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Are the weeds in your yard nutritional food


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#21 aliendreamtime

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 10:48 PM

If it was made with honey, wouldnt it be meade?

Is the purpose of the sugar to feed the the yeast?

#22 wildedibles

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 06:54 AM

Yes the yeast need sugar to make alcohol and CO2 ;)

I used some honey and sugar the 2nd time I think the 1st was just sugar
the 2nd time I think the yeast was too old didnt bubble at all ... or there wasnt enough sugars in there to feed the yeast but I really think it was old and possibly dead yeast

1st time I didnt cook really anything I was experimenting with wild yeast off the flowers and white sugar if I remember right some turned out really good and some turned to vinegar, vinegar still has its uses ;)

I was very happy to wake up this morning reading u all talk about the best weed of them all :)
Dandelions drive many people crazy I love how my lawn has a yellow season ;)

#23 opiwave668

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 10:41 PM

Dandelions drive many people crazy






:thumbup:
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#24 BKeith

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 10:27 AM

We learned a lot of this in Boy Scouts, as to what wild plants are edible, other than the obvious berries.

Many don't know that the common orange day lily, found often along country roads, is totally edible.

The young green shoots are good raw in salads, and the later leaves can be boiled.
The stamen is sweet, the bloom full of nectar, and all edible.
The roots can be boiled or treated like potatoes.

Another is salsify, or the 'vegetable oyster'.
It is the one that produces huge "dandelion-like" puffs from the small orange flowers.
Treat the roots like potatoes. It pretty much looks like broad 'blade' grass with stems.

Another is purslane. Grows anywhere and everywhere. Highly nutritious.
Paddle-like leaves on red stems. Looks like a mini jade plant, the common houseplant.
It is a member of the ornamental rose moss family.

Of course you can do Google image searches for these. When it sprouts here, late summer, I'll try to remember to post some images.


#25 Seeker2be

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 10:36 AM

My favorites are lambs quarters and purslane. The leaves of the lamb's quater (Chenopodium) are great steamed or in omelets. I love pickeled purslane especially using Euell Gibbon's recipe for the the Dilly pot in Stalking the Good life. Purslane is said to be a rare source of Omega 3 in the plant kingdom. The seeds of lamb's quarters are related to quinoa and have the protein of an egg. They make great navajo griddle cakes and lamb's quarter seed bread or crust for pizza!

#26 Baby Squid

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 03:03 PM

We learned a lot of this in Boy Scouts, as to what wild plants are edible, other than the obvious berries.

Many don't know that the common orange day lily, found often along country roads, is totally edible.

The young green shoots are good raw in salads, and the later leaves can be boiled.
The stamen is sweet, the bloom full of nectar, and all edible.
The roots can be boiled or treated like potatoes.


Some variants of the lilium family are anti-inflammatory and promote wound healing as well. The journal of ethnopharmacology posted a few articles about em in the last month or so.

I have been eating wild ones for the last week, since they are in bloom. Tasty and fun!

#27 BKeith

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 08:12 PM

The purslane is coming up!
PurslaneUp0713.jpg

#28 Seeker2be

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 10:33 PM

Ill post my recipe for pickled purslane in a few days. I am eating last years pickled purslane as this year's thrive in my garden.
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#29 wildedibles

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 04:13 AM

All great info thank you :)

I have forgotten about this thread since I just finished being sooo bussy in the gardens ;)

But this is the perfect timing to be reminded as the garden grows so do the weeds and weeds grow better most times than vegetables and sometimes more nutritious than the things we are trying to grow

Instead of tossing them to the side try reading up on some of them most garden weeds are edible not all but most ;)

Lambs Quarters If i remember right has more iron than spinach

purslane is really yummy ;)

and Lilly's I havent even tried mine yet heard you can make fritters from the bloom buds kinda like you could do with squash flowers ....

Thanks all for your help weeds are very important for me :)

#30 opiwave668

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 03:46 AM

i ate a flower before
it felt very weird to eat a flower
it was very peppery i cant remember what it was called
not at all the flavor i was expecting
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#31 wildedibles

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 04:50 AM

:) LMAO thanks for that bud .... I remember the first time my mom added flowers to the salad I looked at her as if she were insane you want me to eat that? lol
Some are really good taste like fruit or peppery spicy as you remember ;)
My fav flower to eat now is blue violets they kinda taste grapey and another is the flowers of my oregano I like them better than the leaf put that all over my meat b4 it cooks really yummy :)

#32 opiwave668

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 04:59 AM

i think they were red no salad just straight flowers and yea spicy/peppery wish i could remember what they were called

i guess i dont know what i expected them to taste like but not that
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#33 BKeith

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 10:16 AM

Ill post my recipe for pickled purslane in a few days. I am eating last years pickled purslane as this year's thrive in my garden.

This is going to sound weird but...
We have an old bathtub that I plant sweet potatoes in. Filled with potting soil and natural humus, etc.
This keeps the moles and mice and worms out of them, and to harvest, just kick it over and pick them up!
Last year, a purslane sprouted in it, and that sucker got about 1' tall by 3' wide! I was eating on that thing all season, 1 plant.

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#34 wildedibles

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 03:56 AM

:) Just kick it over eh? gotta love that
good use for an old bath tub too I had one in the yard for a long time thinking what am I gonna do with that;)?
someone seen it and wanted it theirs was way worse than the one I had so it left but many people get rid of big bath tubs and cannot get rid of them sometimes this is a great way to use what u have
Thing with sweet potatoes is they need to be warm early in the year I hear (black tarp or mulch on the ground to warm it up better in cooler climates this bath tub idea would definitely warm it up early being metal even a porcelain or cast iron would heat up and keep the heat in cause they are all insulated to keep the bath water warm ;)

great idea :)

and the point I am trying to make with some people :) that weed fed u little bits all summer and the potato in the winter

the weeds are just as important as the food we grow in that garden ... they can tell us lots about our gardens
what type of soil we have dry/hot spot or shady area gives us clues on what we can plant in that area

I have been collecting bladder campion, Silene vulgaris

a friend has lots in the lawn and trying to come up in the garden I have been picking it and leaving some on the ground in the garden as a mulch under veggies that are being eaten
it is related to the soap wort these contain sapions soap bugs do not like these types of plants

I picked lots so i used some as mulch and it is working great no more holes in the bean plants leaves :)

the rest I cooked up in a pot of water (they are edible I tried a few leaves they are yummy and nice texture) but I used some of this water to wash my hair with testing its effectiveness as a shampoo for people with sensitive skin ;)

the pot of water when stirred or even pouring the liquid off when cool had lots of bubbles on the top which broke quick but this is showing their might be sapions in this plant similar to the soap wort plants

Edited by wildedibles, 08 July 2013 - 04:11 AM.


#35 Yodambo

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 08:35 PM

i think they were red no salad just straight flowers and yea spicy/peppery wish i could remember what they were called


Nasturtium.

They go good in salads and sammiches.
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#36 wildedibles

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 04:34 AM

I was trying to think of it and couldnt think of any red flower used in salads beside roses lol
but ya nasturtiums would make perfect sense peppery ;) they are good and grow very nice
pretty, edible, probably nutritious ;)

I was just reading a ton on the family Silene

and the Saponins found in this plant have medicinal properties

https://www.dmt-nexu...x?g=posts&t=995

http://www.naturalme...der-campion.php

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silene

I dug an old text book out and read about the soaps (Saponin glycosides) found in different plants Ginseng, Licorice, reshi all contain these components I need to do more reading to make sense out of it all but I kinda understand what is happening :)

the soaps in some plants far more than we think have some of these components can help fight off viruses
some viruses protect themselves with a fatty protein coating that our body has issues breaking this coating down so it becomes a shield for the virus to keep on going and multiplying in our body's

these plants that contain small amounts of soap can break threw this coating like soap breaks the coating on the pans that we cook meat in breaking down all that fat and proteins... so our bodys can fight what is on the inside of this coating this is how I am understanding it anyway ..............

#37 opiwave668

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 10:09 PM

nasturtium
images.jpg
yep that was it
i found some old notes on edible flowers

it says not to consume more than a TBS of johhny jump ups
Contains saponins and may be toxic in large amounts. Tastes like: sweet to bland flavor
29.4.jpeg

#38 the dreamer

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 12:34 AM

My hyssop is blooming and the flowers are good as a cough syrup. The plant is over alll great for colds.

Honeysuckles are good for coughs, and feverish colds.

Then the dandelions are good this year. The leaves can be added to salads for a cleansing remedy and juicing the leaves are a great diuretic. The root can be made into a tincture for toxic conditions pike gout and acne. Also is a liver stimulator.

Your stinging nettle root can be made into a rinse that help dandruff and is a good conditioner.
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#39 wildedibles

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 05:43 AM

nasturtium
[ATTACH=CONFIG]313759[/ATTACH]
yep that was it
i found some old notes on edible flowers

it says not to consume more than a TBS of johhny jump ups
Contains saponins and may be toxic in large amounts. Tastes like: sweet to bland flavor
[ATTACH=CONFIG]313758[/ATTACH]


The saponins found in plants can be toxic in large amounts ....

I have eaten Johny jump ups they taste kinda like grapes the purple ones ate a few flowers no issues but don't eat a whole bowl full at one time .... saponins can be irritating to the digestive tract too much you can puke them out or the other way a bit later they will be purged from the system if u over indulge ;)

One thing I read in many books is that cancer cannot live in your blood if you eat johnny jump ups or violets (same family)
because it cleans your blood out soo good cancer cannot live in it
I have read this in about 4-5 books now old folk lore about why the flowers have worked I am not up to date on any recent research yet anyway ;)

I have been reading about bladder companion (Silene vulgaris) it has saponins in it too but it is suggested when you eat this plant to cook it cause all the saponins break down when cooking them

when I was making soap with this plant last year I wasnt having any luck cause I was cooking them and this was cooking all the soap out ;)

So this year I blended some leaves up in the blendor with water cutting it up almost to a liquid then placed it in a water bottle and shook it up

1/4 of the bottle air space
1/4 foam
1/4 plant material and a
1/4 water

much better soap product that does remove oils (tried it on my hair) works great :) I have sensitive skin and most soaps leave my skin dry and itchy this doesnt
I tried eating this plant raw and it is good just don't eat too much raw ;)

#40 wildedibles

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 05:50 AM

Silene

Silene latifolia (formerly Melandrium album), or White Campion, or
Silene dichotoma Ehrh.
forked catchfly
http://plants.usda.g...ID=sidi2_1v.jpg

reading more on this family is really interesting :)

These are the 2 I find here but there is a garden soap plant that is similar in some ways as these 2 r and different in a few ways as well common name is bouncing bet Saponaria a common garden plant here and can be used as a soap substitute

some herbal books I have read that this plant family Saponaria contains more saponin toxins and should not be used internally

I will clarify when I am done reading on these plants and saponin toxins and list some references I am being lazy here and I am sorry but have to clarify that they should not be eaten in large quantity's

but these types of food are everywhere in small quantity's Licorice, ginseng, .........
IMG_0821.JPG
this one is more hairy and may contain more soap .... may not be good to eat?
IMG_0815.JPG
IMG_0817.JPG


Silene vulgaris, or bladder campion
http://en.wikipedia....Silene_vulgaris
IMG_0811.JPG
This one is listed as edible when cooked :) cause it cooks the soap out
I have tried a few leaves here and there a bite raw they are ok but keep the amount small u might want to puke if u eat too much raw ;)
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Edited by wildedibles, 11 July 2013 - 06:40 AM.





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