPG
  • IMG_3567.JPG
  • IMG_3568.JPG
  • IMG_3570.JPG
  • IMG_3581.JPG
  • IMG_3584.JPG

Edited by wildedibles, 13 February 2013 - 06:56 AM.


#36 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 13 February 2013 - 07:29 AM

http://botit.botany....gi/dec2001.html
some more neat info ;)

#37 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 13 March 2013 - 06:45 AM

Took my youngest boy in the woods yesterday :)
We seen some pretty neat stuff ;)

IMG_5324.JPG :) My new collecting purse ;) This purse is made out of this hoof mushroom that is in the bag cut and pounded to make fabric I am interested in this idea and collected some Hoof fungi to see how we can do this ;) This purse was donated by a kind friend :) Thanks :)


I thought this was really neat there are deer prints and poop around this spot so I checked it out and it looks like they were eating this Birch Polypore I picked it up and it was really soft like a spounge so they could be eating it ?....
IMG_5365.JPG
They couldnt reach this one ;) But for future notes I will not collect this mushroom in the deers reach now to make sure that the deer have access to this spring food source ;)
IMG_5366.JPG
They were also eating the lichen on this fallen dead tree
IMG_5370.JPG

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMG_5351.JPG
  • IMG_5357.JPG
  • IMG_5359.JPG


#38 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 31 March 2013 - 05:49 AM

IMG_5422.JPG
Here is a hoof fungi one on the right is peeled with a sharp paring knife

IMG_5421.JPG
After it is peeled u can cut it into slices
IMG_5414.JPG
The sliced dark ones have been soaking in water and they have all the pore material removed

There is only a small amount of material without the spore tubes and this is the stuff that can be pounded to make material or it can be used to dry flys for fly fishing. It is very absorbent material soaks up water very fast drying what ever u wipe ;)

When I soaked the material I used wood ashes mixed in the water
after it soaks you can pound it out with a hammer a rubber mallet probably work better the metal hammer made holes if pounded too much

I also learned that when you soak the fungi it is easier to remove the spore tubes they sort of fall apart from the rest of the fungi

This material has been used for band aids ... something to keep in mind when in the woods camping or something it is very absorbent and probably has medicinal properties ;)

I will update this when I try again practice makes perfect :)
I have collected a few more pieces and when I can get deeper in the woods I can get some more of this interesting fungi ;)

http://en.wikipedia....mes_fomentarius
"Main article: Amadou
The species is well known for its uses in making fire. This species, as well as others, such as Phellinus igniarius, can be used to make amadou, a tinder.[22] Amadou is produced from the flesh of the fruit bodies.[13] The young fruit bodies are soaked in water before being cut into strips, and are then beaten and stretched, separating the fibres. The resulting material is referred to as "red amadou".[22] The addition of gunpowder or nitre produced an even more potent tinder.[13][22] The flesh was further used to produce clothing, including caps, gloves and breeches.[12] Amadou was used medicinally by dentists, who used it to dry teeth, and surgeons, who used it as a styptic. It is still used today in fly fishing for drying the flies.[23] Other items of clothing and even picture frames and ornaments have been known to be made from the fungus in Europe, particularly Bohemia.[24] The fungus is known to have been used as a firestarter in Hedeby,[13] and it is known that the fungus was used as early as 3000 BCE. When found, the 5,000-year-old Ötzi the Iceman was carrying four pieces of F. fomentarius fruit body.[25] Chemical tests led to the conclusion that he carried it for use as tinder.[26]"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amadou

http://www.primitive...ubstitutes.html
"Well, I clearly had fallen in love with the stuff. It has a tactile appeal that makes you want to carry it around with you and rub it on your face"
(lol I have rubbed it on my face it is soooo soft u feel it with your fingers then onto the face it feels so nice ;))

quote from the above link too
"However, this tube portion can be cut up and used as the wick of a fat lamp. Jose likes to use olive oil as the fuel. He says the amadou wick never burns up."

I would like to try and use the spore tubes as a wick for oil lamps I think that be really neat :)

I tried to use the waste from peeling it and the tubes for starting fire in my wood stove it works great ... it will smolder but blowing on it the fire catches easily ;)
I threw it on the coals of the fire blew on it a little and I had flames again :)

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMG_5425.JPG
  • IMG_5416.JPG
  • IMG_5417.JPG
  • IMG_5419.JPG
  • IMG_5420.JPG
  • IMG_5423.JPG
  • IMG_5424.JPG

Edited by wildedibles, 31 March 2013 - 06:17 AM.

  • Erkee likes this

#39 wildedibles

wildedibles

    Naturalist

  • OG VIP
  • 8,040 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 31 March 2013 - 06:25 AM

Posted Image
Here are 2 pieces that have been soaked the one on the left has been pounded thinner and the other hasnt been pounded yet they were cut the same width
there is not much useable material in the fungi but pounding it makes it bigger and thinner so that is a neat trick to get the piece bigger ;)

Posted Image
u can see here that the useable layer is very thin on some fungi the tubes cannot be pounded into a useable material they break apart ...
but taking them out and using them as a wick is very neat idea
they will also burn in a fire so all pieces of this mushroom can be used and not wasted I like that idea too ;)

This fungi is a fungi that will grow on a tree for years each new spore row would represent a year of growth so u can count how many years it has been growing for ;)
So the above mushroom would be 3-4 years old ;)

#40 Spooner

Spooner

    Horney Toad

  • Black VIP
  • 2,752 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 15 April 2013 - 05:13 PM

Very interesting thanks. It feels so soft, I love the way amadou smells like mushrooms but feels like suede.




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!