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Edible Tree Bark


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#41 wildedibles

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 03:28 AM

It is true when u feel it u have to rub it on your cheek it is sooo soft ;) I read someone else saying that too so I know its not just me ;)
I think this is a natural resource when I first started playing with this I found a mis formed poly pore didnt know what it was but I peeled it and cut it and it was corkey inside and I thought wow Canadian cork ;)
now knowing all the things that can be done with this material now it is really cool glad I had the opportunity to bring back a resource that is so old and was very important to people living along time ago and could be very important to us now too ;)

#42 Erkee

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 01:53 PM

edit: too experimental..
....

wonderful thread wilde


Edited by Erkee, 18 April 2013 - 02:53 PM.


#43 wildedibles

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:29 AM

I found something interesting yesterday and wanted to share it with all of you ;)
Here are some birch trees with hoof fungi growing on them
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The one to the left is growing on a branch on the ground.

The one to the right is a deformed growth of the same fungi I think hoof fungi Fomes fomentarius.

It has no pore surface cause it is growing from a stump on the ground spreading this way instead of blowing spores around?

There is no air flow from under this deformed mushroom and I have let this grow watching it for at least a year.
I took a piece off b4 and then let it grow more, very interesting mushroom.
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Here is close up pictures of the deformed one..

At first I thought it was an Artist conk Ganoderma applanatum,
but the material inside is an exact match to Amadou, so it could be a hoof fungi ;)

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Close up of where I removed the outer shell ... it is easier to peel when it is wet compared to dry big difference ;)

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Need to practice with my knife ;) Any pointers to get a smooth surface using knife strokes .... I am bad cutting towards myself ;) and had tiny cuts on my thumb last time when it was dry.

I used a cleaver instead of my hatchet to remove it from the tree :) worked great ... need to practice my aim :) pretty close tho. Once u hit it once then u can pry it away from the wood, this is the advantage I found with the cleaver.....

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These hoofs have grown weird cause the tree was growing up right with these mushrooms on it then the tree fell.
Now that it is on the ground they are growing in a different position ... there fore the sun does have a lot to do with the way mushrooms grow ...their direction in life anyway just like plants :)
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One other thing to note about this mushroom it will grow on alive trees?
and trees that are dead and standing
and logs that have fell and are laying on the ground or sticks for that matter.
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The pore surface above didnt get a clear picture yet
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Top and bottom view I am going to practice cutting the other pieces.
I don't want to waste this large piece, I could do many things with a piece this big.
Cant stop thinking about ways to get this to grow now.
And how this mushroom reminds me of Reshi ;)
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No pore surface stuck in the ground frozen actually growing on fallen bark, dirt and moss. No air flow, another hint to how mushrooms grow ;)

Kitty likes the mushrooms too ;) I find animals do want to play with them ;)
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Edited by wildedibles, 24 April 2013 - 09:40 AM.


#44 stoffel

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 10:17 AM

this is an awesome thread! (i love your amadou collecting bag @wildedibles)
for food in the north, its is mainly meat, but plants and trees have verry high value in health benefits.
(pine needle tea would contain more vit c then lemons!) nothing better then cut of and shop some needles and make tea on the spot!


edit, for tinder, i cook and soak the amadou in water with ashes from a fire. after that pounding with a hammer.
smokes and glows, no flame, but verry good for catching a spark.
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#45 AMCPHERSON

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Posted 14 April 2017 - 12:01 PM

I recently read in a Medicinal Plants book that some Native tribes believed the inner bark of spruce could CURE stomach problems. I'd like to try this, but as I am new to harvesting and making wild teas etc, I want to make sure that I know how to do this properly, and how much to use as I've also read that too much can be a bad thing. Does anyone have a recipe for making tea from the inner bark of Spruce? I have Black, White and Blue Spruce in the area. I've made teas from Yarrow, Cedar and Clover before, but that is the extent of my knowledge here. Tips and tricks? Any help would be much appreciated! 


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#46 GLP

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 11:28 AM

Interesting topic that must be read slower to digest more, thank you all for sharing your knowledge.


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#47 wildedibles

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 01:35 PM

I recently read in a Medicinal Plants book that some Native tribes believed the inner bark of spruce could CURE stomach problems. I'd like to try this, but as I am new to harvesting and making wild teas etc, I want to make sure that I know how to do this properly, and how much to use as I've also read that too much can be a bad thing. Does anyone have a recipe for making tea from the inner bark of Spruce? I have Black, White and Blue Spruce in the area. I've made teas from Yarrow, Cedar and Clover before, but that is the extent of my knowledge here. Tips and tricks? Any help would be much appreciated!


Sorry for not getting back to you ...I have not made any myself ....and havent look edit up for anyone .....I will look into it to see dosage for tes..... some of the needle trees can be very strong a little go along way ....Ive used spruce needles in tea and I just use a small twig the new ones are best but in middle of winter the older ones is the ones you can harvest ....maybe buds in winter




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