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Weraroa Pouch Fungi


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#21 waylitjim

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 11:44 PM

Like the rest of the family, it's a saprobic fungi.


Fungus, unlike plants and animals—obtain food by absorbing nutrients from an external source. Fungi lack chlorophyll, the green pigment that enables plants to make their own food. Consequently, fungi cannot synthesize their own food the way plants do. In order to feed, fungi release digestive enzymes that break down food outside their bodies. The fungus then absorbs the dissolved food through its cell walls. Since they depend on outside sources for food, fungi have developed various living arrangements that enhance their opportunities for food absorption.

Most fungi are saprobes. A saprobe is an organism that derives its nutrition from the dead remains of other organisms; a scavenger, if you will. Saprobic fungi usually live on dead vegetable matter (sticks, leaves, logs etc), as they are the only multi-celled organisms that can digest the structural proteins cellulose and lignin, the two major components of wood. Most yard and garden mushrooms are saprobes, as well as dung-loving mushrooms and mushrooms that decompose leaf or needle litter.

#22 BuckarooBanzai

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 01:52 AM

Fantastic thread, man. Great info.

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#23 Workman

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 10:21 AM

Workman, what are your thoughts about a fruiting substrate for Weraroa novaezelandiae? They seem to share some similarities with P. semilanceata. Hopefully they're not mycorrhizal fungi. ;)
Slicing the pouch in half before printing might be a possiblity?


It is extremely unlikley it is mycorrhizal and the mycelium is much more aggressive than semilanceata. It produces a strandy mycelium that is similar to some of the woodlovers and it prefers a woody substrate. Like Psilocybe azurescens, this species may be a reluctant fruiter indoors but it also may thrive in outdoor beds.

I won't know what method to use to get the spores out until I have some fresh specimens to work with. Syringes probably won't be a problem, but prints are going to require some experiments.

The first post in this thread is excellent. A concise collection of pretty much everything known so far about this species. Good work Waylitjim!

#24 srgtm1a

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 11:30 AM

Very interesting thread.....If I found something like that, I would think it was some kind of weird fruit. One of the most interesting fungi I have ever seen. This is up there on my list of wicked looking fungus. My favorite prior to this was Dictyophora Indusiata.

Thanx for sharing this waylitjim! Excellent pics and very informative.

#25 Workman

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Posted 17 October 2006 - 04:20 PM

I was going to add something to this post but now its in the vault
http://mycotopia.net...ghlight=weraroa
I'll add some images and more detail here in the next few days. I didn't expect the site to be up today.

I have been successful in cultivating the NZ pouch fungus outdoors in the PNW.

Hallucinogenic New Zealand Weraroa species (possibly Weraroa novaezelandiae) on woodchips and douglas fir cones. Relatively easy to grow outdoors using the same outdoor methods used for Psilocybe azurescens and P. cyanescens. The mycelium is very aggressive and stains blue with age or damage.

Isolation from material provided by Reverend Jim Jones. Collected in Wilton's Bush Botanical Gardens near Wellington, New Zealand.

The fruits are very strange, something you can't appreciate until you have one in hand. The outside is like cartilage and somewhat difficult to cut.
The cut flesh blues slowly but nicely.
I am currently drying a split specimen slowly to allow as many spores as possible to mature. I then plan to gently crush the dry specimen and wash and strain out the spore water which will then be centrifuged -washed - centrifuged again. Then spore samples can be placed on foil to dry, tested for germination and then distribution (I hope).
(some of zeewerp's pictures in the previous post are actually of Weraroa virescens, an inactive species)

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  • Weraroa text.jpg

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#26 dial8

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Posted 17 October 2006 - 04:24 PM

Very nice workman! Can you give us some information on how you got to the point in the picture. How did you germinate the spores you were working with initially, what did you use as the fruiting sub, temps, etc. Were you working with a spore print or did you use dry tissue?

#27 waylitjim

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Posted 17 October 2006 - 04:52 PM

Yeah, no problem Workman...post in this thread then we'll merge the two.

Btw, thanks for the heads up on Zeewarps Weraroa virescens. I'll edit that.

#28 Workman

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Posted 17 October 2006 - 07:36 PM

thanks for the heads up on Zeewarps Weraroa virescens


No problem, I noticed it when I was reviewing all of the information regarding this species. He even mentions that he may have had a mixed collection and some of his specimens didn't stain blue. The elongated shape of the W. virescens is also somewhat distinctive.

Spores were extracted from a dried specimen and started on agar. I experimented with grass seed and several mixtures of horse manure, partially decayed fir cones and alder chips. Success was on partially decayed douglas fir cones with some wood chips and a small amount of manure (which is probably not neccessary). The first of 3 fruits (so far), developed directly on the cones. Fruiting temperatures were low 60's to mid 50's.

Judging by the aggressive nature of the mycelium, I am hopeful that pending indoor experiments will be successful. It at least seems easier to induce fruiting than Psilocybe azurescens and P. cyanescens.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Weraroa (2) copy.jpg
  • Weraroa (11) copy.jpg


#29 Bobcat

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Posted 17 October 2006 - 08:27 PM

That's the cats ass Workman! Its so exciting to not only see something new but totally different as well! Good luck on your indoor endeavors!

So are you thinking conifer material, if not cones themselves, are beneficial to the extent of necessity? I realize it is still early in your trials, of course.

Oh, and :bow: :amazed: :bow:

#30 Workman

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Posted 17 October 2006 - 11:20 PM

I don't think the cones are necessary. I do think the spongy nature of the partially decayed (sterilized) cones provides a moisture reservoir that supports fruitings in less than ideal conditions.

#31 Lazlo

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Posted 17 October 2006 - 11:51 PM

http://mycotopia.net...95&d=1161131306

Now that's an excellent, alien like photograph if I say so myself. Great work.

#32 Workman

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 12:00 AM

Hehe, kinda like an alien autopsy. The skull-like outer rind with brain-like folds inside, gross.

#33 waylitjim

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 12:33 AM

Wow, nice photos Workman!
Indoor pouch fungi would be really far out!

Here's another pic to add to the thread.
Not sure who the credit goes to, but these are wild harvested.

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  • werrora.jpg


#34 bluehelix

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 12:48 AM

Bizarre! I wonder if these are potent.

#35 Workman

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 07:26 PM

From what I have read, it seems to be similar to other temperate woodlovers, which means its fairly potent on average. I am hoping to send some specimens in for alkaloid measurements to confirm.

#36 Bobcat

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 07:56 PM

What's the trip like?

The trip comes on very quickly compared to other varieties. A sense of weirdness appears followed by slight giddiness and strange waves across the body. These shrooms tend to sink you into really weird thinking patterns. The trip is not very visual for most unless a larger dose is ingested. At higher doses, visual distortions are evident and walking can be very difficult. This mushroom can be really bizarre and intense, definately for the more experienced tripper and not for the faint at heart.

http://mycotopia.net...ghlight=weraroa



#37 bluehelix

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 08:57 PM

At any rate they look like a trip for sure. I would be scared of such a thing had I found it outside. It's hard to believe the spores are properly dispersed considering they shape.

#38 SharkieJones

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 09:38 PM

This is a very interesting thread Workman I will be waiting for the results. Can't wait until the spores are available.

#39 Bobcat

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 09:41 PM

I believe the other thread also covers spore dispersal. The fungus falls to the ground and rots and the spores are dispersed by those willing to eat it and crawl through it.

#40 Workman

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 10:38 PM

Test image for Weraroa microscopy.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Weraroa watermarked_reduced.jpg





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