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Beekeepers and bee watchers come fourth!


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#21 BillyThKid

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 09:54 PM

One of my posts above lists how to set up swarm traps in your area to try and catch some bees attention with lemon grass oil put into swarm traps. It should be close to the top.

Ahh I collect a bit of wax and honey every year. One of my friends told me about using the clean wax to hand roll natural candles for spiritual use. Turns out that if I cold produce enough wax it would be worth while on the price because people pay out the butt for all natural things especially when it has to do with ritualistic things. Though it was more so that not many places sell all natural wax that is why I want to do it, I have a tek for setting up hives to produce wax for candles however they are dependent hives and require honey to be added to them because that is what is used to make the wax.

When(if) I bust into my hives for harvest this year I will try and remember to take pictures, I hope to upload some soon as a have a device that can upload photos here. Working on a first gen iPad here lol.

Oh about the marry gold flowers, personally I no longer like having them around. Almost all of them are GMO now and unless you know for a fact it is not then its just poison to bees. If I am not mistaken colony collapse disorder is being linked to the bees working GMO plants that are suppose to naturally keep insects away, however the bees still work these plants and bring back poisoned pollen and nectar which slowly poisons the whole hive. I know it is impossible to avoid all GMO products and other people will still have plants that are GMO, but I try and keep that poison as far from my home as possible.

Besides MG flowers are only good for pollen, not much else in them for the bees and trust me they always have enough pollen.

I used to have a chart that showed what flowers bees can work that give the most nectar. Any fruit baring tree is welcome to bees. The die for that shit.

Also depending on what general area you live bees will for a 5 mile ratios around their hive and it is good to know what's growing in that area.

#22 Skywatcher

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 11:28 PM

This may seem like a foolish question to you, but do you have an annual cost you expect to maintain a hive? Obviously there are benifits and i am addicted to honey.

#23 Il19z8rn4li1

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 01:01 AM

This may seem like a foolish question to you, but do you have an annual cost you expect to maintain a hive? Obviously there are benifits and i am addicted to honey.


i have a bee keeping buddy and he says after the bees are established its only up front cost.

then one they are solid, they pretty much tend to themselves and its rather low maintenance.


from what i have read and what my friend says, they are just like anything else. YOu just
gotta give them attention and they are going to return the love :)


#24 BillyThKid

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 07:25 AM

This may seem like a foolish question to you, but do you have an annual cost you expect to maintain a hive? Obviously there are benifits and i am addicted to honey.


It really depends a lot on how many hives you want at once. The most costly thing is the hives, frames, and misc items you need like bee suits.

A decent bee suit that only covers from the waist up will run from 70-100 dollars for the ok ones. If you just go for the hood and gloves it is cheaper, but it's just asking to get stung being a noob in the field. Been doing it for a while now and I still always fully suit up.

For everything you need to start a year up with three hives expect to spend no less then five hundred dollars. And that is cutting it low on cost. The annual cost can be as little as 100 dollars or even nothing. You just need to supplies and a healthy set of hives.

i know we spent close to a thousand dollars when we first stared with two hives, but that was for two people being suited up and working.

#25 sarmasio

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 06:29 AM

Hey Billy,

Thank you for starting this thread, I love bees,
started to keep bees couple of years ago at my
friend's backyard, enjoyed it very much, worked
with them vearing a bee veil only, and most of the
time without any bee suit and veil. Working with
bees made me forget all my problems, and bekame happy
for a while. Bee venom is good against arthritis, depression.
Honey will cure any problem of the stomach, one teespon morning, one evening before sleep.
I can recomend beekeeping to anybody who owns a house an has its own backyard.



#26 sarmasio

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 11:39 PM

Billy,

 

how your bees are doing now? did all your hives survive the winter?



#27 sarmasio

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 05:11 AM

Billy,

 

I hope you are doing well, my friend is telling me there are a lot of dead bees

in front of my hive, this weekend I may need to inspect them. Hope there is a queen,

otherways I'm loosing them.



#28 sarmasio

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 03:23 AM

Still waiting with the inspection, the weather is still cold.



#29 BillyThKid

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 07:21 PM

I believe all my hives are dead. not from winter, but from GMO plants that are near my hives on a farm land i do not own. These plants are ful of nicotine and other pesticides harmful to a hive. this is the short story



#30 1967FordTitus

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 07:32 PM

Damn, that is a loss, sorry Kid.

#31 Skywatcher

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 11:23 PM

Extremely disturbing Billy. I just tonight also read the Monarch Butterfly has been further negatively impacted by feeding on GMC. I am sorry to hear this.

 

Not much comfort to you, but as a result of the inspiration from your original thread, I have successfully been able to convince my neighbors on all sides to leave the wild hive in the corner of my yard alone. The bees are in a location that makes wax or honey unharvestable, (in a block wall)  but I am glad to see them still thriving after a year now. They cause no problems and i have planted additional food sources in the yard.


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#32 1967FordTitus

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 11:41 PM

I am working on constructing a permaculture design of my property, want to incorporate hives into this. Being in the suburbs, there are no farms, factories or any of that. My worry is all the neighbors chemical fertilizers, and pesticides, affecting the insects, in this case bees. And all the wi-fi, and cell activity affecting the critters.

#33 Juthro

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 11:54 PM

I’m sorry to hear the news Billy, I could tell by the way you wrote about your hobbie you are passionate, and care about your bees.

 

 I’m sorry for your loss.

 

Peace and friendship,

Juth



#34 Spooner

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 08:44 PM

A few random notes from another beekeeper.

1) Cold does not kill bees if they have adequate honey, they form a cluster ball. Each bee eats her fill and rotates to the outside of the cluster, as they get hungry they move back to the center to refill. Their activity and body temperture keeps the center of the cluster at approximately 80-90 degrees F regardless of outside temperature, and the queen stays safe and warm in the center of the ball.

2) Hexagon hives look pretty from the outside but this is irrelevant to the bees. Bees will make good use of any protected enclosure. Primary considerations for the bees are protection from wind and rain, also a small entrance is easier for them to protect from robber bees and other preditors.

3) Medium Langstroth supers max out at about 60 pounds rather than 90+ for a maximum full Langstroth hive body. Mediums can be used for both main hive bodies and supers to good advantage. Interchangable parts makes them ideal for inspecting the hives to protect from disease and promote stronger and healthier bees.

4) Raw Honey is nectar concentrated down to about 17% water content where it will not spoil. This makes it good on wounds. The Honey is antiseptic and moist, put it directly on the cleaned wound or burn, then cover with a clean top dressing. It promotes healing with reduced scaring and fights infecion.

5) Local raw honey helps your body immunize itself against allergys from local irritants.

6) Pollination by bees is vital to many crops both fruit and vegetable. In one test, cucumber yield was increased 400% by simply introducing more bees to the field. Crops such as apples are so dependant on bees, that in areas of China where pesticides wiped out all the bees, they have to hand pollinate each flower to get any fruit at all.

7) I keep two hives by my front door which reduces agrivation by police, thieves and unwanted guests.

8) A Beekeeper is really just a landlord. In exchange for a disease free and protected place to live, the bees are able to concentrate solely on what they do best, store nectar and pollen. The resulting excess is your pay for protecting them.

9) It takes about 4 pounds of honey to make a pound of wax, so it is good to feed a new swarm with sugar water and a little Honey-B-Healthy (a natural lemongrass/spearmint stimulant) so they can draw out new comb without having to waste nectar getting their house in order and comb drawn out.

10) Do NOT use commercial honey to feed bees. It may carry bee diseases and most probablly has residual chemicals in it used by commercial beekeepers to disinfect hives.

I personallyy do not like honey but I love my bees, they work hard and are a delight to watch, The excess honey makes great Mead (a yummy healthful drink). Or the honey can be sold, swaped, or given away. There always seems to be more demand than supply.
With the current monoculture and increased use of pesticides there are not enough natural swams, so keep a few hives to improve your neighbohood and help any gardens within a radius of two miles from you. Enjoy!

Edited by Spooner, 31 January 2014 - 12:02 AM.

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#35 Spooner

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 09:10 PM

There many ways to cut down on initial costs, but annual costs are minimal. Go to the sports section of wally world and get a cheap $5 mosquito hood for your head. It is adequate protection for your head. I have full bee suits with gloves but seldom use anything except a hat to keep them from getting tangled in my hair. When they are working hard they tend to prefer collecting nectar to stinging. Be gentle when working with them, they are better at aggression than you will ever be.

Once you have a couple hives overwintered, you know that the genetics are good for your area and conditions. I would recommend starting with at least two hives. That way you can compare and use a stronger hive to support the weaker if necessary.
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#36 Spooner

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 11:08 PM

Now is the perfect time to start working on new beehives. There is lots to assemble and paint or varnish in preparation for spring installation of live bees. If you will be ordering your live bees for April delivery, get your order in now because it will be hard to find live bees in the spring. I like the mild tempered 3 band Italians but any commercially available strain is ok. After a couple years your bees will cross breed with whatever is in your area anyway. If you are lucky enough to have a local breeder ask them what is good in your area and what they will have available in spring, But I have successfully used packaged bees from the southern breeders in Vermont with no trouble.

Recommend purchasing knocked down but standardized Langstroth hive frames and boxes to start. I use 10 frame all Mediums (or Illinois supers) for both brood and supers now because they are lighter to lift. Buying knocked down reduces shipping and all you need is a hammer and glue to assemble. There is a lot of work in making all the cuts, and for less than 20 hives the setup time is not worth the small savings over good quality wood anyway.

Question for Billy: Have you tried any of the plastic frames? I have not and see no reason to switch from wood, though I do use plastic now for tops and bottoms where rot often starts and which is not near the honey. Would love to hear your opinion on plastic frames.
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#37 BillyThKid

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 12:31 PM

There many ways to cut down on initial costs, but annual costs are minimal. Go to the sports section of wally world and get a cheap $5 mosquito hood for your head. It is adequate protection for your head. I have full bee suits with gloves but seldom use anything except a hat to keep them from getting tangled in my hair. When they are working hard they tend to prefer collecting nectar to stinging. Be gentle when working with them, they are better at aggression than you will ever be.

Once you have a couple hives overwintered, you know that the genetics are good for your area and conditions. I would recommend starting with at least two hives. That way you can compare and use a stronger hive to support the weaker if necessary.

Great post dude, read your longer one too and i agree with it all. I would like to add that If anyone wants to call themselves a true environmentalist or "green" person that they would need to be a landlord to some bee hives. Bees are the #1 thing you can do to help save the earth, your local environment, and the global environment.

 

Sugar water was a pain for the first year for my bees but i know good and well they need it to help keep the hive from wasting so much honey on the wax. Thankfully after the first year i no longer had to feed them sugar water. I did eventually start using a Chicken water dispenser that was 4 gallons, i added sugar water to it when the bees had nothing in flow at the moment for them to pollinate.  i put it far enough away from all the hives that they would not be able to fight over it.

 

I’m sorry to hear the news Billy, I could tell by the way you wrote about your hobbie you are passionate, and care about your bees.

 

 I’m sorry for your loss.

 

Peace and friendship,

Juth

When one door closes another one opens. I have had a good long run with working with bees and I know i will have them again soon. Your friendship and concern are most welcome and i thank you.

 

I am working on constructing a permaculture design of my property, want to incorporate hives into this. Being in the suburbs, there are no farms, factories or any of that. My worry is all the neighbors chemical fertilizers, and pesticides, affecting the insects, in this case bees. And all the wi-fi, and cell activity affecting the critters.

Horticultural science with a focus in medicinal plants is my specialty. got a new business going where i am designing home and gardens around medicinal plants and making it look good. Most of the houses around here have very small gardens to none at all. i hope to change that.

As for permaclture i have studied it a bit. Not much though. 

 

So far as i am aware cell phone and wi-fi do not affect bees. the main problem is GMO crops and pesticides along with a slow decline in plant species of which they feed from. more and more houses are growing gardens of flowers bees cannot use.

 

Extremely disturbing Billy. I just tonight also read the Monarch Butterfly has been further negatively impacted by feeding on GMC. I am sorry to hear this.

 

Not much comfort to you, but as a result of the inspiration from your original thread, I have successfully been able to convince my neighbors on all sides to leave the wild hive in the corner of my yard alone. The bees are in a location that makes wax or honey unharvestable, (in a block wall)  but I am glad to see them still thriving after a year now. They cause no problems and i have planted additional food sources in the yard.

Yes, Monarchs are especially hurting right now. I use to see dozens every year, last year i saw one and only one. I believe the main cause is the nicotine genes they have been splicing into many crops as a "natural" pesticide. it is quite harmful to most insects including butterflies and bees.

 

I am happy to see that you have the bee hive left alone. If it has formed a natural hive that is very rare. If you want you could try and capture a swarm from the hive. This can be done by using a swarm trap near the current hive with lemon grass oil extract put inside of it.

When the bees run out of room in their old hive they will swarm and try and find a new one. they will find your swarm trap and hopfully go into it. once they are inside you can move them into an actual hive body, and there you go you have your own hive.

 

What plants did you plant as extra food? if you really wish to go to the extram you could redo your yard with patches of clover, bees love clover.


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#38 BillyThKid

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 12:45 PM

 

did not mean to reply to this oops. cant figure out how to delete a post.


Edited by BillyThKid, 31 January 2014 - 12:46 PM.


#39 krookie

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 01:17 PM

last year i begin the process but was shot down. my home is too close to others for it to happen here in nj, will have to wait until i move :(



#40 krookie

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 01:22 PM

planting clover after winter! legally i cant own them butttt i could attract them to my yard :)






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