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Weraroa Pouch Fungi


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#1 waylitjim

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 10:38 PM

Species - Weraroa novaezelandiae
Family - Strophariaceae (same Family as the genus Psilocybe)
Genus - Weraroa

Is the Weraroa Pouch Fungi active?
Yes, the pouch fungi contains active alkaloids and is non-toxic. No one knows for sure what the chemical make up is, more research needs to be done on this species. Like other active fungi, Weraroa novaezelandiae demonstrate a strong bluing reaction when cut or bruised.

Where can they be found?
Weraroa novaezelandiae have only been found in New Zealand. Generally found South of Wanganui in the North Island. They are also found in the south island, but I'm not sure of their distribution. Weraroa cucullata are found in swampy areas of California, tho it's not active.

Where did it come from?
The Weraroa genus is suspected of being derived from the Psilocybe genus. Many consider it to be the ancient ancestor to the Strophariaceae family. Like the rest of the family, it's a saprobic fungi. Saprobes derive their nutrition from nonliving organic material.

Do they drop spores?
Because they are pouch fungi, they dont drop spores as the gills remain enclosed in the body. They rely on insects to spread spores.

What's the trip like?
The trip comes on very quickly compared to other varieties. A sense of weirdness appears followed by slight giddiness and strange waves across the body. These shrooms tend to sink you into really weird thinking patterns. The trip is not very visual for most unless a larger dose is ingested. At higher doses, visual distortions are evident and walking can be very difficult. This mushroom can be really bizarre and intense, definately for the more experienced tripper and not for the faint at heart.

Here's some pics from Inski: (click to enlarge)





And a few macros: spores and cheilocystidia


Wet vs Dry

Some pics from Zeewarp (Weraroa virescens)




Info an pics collected from Inski, Zeewarp, ShroomieDole, Gumby and FeralPsyStomper

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#2 scotia

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 11:11 PM

:kewl:

Because they're only found in a certain parts of NZ, would be impossible to cultivate em at home if you had the spores, jim? They look nice...

#3 waylitjim

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 12:22 AM

As far as I know, there haven't been any cultivation attempts. It's only a matter of time before someone like Workman has a go at this species. I'm guessing cultivation would be similar to that of Psilocybe semilanceata, a challenge but not impossible. Both share similar habitat preferences. P. semilanceata usually fruits from decaying grass remains. While the Weraroa Pouch Fungi has been found fruiting on rotted cabbage tree, it's often associated with decaying fern fronds. The caps of P. semilanceata do share a slight resemblance to the Pouch Fungi.
765055505-psilocybe-semilanceata6.jpg
Psilocybe semilanceata

#4 beardedlady

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 12:37 AM

How peculiar. It looks like a little fruit, I bet it's delicious. I wish I could try these. Thanks for the info!

#5 Guest_freakachino_*

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 12:44 AM

Thats why I :heartbeat Mycotopia!

I learn something everyday!

Waylit, thanks for not only the pictures, but the good info on this species.

#6 waylitjim

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 12:45 AM

How peculiar. It looks like a little fruit, I bet it's delicious.


Yummy!

http://mycotopia.net...20&d=1151724901

#7 beardedlady

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 01:11 AM

Well, maybe it doesn't look so appetizing in those pictures. Those look like little dead grubs or something. Lion King!

#8 scotia

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 07:38 AM

As far as I know, there haven't been any cultivation attempts. It's only a matter of time before someone like Workman has a go at this species. I'm guessing cultivation would be similar to that of Psilocybe semilanceata, a challenge but not impossible. Both share similar habitat preferences. P. semilanceata usually fruits from decaying grass remains. While the Weraroa Pouch Fungi has been found fruiting on rotted cabbage tree, it's often associated with decaying fern fronds. The caps of P. semilanceata do share a slight resemblance to the Pouch Fungi.
765055505-psilocybe-semilanceata6.jpg
Psilocybe semilanceata



they look like sweet , and/or lotus bulbs!
As, I presume, they like to grow on rotting vegetation, do you think they could germinate on some kind of (not contam. but) rotting (the right kind, based on trial and error) variation of cake?

I can see some kind of rotting sub. tek evolving here.

#9 golly

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 10:01 AM

That's a strange one Jim ...It makes me wonder if the perfect hallucinogenic fungus has yet to be identified....Great post man...

#10 SquaresandCubes

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 01:25 PM

Does anyone know how many hallucenogenic mushrooms are out there?
Before I found this place I just knew of cubies and amanitas.

#11 alpiner

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 05:34 PM

Send out some spore samples to a few of the folks around here that seem to be able to make magic happen like Rodger and workman.
hah, that would be cool if someone got some samples and could grow the buggers
has no one ever done any chemical analisis on these?
it seems most species that have active compounds have been tested by the pharmacorparations or by universities

#12 waylitjim

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 05:43 PM

I'm sure Workman already has a sample of Weraroa novaezelandiae. Sporeworks donates a percentage of their profits to the research and development of new species. It's only a matter of time.

#13 Bobcat

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 05:44 PM

yeah, I bet they would be extremely popular and a valuable asset to whoever offers them if it ever happens.

#14 waylitjim

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 08:14 PM

Does anyone know how many psychoactive mushrooms are out there?


There's no exact numbers because new mushrooms are always discoverd. But the common ones are Amanita muscaria, which contain the psychoactive chemicals ibotenic acid and muscimol. Then there's the genera Panaeolus consisiting of Panaeolus cyanescens, cambodginiensis, tropicalis and subbalteatus. You have the genus Gymnopilus which consists of a few mildly active species like Gymnopilus spectabilis and Gymnopilus purpuratus. Last but not least the geus Psilocybe. This genus goes far and wide, worldwide there's close to 100 different species in the Psilocybe genus, and the list is still growing.

As Paul Stamets once said, "Psilocybes have propelled themselves to the front lines of the evolutionary race precisely because of their psilocybin content. The production of psilocybin has proven to be a competitive evolutionary advantage. Psilocybin mushrooms carry with them a message from nature about the health of the planet. At a time of planetary crisis brought on by human abuse, the earth calls out thru these mushrooms-sacraments that lead directly to a deeper ecological consciousness, and motivate people to take action."

#15 waylitjim

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 08:37 PM

A few more pics of Weraroa novaezelandiae from Montmont



A nice collection from Stimulus
731095338-pouch_set_005_cropd.jpg

They seem to be a relatively rare species. One should think of conservation, esp considering they actually need to drop to the ground and rot to distribute spores. They don't grow in large patches.. tend to be metres apart and only 1 - 3 growing in each spot. Also in the same forest, they were easiest to find within a 400m radius, and practically none found beyond that. Found growing on rotting wood and are usually half buried under rotting leaves.

The pouch has a rubbery consistency and feels quite strong when cutting through it. the insides have brown gill-like structures and a stalk running through the middle up to the top of the pouch.

And a habitat pic from The Hidden Forest
http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1151806390

pics and text from Stimulus, Montmont and The Hidden Forest

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#16 SharkieJones

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 08:54 PM

Looks kind of like a rotten egg in the center. I'd like to try this weirdness for myself one day. Thanks for the pics.

#17 python

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 12:33 AM

great pics waylit..................totally interesting stuff...........

#18 Workman

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 01:23 PM

I'm sure Workman already has a sample of Weraroa novaezelandiae. Sporeworks donates a percentage of their profits to the research and development of new species. It's only a matter of time.



Hehe, right you are. I've been working on this species for awhile and so far things look very promising. The mycelium is very aggressive and I expect an outdoor patch in the PNW to produce something this Fall.

The mycelium also stains blues as it ages which is also a good sign. I still have to work out a method of spore distribution, if I am successful, since they don't produce sporeprints.

#19 SWIM

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 11:09 PM

I still have to work out a method of spore distribution, if I am successful, since they don't produce sporeprints.


How about injecting distilled water into the pouch and then sucking it back into the syringe?

#20 waylitjim

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 11:37 PM

Hehe, right you are. I've been working on this species for awhile and so far things look very promising. The mycelium is very aggressive and I expect an outdoor patch in the PNW to produce something this Fall.


Workman, what are your thoughts about a fruiting substrate for Weraroa novaezelandiae? They seem to share some similarities with P. semilanceata. Hopefully they're not mycorrhizal fungi. ;)

I still have to work out a method of spore distribution since they don't produce sporeprints.


Slicing the pouch in half before printing might be a possiblity?
montmont4.jpg




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