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temp wanted in fruiting chamber???? [merged]


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#1 mycolord

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 07:32 PM

Am i correct or am i losing it? a drop in temp can help trigger pinning right? like from 80-74.

and mushies like to fruit around 74 degrees, and colonize around 82ish?

am i so out of practice that im forgeting the basics?

i was in chat talking about this and i really am still not sure. lol
damn im rusty

#2 waylitjim

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 09:38 PM

Am i correct or am i losing it? a drop in temp can help trigger pinning right? like from 80-74. and mushies like to fruit around 74 degrees, and colonize around 82ish?


Hey Myco...you still got it bro :)
Post casing / pre pinning you want the substrate temp
to be around 82-86 degrees...
And yes, a drop in air temperature (at the right time)
to 74-78 degrees will initiate primordia formation.

#3 mycolord

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 09:41 PM

:) cool
i knew i wasnt going crazy
and you keep the temp at that same 74-78 during the fruiting process also if im not mistaken. cool

#4 Guest_Peter Cottontail_*

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 10:08 PM

I'm not so sure the drop in temperature has anything to do with it. I incubate on an open shelf and fruit in an enclosure right next to it. If anything, with the lights on, the fruiting environment is warmer than my incubation environment. They fruit right on schedule four days to a week after the casing layer is applied. I think it has more to do with the level of air exchange and humidity than temperature.
RR

#5 myceliod

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 03:00 AM

me too..

#6 Guest_golly_*

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 05:08 AM

In their natural environment, it's the summer rains that seem to be the primary trigger for fruiting which is almost always accompanied with the temp dropping from the 80s/90s to the mid/low 70s ..It may be just lnsidental but proly not a bad idea to copy nature's method...

#7 python

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 08:17 AM

i think the change from 80-74 is minimal and will not initiate pinning.......however, it is the introduction of light that stimulates primordia formation...................

however 74 is a good fruiting temp.....

#8 Guest_freakachino_*

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 11:49 AM

lately I have been letting my casings chamber tent get up to about 80, then it cools to about 70 at night. Things have been pinning on avg. of 7-10 days. Of course I wish I could be like RR and have it on day 4 to the week! :)

#9 nomoreusmc

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 09:30 PM

I think the cold shock thing is bogus

#10 Hippie3

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 09:42 PM

i've had cakes fruit [pin] in 90*F+ weather

I'm not so sure the drop in temperature has anything to do with it.


agreed.
the reason to drop the temp
is to slow contams
not to initiate pinning.

#11 chill

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 09:28 PM

I'm with Rodger and Hip on this.

I have been exposing to light, humidity and O2 more early than not and have pinning consistently withen 3-5 days.

#12 hydrodad

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 11:45 PM

Just some things I have noticed recently... 1) With the higher temps in my closet as the weather warms; pinning is slow and few at 80-82 degrees (internal box temp).
2) I use an ultrasonic that runs 4 times a day for an hour each cycle. But... if I mist the inside walls of the box when I first put cakes in, the pins come sooner.
3) If box temps are in the mid 70's (no higher than 77) pinning is more abundant than if temps are close to 80 or above.
4) I can go down into the low 70's and pinning is good and fruits are good also, but fruits are better/bigger/fatter in the upper 70's

But still just expierementing at this...

#13 Guest_Peter Cottontail_*

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Posted 20 May 2005 - 07:32 AM

Here's a tip for a faster pinset. When your grains or compost/manure, etc is fully colonized, remove the foil or other cover and allow it to be exposed to light for a few hours , then apply the casing layer. The sudden drop in CO2 levels, air flow directly on the mycelia, and light directly on the mycelia, will cause it to change gears into fruiting mode. Don't mist during this time. Doing it this way, the myc will rarely colonize the casing layer completely, so overlay isn't going to be a problem, even with strains prone to overlay such as PR.
RR

#14 Guest_freakachino_*

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Posted 20 May 2005 - 10:06 AM

:) RR thanks, I never thought of it that way. I will try this for sure in a few days. That makes a lot of sense!

#15 buggyboy

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Posted 06 June 2005 - 10:54 PM

what about below 70, when does that start to damage the myc in say a cubensis or species with similar growth parameters. I have heard they grow wild where I live but have yet to see them. I know its not supposed to be until fall or so, but when I go hunting I want to make sure I go at the right time, it gets cold outdoors quick here in the fall.

#16 cthulhu

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Posted 11 June 2005 - 06:59 AM

By complete accident I did a bit of a controled experiment. I made 6, 8"

trays of crumbled pf cakes cased with a pasturized 50/50+ mix. I placed them

all in an incubator kept at 83deg for about 6 days then moved them to the

fruiting chambers after suitable recovery. The chambers are 14gal rubbermaid

roughneck tubs with a tube through the side hooked to an air pump that runs

24/7(I often cannot fan them for 12hrs or more). In the bottom I put a

mixture of water and h2o2. I managed them by fanning atleast twice a day

and misting whenever the sides and top looked dry. Each tray was prepared

and treated the same way except for the temp each tub was kept at. Tub 1

was kept around 65 to 68deg. Tub 2 was around 70 to 75deg. Tub 3 was

kept at about 80deg. I am in the process of fixing this problem as we speak. I

found it pretty interesting that small temp diferences can make such a

noticable change in growth rates. Each bin prodeced roughly the same yeild

but spaced out by about 1.5 days with the warmer being the fastest. Let me

know what you all think. Thanks.

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#17 max

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Posted 11 June 2005 - 08:34 AM

Can't really draw any conclusions based on just one test but consensus is, they do slow down when cooler. And contams speed up when hotter. Room temp, in the 70's seems to work well.

#18 Hippie3

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Posted 11 June 2005 - 08:52 AM

small temp diferences can make such a

noticable change in growth rates. Each bin prodeced roughly the same yeild

but spaced out by about 1.5 days with the warmer being the fastest



very true

#19 cthulhu

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Posted 11 June 2005 - 09:14 AM

here is what I got off the first flush of 6 trays. Not to bad for my first attempt in over a year :cool: . Now off to the archives to figure out how to dunk these trays for another flush :)

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#20 Guest_golly_*

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Posted 11 June 2005 - 09:33 AM

Interesting - Could u maintain those temps to see which survives the longest...?




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