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Are the weeds in your yard nutritional food


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#1 wildedibles

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 06:15 AM

The land that u sleep on
walk around
work
gather
spread
visit
was all meant to be

The secrete free nutritious food is the
weeds we tread apon

The weeds that do well in our yards and thrive are there
for a reason we try and remove kill poison but until we love them and not fight them then we will see the wisdom in the plants that thrive around us

I have been looking at weeds in my friends yards and well some of the weeds would be nutritious to some of the members in that family

it was actually very close
now warning some weeds are toxic so do not go eating stuff u don't know read up get help identifying if necessary
asking someone if u r right is better than doing it on your own ;) I usually get friends to look at the similarities with me and see if something is right b4 eating so go over it with us and friends around u b4 munching on unknown plants in the yard
there is much info on the internet about almost all the plants out there so look into the benefits and cautions about each plant and medications you are taking talk to your doctor and or pharmacist they can help ;)

So recap

Are the weeds in your yard nutritional food for you or another member of the family?
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#2 wildedibles

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 07:09 AM

Here is an example ;)

These seeds were collected yesterday I collected 2 more bags as well
A friend has lots of trouble with this and his long haired dogs so I helped him out by collecting these seeds to plant and use as medicine
trying to cut the numbers down this plant spreads like a weed
I offered to collect it for many medicinal purposes for me and others the list of things this plant can help is amazing
IMG_6829.JPG
This plant was growing on 3 properties and it would benefit 2 of them lol the one that it annoys the most would probably benefit from its medicine the most including the dog ;) lol just prepared a different way that's all

Here is some great info I just found on this plant :)
http://keys2liberty..../arctium-minus/
there is more info but here is some of the medicinal and food uses

"Edible Uses: Root – raw or cooked. The best roots are obtained from young plants. Usually peeled and sliced. The roasted root is a coffee substitute. Young leaves and leaf stems – raw or cooked. Used as a potherb. Mucilaginous. It is best to remove the rind from the stem. Young flowering stem – peeled and eaten raw or cooked like asparagus. Seed sprouts.
Medicinal Uses: Burdock is one of the foremost detoxifying herbs in both Chinese and Western herbal medicine. Arctium lappa is the main species used, though this species has similar properties. The dried root of one year old plants is the official herb, but the leaves and fruits can also be used. It is used to treat conditions caused by an ‘overload’ of toxins, such as throat and other infections, boils, rashes and other skin problems. The root is thought to be particularly good at helping to eliminate heavy metals from the body. The plant is antibacterial, antifungal and carminative. It has soothing, mucilaginous properties and is said to be one of the most certain cures for many types of skin diseases, burns, bruises etc. It is used in the treatment of herpes, eczema, acne, impetigo, ringworm, boils, bites etc. The plant can be taken internally as an infusion, or used externally as a wash. Use with caution. One-year old roots are alterative, aperient, blood purifier, cholagogue, depurative, diaphoretic, diuretic and stomachic. The seed is alterative, antibacterial, antifungal, antiphlogistic, depurative, diaphoretic, diuretic and hypoglycaemic. It is used in the treatment of colds with sore throat and cough, measles, pharyngitis, acute tonsillitis and abscesses. The crushed seed is poulticed onto bruises. The seed is harvested in the summer and dried for later use. The seed contains arctiin, this excites the central nervous system producing convulsions an increase in respiration and later paralysis. It also lowers the blood pressure by dilating the blood vessels. The leaves are poulticed onto burns, ulcers and sores.
Foot Notes: all http://www.pfaf.org/...e=Arctium minus"

#3 opiwave668

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 11:52 AM

you have me thinking:neutral:

#4 Purple Mushroom Tip

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 12:38 PM

BUT, what about all the nasty chemicals used on residential properties. Eating from your front lawn is different then a farm field.

#5 wildedibles

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 05:43 PM

I agree I have not used poison in my yard for a very long time but others may still be spraying their lawns to get rid of the weeds just so they can go to the store and possibly buy the same thing in a pill ;)

Some people take the poison spray warning down so please do not eat from other peoples lawns

If u r the type to kill your weeds take a moment and look them up :) I think you would be surprised
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#6 Purple Mushroom Tip

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 07:21 PM

I wish more people would stop spraying chemicals to kill everything, we stopped a long time ago.

#7 MYndsetNebula

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 08:48 PM

The land that u sleep on
walk around
work
gather
spread
visit
was all meant to be

The secrete free nutritious food is the
weeds we tread apon


"We've got to get ourselves back to the garden" Joni Mitchell, woodstock


The conundrum of it all is we never left the garden, we just seemed to forget it's true value and our connection to it, decided to exploit and pave it instead. The garden is still there, we are still on it, perhaps we have to get our mindset back to the garden, a simple perspective change.

Great post wildedibles

#8 Arathu

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 09:18 PM

We are built from the ground around us, for sure I think it's nice to share the same construction as the Earth I live on.......I care for the soil and it cares for me.........deal!

:hugs:

Oh yeah......I have a ton of Burdock all around me.
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#9 Yodambo

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 10:36 PM

Made soup from stinging nettles growing in my backyard, I did. Yummy, it was ;)
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#10 aliendreamtime

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 10:53 PM

Thanks for sharing wildedibles!

I just saw a beautiful poster at a University that had a handful of wild edibles. The presenter made a very good point - wild plants are often more nutritious than crops bread for monoculture, because the monoculture crops are bred to grow well and be big, but they arent bread to be nutritious!

Then, later that day, I saw that the restaurant I was eating at was serving fiddleheads. Man were they good!

I am into ID'ing and collecting wild plants but I've only ever done it for medicine, not for food. But hey, if you just eat mild medicine all day every day, you're bound to be awfully healthy!

I'm sold. I'll be collecting many a wild edible this season!

Thanks again.

#11 Sickmanlives

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 11:56 PM

We used to make dandelion wine every summer, gallons upon gallons, very tasty and smooth (clean).
I had a cat named Amadeus many years ago, that cat would always come home with those cockle-burs all over it's coat.
Spent many a night drinking dandelion wine and cutting that out of it's fur. Good times.
Thanks for the memories :)
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#12 wildedibles

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 04:48 AM

I wish more people would stop spraying chemicals to kill everything, we stopped a long time ago.


We stopped using even bug spray on stuff a few years ago and we had Cardinal birds this year never seen them b4 but this winter they were around ;) .... They eat dead or injured or asleep beetles if the beetles were sprayed with poison they wouldnt have found a spot to eat in my yard this winter ;) That was worth it to me

"We've got to get ourselves back to the garden" Joni Mitchell, woodstock


The conundrum of it all is we never left the garden, we just seemed to forget it's true value and our connection to it, decided to exploit and pave it instead. The garden is still there, we are still on it, perhaps we have to get our mindset back to the garden, a simple perspective change.

Great post wildedibles


:) I see many weeds breaking threw that pavement every day growing beside roads sidewalks
Where I picked the burdock it was an abandoned house for maybe 5 years now and the weeds have taken over this attracts wild animals and thus returns the ruble to forest again ;)
Weeds rule ;)

Thanks for sharing wildedibles!

I just saw a beautiful poster at a University that had a handful of wild edibles. The presenter made a very good point - wild plants are often more nutritious than crops bread for monoculture, because the monoculture crops are bred to grow well and be big, but they arent bread to be nutritious!

Then, later that day, I saw that the restaurant I was eating at was serving fiddleheads. Man were they good!

I am into ID'ing and collecting wild plants but I've only ever done it for medicine, not for food. But hey, if you just eat mild medicine all day every day, you're bound to be awfully healthy!

I'm sold. I'll be collecting many a wild edible this season!

Thanks again.


Big and store well on the shelf with the best colors so people would choose them ;)
Some big fancy restraunts are catching on to the wild food craze and this is a great thing
lol I have been watching the travel channel and many restraurants around the world are heading this way
cause the food is more nutritious better flavor petals in salad look neat and taste great ;)

I love wild collecting food I grew up a berry collector with the women in my family this opened the doors for me to look into wild plant material for medicine then I noticed how all these weeds most of them were brought here from Europe when we all migrated here. They were important to bring for food we already used some of these plants for food in Europe for us and our animals .... burs who knows they could have brought themselves in animal fur they are so smart hitching a ride to a new land in fur ;) ... take the bur out of the animal fur and the seeds split open and fling every where ;)

Thanks sooo much for all the interest and help I really want to teach people about these long forgotten food sources
and I agree mild medicine eaten for food would help us to be more healthy ;)

I believe these foods are medicine because our bodys were meant to eat this as food c this food is medicine cause it is our food
we need this nutrition in our bodys for them to work right

#13 wildedibles

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 04:59 PM

IMG_6901.JPG



https://mycotopia.ne...yone-eaten.html

#14 wildedibles

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 05:10 PM

Here is another example ;) My friend has tried and tried to rid her garden of this flower :)

She still wants some but she doesnt want it taking over her yard.

This is where it has me thinking and I read up on this plant and its medicinal uses and it fits perfect with some medical issues she has been having.

It would fit for good food for her oldest child as well which he is an adult himself.

This is what happens when I look in my friends yard and help them with their gardens I see weeds take over some more than other and some have many the same.
But the ones that are taking over or they are fighting with is the ones the medicine is needed the most.

If it was only so easy for people to try new food. I understand the fears in wild or weed food who knows what it is same as mushroom when it doubt throw it out.

Its a shame really and this is why I want to teach people what is safe to eat and what is not and how to prepare it use it keep it longer and how to use all thoes pesky weeds for free nutritious food ;) well maybe that's the dangerous part so shhhhh ;)
Nutritious food should be something we all have in this world not just the privileged.

Making new food taste better is easy with spreading knowledge of how we all use it and share is around :)
Posted Image


Here is my thread on this bountiful North American Native Flower
https://mycotopia.ne...yone-eaten.html

Edited by wildedibles, 30 April 2013 - 05:15 PM.


#15 Spooner

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 05:11 PM

We used to make dandelion wine every summer, gallons upon gallons, very tasty and smooth (clean).
I had a cat named Amadeus many years ago, that cat would always come home with those cockle-burs all over it's coat.
Spent many a night drinking dandelion wine and cutting that out of it's fur. Good times.
Thanks for the memories :)


Got a good dandelion wine recipe?

#16 wildedibles

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 05:49 PM

https://mycotopia.ne...91272-mead.html
I made this wine here with dandelions it didnt turn out but the year b4 it did I will be making that again for sure better recipes and advice would be much appreciated ;)
https://mycotopia.ne...-dandelion.html

Dandelions is another big weed some try and kill but looking closer it would be great medicine for them food tho not just a medicine a whole food that has vitamins and minerals from the earth in which it grew :)

#17 Sickmanlives

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 07:05 PM

Dandelion Wine

Early in the morning when the dew is on the flowers, pick one gallon of opened dandelion blossoms.
Some just pick the caps which will work as well, we always just picked the whole thing by the root.


Put the flowers in a two gallon or larger open crock and pour boiling water over them.
Cover the crock with cheesecloth and let it sit at room temperature for three days.

Then squeeze all the juice outta the flowers, throw them away and save the liquid.

Put the liquid into a big pot and add:
3 lbs. sugar
4 lemons, juice, skin, seeds, etc., all chopped up.
4 oranges, chopped
You could substitute sugar with brown sugar, honey or whatever else you use instead of. I always just used sugar.

Boil mixture for 30 minutes with top on pot, cool to lukewarm, pour into crock and add 2 packages or tablespoons of yeast.
Cover with cheesecloth and let brew sit for two or three weeks until the bubbling stops.

Pour into glass, open mouth and enjoy.
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#18 Spooner

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 07:26 PM

Great, Thanks, I will try that next week, got to let the bees collect some pollen first to get their season going.

Will probably try it with sugar first, I think brown sugar or honey might overpower the flowers.

#19 Sickmanlives

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 07:35 PM

I concur, I like honey but, I personally think it would be way too much for the wine.
I mean you can tweak it to your liking, I just don't think it would taste the same.

I bought a bottle of wine one night for Walrus and I. It was a red peppery wine.
I wish I would have wrote the name of that down, because I can't remember or remember what it was labeled.

#20 Spooner

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 07:44 PM

I have made some spiced honey wines that are so strong they are almost like a Port Wine.
Raw honey can be very full flavored not like the thin yellow stuff you get in stores.
I am guessing the dandelion wine is very light and delicate from the flowers.
I will know in a couple months once it is bottled and aged a bit.

Thanks for recipe!




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