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Gluten free baking recipes


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#1 wildedibles

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 05:59 AM

I have went wheat free the last 2 months and feeling way better :)

brain fog gone

more energy

no more belly pain every day

no more puking every day

I had no clue I had an issue with wheat but trying wheat free diet I am amazed at the difference in me and will not eat wheat willingly or knowingly again

wheat is hiding in everything I did loose lots of weight and well I do not wanna loose anymore so I want to put together a thread on recipes yummy wheat free low sugar but I do want fats and some sugars the better choices out there anyway ;)

 

Buckwheat has become a fav for me right now it is close in constancy and will rise a bit with yeast or baking powder .... pancakes are way easier to make and cook with buckwheat now i know why they are a fav with some people :)

 

If anyone has any recipes to offer I would love to hear them and try them I would love to make noodles and I have read that I need a press my pasta roller will not work with wheat free noodles so I am hunting out one of these as soon as I can find one or make one lol

 

Buckwheat pancakes

 

1 cup buckwheat flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon sugar honey etc.. less or none if you want a bread wrap type crepe

1 egg

and enough milk to make them as thick as u want (let it sit while u warm up the pan sometimes i find this flour to absorb more liquid as it sits so add a bit more milk if it gets too thick )

 

you can add blueberries or anything u would normally add to pancakes

 

I add butter and oil to the pan for the 1st one then non after that it seems not to stick this way

pour a bit of batter into the pan, cover with a lid, flip when the top is almost cooked it will be nice and brown on the bottom

 

tip do not flip till the top is almost cooked or it could stick and make a mess if it isnt cooked enough lids work perfect to evenly cook pancakes :)

 

hope you enjoy muffin recipe coming next ;)


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#2 Ilia

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 07:44 AM

I've been gluten free for over 2 years now. Great health improvements - one of the best results was not sneezing in response to pollen. I also do not eat sugar(though I can have sugars like fructose in the form of fresh fruits) and stay away from all milk products. Makes cooking a bit difficult at first eating like this. But the longer I stay away from those foods the more my palette changes. Veggies have become so tasty and I have also discovered new recipes for myself to make all sorts of things - even cake abiding by my diet! I'll share some here too as time goes by. Onion and garlic go a long way to add flavour to meals :) . I lapsed in diet some times in past but have not done so in months now and do not foresee it happening again - it gets easier with time and foods I used to like are not even enticing with the changes in my taste...


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#3 wildedibles

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 12:47 PM

Thank you for adding :) yes I want to hear some recipes ... fingers crossed I made a bday cake milk free gluten free ...muffins I am getting better at but 1st cake I will share later oh maybe some pictures if I remember

 

I am working on sugar :) I find that I am less grouchy if I do not spike my sugar which leads to low sugar and sleeping in the middle of the day ;) I have cut my sugar by more than a half and wow didnt realize how much junk was sneaking into my healthy diet

 

I have been eating healthy foods for way too long but all this little bit of junk or binge junk food popped in more times than I was willing to admit ;) I wanna note to that I exercise lots I bike or walk where ever I go store, mail, work etc everywhere so I do not mind eating fats but want to balance a have a good balance of healthy fats

 

It is hard it is more expensive (but it can be cheaper too ;)

u have to be creative and my hopes is that we can share I would love to add vegan vegetarian alternatives in baking here too

trying to change the basic recipe to fit a personal diet can be challenging but I anticipate it will be a lot of fun :)



#4 wildedibles

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 12:45 AM

IMG_9285.JPG

 

Blueberry buckwheat muffins :)

 

1 1/2cup buckwheat flour

1 teaspoon baking powder (which i forgot this time oops)

1/4 cup sugar reduced from original recipe was 1 cup

(I used stevia this time 1 leaf crushed up and allowed to steep in the milk for 15mins)

 

1/2 c milk

1/2 c oil

2 eggs

 

add the fruit berries or seasonings as u wish ... If it is a little too thick add a bit more milk and oil I find buckwheat sucks up more liquid than reg flour but do not use less flour or u will not get enough batter to fill 12 muffin tins ;)

 

I added 1 cup frozen blueberries defrosted in the microwave for a minuet

 

I cook them at 350 for 15-20 mins a tooth pick inserted in the center of the muffin will come out clean or if u press on the top of the muffin its done when it bounces back if you finger leaves a dent its not quite done yet ;)


Edited by wildedibles, 10 November 2013 - 12:47 AM.


#5 TurkeyRanch

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 12:57 AM

My lady is a celiac, so we obviously cant have gluten.

We cooked a turkey the other night, and I made gluten free gravy.

In a jar I placed: 1/2 T potato flour, 1 T rice flour, 1 T corn starch

add water to jar, secure lid and shake till smooth.

Bring drippings to simmer in pan, whisk in flour water mix slowly and reduce till the gravy gets all wavy.
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#6 permafrying

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 01:06 AM

My lady is a celiac, so we obviously cant have gluten.

We cooked a turkey the other night, and I made gluten free gravy.

In a jar I placed: 1/2 T potato flour, 1 T rice flour, 1 T corn starch

add water to jar, secure lid and shake till smooth.

Bring drippings to simmer in pan, whisk in flour water mix slowly and reduce till the gravy gets all wavy.


That sounds really good. i Didn't know there was such think as potato flour.
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#7 wildedibles

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 01:08 AM

Thank you TurkeyRanch for adding that :)

 

I just learned too that the thing with thickening with starches is not to boil it too hard.  Heat will break down the thickness of it ...

This is why all my corn starch gravy turned out way too runny I cooked it on high

 

When I tried this time I cooked it on medium and it turned out nice and thick :)

 

Mmmmm gravy mmmm.... now I am hungry ;) have any left overs ;) yum yum



#8 Blueringer

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 12:39 PM

I have a good friend that owns a Gluten free bakery. Everything they cook is gluten free and you wouldn't even know it (except for the sign saying so :tongue: ). I could probably get a recipe or two if there was something specific you were interested in?


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#9 TurkeyRanch

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 01:01 PM

Ya, thickening anything is a challenge gluten free. I have found mixing potato and rice flour, maybe bean flour too, along with a bit of corn starch works for gravy, and cheese sauces, stuff like that. Also adding it slowly and keeping the heat low works. I have had a few cheese sauces and gravy type things end up a gloopy mess that seperates into oil and non-oil, with clots.

Seems we eat fairly normally, we just have to buy expensive noodles, and very small loaves of bread.

Anyone else notice that besides costing 6 bucks a loaf, almost ALL packaged gluten free bread is about half sized compaired to normal bread? :rant rant rant:
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#10 Blueringer

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 01:18 PM

why not agar, pectin or geletin for thickening? There is also xanthum gum or guar gum. There are a ton of choices to use as gluten free thickening agents.


Edited by Blueringer, 12 November 2013 - 01:18 PM.

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#11 wildedibles

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 03:31 AM

agar and pectin work perfect for cool jello type things I think gelatin is from pig bones? so it should be gluten free

 

I have noticed the bread is smaller too I havent tried it yet cause 6 bucks I will go without

 

I have made crepes instead just no sugar was added and they worked great for flat bread

I think the bread is small cause it is hard to get it to rise without gluten

 

I tried to make a bread and it didnt rise it was dense and very small over all using the same amount of flour I just used rice flour and sorgum flour

 

The xanthium gum and guar gum is soposed to help with making gluten free flour act more like gluten flour I really want to try it out

 

can you find a nice simple bread recipe would be great small loaf or not I would like to make my own bread :) I dont believe in charging people more money just cause they r sick but spending a little more money on flour that is over all better for us than the cheap stuff I have to look at it this way ;) and over all this way of eating is better food choices compared to the white flour and sugar "glue trap" ;)



#12 TurkeyRanch

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 10:51 PM

This is whats on the stove right now, gluten free.

Bacon lentil soup, for 4 people

1/2 pound bacon
2 large onions
Some garlic
Bunch celery
3 or 4 big carrots
2 cups lentils
8 cups Veggie stock or beef stock
Red pepper powder
Cumin
Salt/pepper

Grated parm cheese

Chop half pound of bacon, or more if your younger than 30, and fry till crispy. Set bacon aside. Put some bacon fat in pan, with butter or olive oil, and fry onions. When they are 3/4 cooked, add garlic, carrots, and celery. Fry for few min, then season with pepper, cumin, salt/pepper. Fry min longer, then add stock. Bring to boil, add lentils. Simmer for 35 to 40 min, add bacon 5 min before serving. Put generous amount of parm on top of each bowl and serve.

The cheese makes it or breaks it.
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#13 wildedibles

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 06:16 AM

Thanks :) sounds really yummy :)

 

I wanted to mention that it is the season to start baking and I have tried making some cookies they worked out really well no pictures yet but I will work on that I froze some cookies so they will be ready for the holidays :)

 

1st one is

 

Green short bread cookies :)

 

1st start making some pot butter I use my crock pot on warm for a few hours or over night I used one stick or 1/4 cup butter is what it worked out to be and a hand full of some green weeds ;)

 

1/4cup green butter

1egg

1/2 cup cornstarch

1/2 cup of mixed starch gluten free baking mix mine has potato starch, tapioca starch, corn starch and some other starches in there

1/2 cup of coconut flour

1/2 cup icing sugar

some vanilla (I made my own by soaking my vanilla beans in apple wine (yum yum)

I also added some almonds slivered and crushed

 

mix all this together and shape into little balls press with a fork so they r flat and bake at 350 for 10 mins check the bottom the top dosent brown but the bottom does ;)

 

 

This one worked sooo well I made peanut butter cookies too

 

1 cup peanut butter

1/2 cup icing sugar

1/2 cup mixed starch or corn starch

1 egg

 

mix and roll into balls flaten and cook for 10 mins at 350



#14 wildedibles

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 01:44 PM

MMMmmmm........ Chocolate :) I just made something like the inside to thoes yummy soft chocolates with green butter yumyum and coconut butter added in there the soft touch It hasnt fully set so it might get harder its like a mousse texture right now dark chocolate taste coconut milk :) just a bit of sugar but I could use stevia I have some a friend grew in the garden ... I had to use a bit of egg to get it all to emulsify ;)


Edited by wildedibles, 20 January 2014 - 01:45 PM.

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#15 Skywatcher

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 09:45 PM

OOOH, 

Those sound gooood. Dip them in a hard set chocolate and you have truffles. This keeps the inside fresh and sealed.......

Like those are going to last very long anyway.


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#16 wildedibles

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 06:55 AM

:) I still have some left in the frezor cant get them out of the mold I havent tried hot water tho it might melt them out of there I have been scooping them out and cutting them up into pancakes

I love the idea of dipping them in a hard chocolate but wanting to use coconut butter its hard to get them hard I can use butter that work better to make a hard chocolate ;)

 

I have been doing something with my left over rice that I wanted to share I eat this for breckfast cause it is sooo easy ;)

 

left over rice

some dried fruit raisins cranberries apricots anything u want ;)

I use rice milk or coconut milk or almond milk enough to add a bit more moisture than u think u need so the fruit can absorb some and the rice will absorb some too

a bit of brown sugar but i am trying to cut sugar so i use like a teaspoon full thats it u can not use it and it tastes ok too

some nuts any will do

and flax meal to add some extra fiber and suck up the milk

cinnamon pumpkin pie spice and vanilla :)

 

let this sit for a half an hour or cook it on low till the liquid is gone and eat :) yum yum

you can add a little good fat here too I usually add oil to my cooking water for the rice you could add your fav oil here to add a fat in there but u get protiens carbs goof fiber good fats full of nutrients :) lots of energy to burn :)

...no need to stop at the store for a quick yummy treat when u have something that is yummy less sugar and more nutrients that is way cheaper than u can get at the store it is just as quick when using left over rice :)

 

I like cooking this too I will maybe take pictures of this recipe making rice pudding from the start not using left over rice :)


Edited by wildedibles, 14 February 2014 - 07:00 AM.

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#17 wildedibles

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 07:15 AM

I finally made some yummy bread I didnt go by a recipe but I will be trying again and make note of how much of each I used I used 1 table spoon of yeast and I think I am going to try with a little less next time maybe half table spoon cause it tasted too much like yeast but it rose and it wasnt a brick :)

I used xanthium gum 1 table spoon and it made it nice and soft and helped it rise a bit  I am happy with the results and even happier that I do not have to spend $6 on a loaf of bread that is half the size of a reg loaf....????

I might be paying close to that tho but I can choose the grains and fibre and sugar and no milk alternatives now :) adjust fats I used coconut and olive oil for the fat and mixed a bunch of grains / starch

 

I used a mixed starch potato, corn, tapioca, sorgahm flower, buckwheat, bulgar hydrated, poppy seeds and flax meal a little brown sugar maybe a table spoon 1 egg and some herbals lemon balm, oragano, thyme .....

as I said I will take measurements better next time I adjusted the dough to be more of a batter as most of the breads u buy r more a batter not as thin as a cake batter but not a dough u pound out either I just mixed it all up like muffin batter or bannana bread pushed it into the bread tin and let rise a little cooked it at 300 cooler than usual for bread but this helped it rise in the oven and didnt cook it too hot and hard ;)



#18 wildedibles

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 02:02 AM

I have been reading more and more about my gluten allergy

I have learned that with gluten allergy you can become deficient in fat soluble vitamins ones that we absorb from our intestines ... with a gluten allergy the intestines become inflamed and sores or ulcers or inflammation of the intestines can interfere with the way you absorb vitamins and minerals in the intestines

I am going to go over some of these vitamins as I read more detailed information about them I am adding them here for a better reference and for others that maybe looking for this information

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitamin_A

I am all for eating your vitamins from food not just popping a vitamin

http://en.wikipedia....tamin_A#Sources

Vitamin A is found naturally in many foods:

I was actually  surprised with these numbers ....

 

http://en.wikipedia....bolic_functions

Vision

The role of vitamin A in the visual cycle is specifically related to the retinal form. Within the eye, 11-cis-retinal is bound to protein "opsin" to form rhodopsin in rods[3] and iodopsin (cones) at conserved lysine residues. As light enters the eye, the 11-cis-retinal is isomerized to the all-"trans" form. The all-"trans" retinal dissociates from the opsin in a series of steps called photo-bleaching. This isomerization induces a nervous signal along the optic nerve to the visual center of the brain. After separating from opsin, the all-"trans"-retinal is recycled and converted back to the 11-"cis"-retinal form by a series of enzymatic reactions. In addition, some of the all-"trans" retinal may be converted to all-"trans" retinol form and then transported with an interphotoreceptor retinol-binding protein (IRBP) to the pigment epithelial cells. Further esterification into all-"trans" retinyl esters allow for storage of all-trans-retinol within the pigment epithelial cells to be reused when needed.[22] The final stage is conversion of 11-cis-retinal will rebind to opsin to reform rhodopsin (visual purple) in the retina. Rhodopsin is needed to see in low light (contrast) as well as for night vision. Kühne showed that the regeneration of rhodopsin only occurs when retina is attached to retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE).[3] It is for this reason that a deficiency in vitamin A will inhibit the reformation of rhodopsin and lead to one of the first symptoms, night blindness.[23]

 

 

Gene transcription
Main article: Gene transcription

Vitamin A, in the retinoic acid form, plays an important role in gene transcription. Once retinol has been taken up by a cell, it can be oxidized to retinal (retinaldehyde) by retinol dehydrogenases and then retinaldehyde can be oxidized to retinoic acid by retinaldehyde dehydrogenases.[24] The conversion of retinaldehyde to retinoic acid is an irreversible step, meaning that the production of retinoic acid is tightly regulated, due to its activity as a ligand for nuclear receptors.[22] The physiological form of retinoic acid (all-trans-retinoic acid) regulates gene transcription by binding to nuclear receptors known as retinoic acid receptors (RARs) which are bound to DNA as heterodimers with retinoid "X" receptors (RXRs). RAR and RXR must dimerize before they can bind to the DNA. RAR will form a heterodimer with RXR (RAR-RXR), but it does not readily form a homodimer (RAR-RAR). RXR, on the other hand, may form a homodimer (RXR-RXR) and will form heterodimers with many other nuclear receptors as well, including the thyroid hormone receptor (RXR-TR), the Vitamin D3 receptor (RXR-VDR), the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (RXR-PPAR) and the liver "X" receptor (RXR-LXR).[25] The RAR-RXR heterodimer recognizes retinoic acid response elements (RAREs) on the DNA whereas the RXR-RXR homodimer recognizes retinoid "X" response elements (RXREs) on the DNA; although several RAREs near target genes have been shown to control physiological processes,[24] this has not been demonstrated for RXREs. The heterodimers of RXR with nuclear receptors other than RAR (i.e. TR, VDR, PPAR, LXR) bind to various distinct response elements on the DNA to control processes not regulated by vitamin A.[22] Upon binding of retinoic acid to the RAR component of the RAR-RXR heterodimer, the receptors undergo a conformational change that causes co-repressors to dissociate from the receptors. Coactivators can then bind to the receptor complex, which may help to loosen the chromatin structure from the histones or may interact with the transcriptional machinery.[25] This response can upregulate (or downregulate) the expression of target genes, including Hox genes as well as the genes that encode for the receptors themselves (i.e. RAR-beta in mammals).[22]

 

 

Dermatology

Vitamin A, and more specifically, retinoic acid, appears to maintain normal skin health by switching on genes and differentiating keratinocytes (immature skin cells) into mature epidermal cells.[26] Exact mechanisms behind pharmacological retinoid therapy agents in the treatment of dermatological diseases are being researched. For the treatment of acne, the most prescribed retinoid drug is 13-cis retinoic acid (isotretinoin). It reduces the size and secretion of the sebaceous glands. Although it is known that 40 mg of isotretinoin will break down to an equivalent of 10 mg of ATRA — the mechanism of action of the drug (original brand name Accutane) remains unknown and is a matter of some controversy. Isotretinoin reduces bacterial numbers in both the ducts and skin surface. This is thought to be a result of the reduction in sebum, a nutrient source for the bacteria. Isotretinoin reduces inflammation via inhibition of chemotactic responses of monocytes and neutrophils.[22] Isotretinoin also has been shown to initiate remodeling of the sebaceous glands; triggering changes in gene expression that selectively induce apoptosis.[27] Isotretinoin is a teratogen with a number of potential side-effects. Consequently, its use requires medical supervision.

 

Retinal/retinol versus retinoic acid

Vitamin A deprived rats can be kept in good general health with supplementation of retinoic acid. This reverses the growth-stunting effects of vitamin A deficiency, as well as early stages of xerophthalmia. However, such rats show infertility (in both male and females) and continued degeneration of the retina, showing that these functions require retinal or retinol, which are intraconvertable but which cannot be recovered from the oxidized retinoic acid. The requirement of retinol to rescue reproduction in vitamin A deficient rats is now known to be due to a requirement for local synthesis of retinoic acid from retinol in testis and embryos.[28][29]

 

http://en.wikipedia....in_A#Deficiency

Deficiency
Main article: Vitamin A deficiency

Vitamin A deficiency is estimated to affect approximately one third of children under the age of five around the world.[30] It is estimated to claim the lives of 670,000 children under five annually.[31] Approximately 250,000–500,000 children in developing countries become blind each year owing to vitamin A deficiency, with the highest prevalence in Southeast Asia and Africa.[32]

Vitamin A deficiency can occur as either a primary or a secondary deficiency. A primary vitamin A deficiency occurs among children and adults who do not consume an adequate intake of provitamin A carotenoids from fruits and vegetables or preformed vitamin A from animal and dairy products. Early weaning from breastmilk can also increase the risk of vitamin A deficiency.

Secondary vitamin A deficiency is associated with chronic malabsorption of lipids, impaired bile production and release, and chronic exposure to oxidants, such as cigarette smoke, and chronic alcoholism. Vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin and depends on micellar solubilization for dispersion into the small intestine, which results in poor use of vitamin A from low-fat diets. Zinc deficiency can also impair absorption, transport, and metabolism of vitamin A because it is essential for the synthesis of the vitamin A transport proteins and as the cofactor in conversion of retinol to retinal. In malnourished populations, common low intakes of vitamin A and zinc increase the severity of vitamin A deficiency and lead physiological signs and symptoms of deficiency.[22] A study in Burkina Faso showed major reduction of malaria morbidity with combined vitamin A and zinc supplementation in young children.[33]

Due to the unique function of retinal as a visual chromophore, one of the earliest and specific manifestations of vitamin A deficiency is impaired vision, particularly in reduced light – night blindness. Persistent deficiency gives rise to a series of changes, the most devastating of which occur in the eyes. Some other ocular changes are referred to as xerophthalmia. First there is dryness of the conjunctiva (xerosis) as the normal lacrimal and mucus-secreting epithelium is replaced by a keratinized epithelium. This is followed by the build-up of keratin debris in small opaque plaques (Bitot's spots) and, eventually, erosion of the roughened corneal surface with softening and destruction of the cornea (keratomalacia) and leading to total blindness.[34] Other changes include impaired immunity (increased risk of ear infections, urinary tract infections, Meningococcal disease), hyperkeratosis (white lumps at hair follicles), keratosis pilaris and squamous metaplasia of the epithelium lining the upper respiratory passages and urinary bladder to a keratinized epithelium. With relations to dentistry, a deficiency in Vitamin A leads to enamel hypoplasia.

Adequate supply, but not excess vitamin A, is especially important for pregnant and breastfeeding women for normal fetal development and in breastmilk. Deficiencies cannot be compensated by postnatal supplementation.[35][36] Excess vitamin A, which is most common with high dose vitamin supplements, can cause birth defects and therefore should not exceed recommended daily values.[24]

Vitamin A metabolic inhibition as a result of alcohol consumption during pregnancy is the elucidated mechanism for fetal alcohol syndrome and is characterized by teratogenicity closely matching maternal vitamin A deficiency.[37]

 

 

Toxicity
Main article: Hypervitaminosis A

Since vitamin A is fat-soluble, disposing of any excesses taken in through diet takes much longer than with water-soluble B vitamins and vitamin C. This allows for toxic levels of vitamin A to accumulate.

In general, acute toxicity occurs at doses of 25,000 IU/kg of body weight, with chronic toxicity occurring at 4,000 IU/kg of body weight daily for 6–15 months.[44] However, liver toxicities can occur at levels as low as 15,000 IU (4500 micrograms) per day to 1.4 million IU per day, with an average daily toxic dose of 120,000 IU per day, particularly with excessive consumption of alcohol .[citation needed] In people with renal failure, 4000 IU can cause substantial damage. Children can reach toxic levels at 1,500 IU/kg of body weight.[45]

Excessive vitamin A consumption can lead to nausea, irritability, anorexia (reduced appetite), vomiting, blurry vision, headaches, hair loss, muscle and abdominal pain and weakness, drowsiness, and altered mental status. In chronic cases, hair loss, dry skin, drying of the mucous membranes, fever, insomnia, fatigue, weight loss, bone fractures, anemia, and diarrhea can all be evident on top of the symptoms associated with less serious toxicity.[46] Some of these symptoms are also common to acne treatment with Isotretinoin. Chronically high doses of vitamin A, and also pharmaceutical retinoids such as 13-cis retinoic acid, can produce the syndrome of pseudotumor cerebri.[47] This syndrome includes headache, blurring of vision and confusion, associated with increased intracerebral pressure. Symptoms begin to resolve when intake of the offending substance is stopped.[48]

Chronic intake of 1500 RAE of preformed vitamin A may be associated with osteoporosis and hip fractures because it suppresses bone building while simultaneously stimulating bone breakdown.[49]

High vitamin A intake has been associated with spontaneous bone fractures in animals. Cell culture studies have linked increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation with high intakes. This interaction may occur because vitamins A and D may compete for the same receptor and then interact with parathyroid hormone, which regulates calcium.[45] Indeed, a study by Forsmo et al. shows a correlation between low bone mineral density and too high intake of vitamin A.[50] Sufficiently high levels of vitamin D may be protective against the bone density lowering effects of high vitamin A, while inadequate levels of vitamin D may exacerbate those effects.[51][52][53][54]

Toxic effects of vitamin A have been shown to significantly affect developing fetuses. Therapeutic doses used for acne treatment have been shown to disrupt cephalic neural cell activity. The fetus is particularly sensitive to vitamin A toxicity during the period of organogenesis.[22] These toxicities only occur with preformed (retinoid) vitamin A (such as from liver). The carotenoid forms (such as beta-carotene as found in carrots), give no such symptoms, except with supplements and chronic alcoholism, but excessive dietary intake of beta-carotene can lead to carotenodermia, which causes orange-yellow discoloration of the skin.[55][56][57]

Hepatic (liver) injury has been found in human and animal studies where consumption of alcohol is paired with high dose vitamin A and beta-carotene supplementation.

Researchers have succeeded in creating water-soluble forms of vitamin A, which they believed could reduce the potential for toxicity.[58] However, a 2003 study found water-soluble vitamin A was approximately 10 times as toxic as fat-soluble vitamin.[59] A 2006 study found children given water-soluble vitamin A and D, which are typically fat-soluble, suffer from asthma twice as much as a control group supplemented with the fat-soluble vitamins.[60]

In some studies, the use of Vitamin A supplements has been linked to an increased rate of mortality,[61] but there is minimal evidence to show this.[62]

 

I have some books here about vitamins and I am going to look threw them and add change anything in the above found on Wikipedia

Thanks for your time :)



#19 onediadem

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 01:38 PM

This thread is awsome WildE...I have avoided almost all bread and anything that has flour. This is awesome.


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#20 Shadowlord

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 02:45 PM

Glad to have seen this thread. Superliminal is gluten intolerant and this will help out. Hoping to have enough trim saved up soon to make some gluten free medicated goodies.
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