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Heating your home and water in the winter with wood.


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#21 pharmer

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 12:36 PM

any advice about the number of 90 degree turns or length of the run, etc?



#22 pharmer

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 03:23 PM

and just to be clear

 

Juthro, your system has the glycol running directly through the water box?



#23 Juthro

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 06:07 PM

Hello my friend, I hope you are having a nice holiday.

 

As far as how long to make your runs, I would first decide if you are going to make a single run, or make a manifold system.  A single run is easy but, it won’t heat as even as a manifold system, where it goes first will get more heat than where it goes next.  My house system has a single run system.   

I have a manifold in the garage, that way it heats the concrete evenly and I don’t have hot and cold sections.  I split the width of a double car garage into four zones, and they all get fed with the same temp glycol.  And yes, the water box  in the house is glycol filled, as is the heat exchanger above the firebox in the shops system.

 

Here is a pic of the shop system to show what I am talking about.

manifold.jpg

 



#24 pharmer

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 05:13 AM

I spent most of Thursday helping Mrs Pharmer cook. Low stress, high calorie :) I hope your day was as pleasant.

 

Spent much of yesterday on the net searching for a local supplier of stuff, and the rest of the day at the Big Box looking at the nuts and bolts and trying to wrap my head around the whole thing. I've done some plumbing in the past so this all looks quite do-able for a homeowner/non-plumbing professional.

 

I won't be pouring any concrete soon but I'm curious. Did you use standard 5/6 bag concrete or light-crete?  I seem to remember seeing the home improvement TV shows years ago running pipe through concrete but they were using light-crete. Now that I think about it that probably had to do with it being interior and residential application. It's not like they were going to have to drive and park a car on it.

 

And I should have asked the question about the liquid in the system this way, though you answered it quite clearly - is the glycol rated to take the intense heat inside the heat exchanger immediately above the fire box?

 

Where do you fill the system with glycol and how do you burp any air out of it? Or is air not an issue as with a water/steam system? I'll be having the heat exchanger fabricated so I'm thinking about having a threaded (or otherwise cap-able) port built right onto the top plate of the exchange since it's the highest point in the system. I'm guessing/hoping it's just as easy as sticking a funnel in it and pouring until it's full.


Edited by pharmer, 30 November 2013 - 05:23 AM.


#25 Juthro

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 01:46 PM

I’ll start with the Q about the concrete.  It is standard conventional concrete.  Next, how to fill.  I have a threaded bung in the top of the water box.  So you are correct, a funnel and just fill, run it to burp the air, and fill again.

 

Before I forget, I want to remind you, you absolutely have to have an emergency pop off valve (just like the kind on your hot water heater) somewhere on your system, so that if something goes wrong you don’t have a bomb on your hands.  I would also advice plumping it so that if ever does pop, it blows its boiling hot sticky liquid somewhere of your choosing.

 

I would also advice using a pressure tank like I pictured earlier to help deal with the thermal expansion of the heat exchange liquid.  I looked them up on Ama-zon, and they’re asking about $30.  It is money well spent if it keeps your system from opening the pop off and spilling your expensive coolant.

 

As far as the standard plumbing with the PEX lines, I have had great success with Shark Bite brand fittings.  They are a piece of cake to use, don’t require any tools, and I have never had a single problem with any of their products.  I’m sure that there are other products that work well, I just thought I would share my preference.

 

peace and friendship

Juth


Edited by Juthro, 30 November 2013 - 01:47 PM.

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#26 twoguysupnorth

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 12:35 PM

 We have an outdoor system that needs to be recovered and insulated this year but the first year it was amazing. (was already at the house) Last year was horrible for snow and cold-COLD weather so we burned too much comparatively. We dont use glycol because it is so close to the house and we dont have floor circulation but forced air through the furnace and a radiator in the ducts. It hits a water tank first through double pipes (forget atm what it is called) Like a condensor for a distillation unit except for heat instead of cooling. Basicly 2 loops. I love the thing but for the insulation issue and we have to restrict water flow at the hot water tank for more heat to water in the summer. Other than that its perfect. 


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#27 Juthro

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 12:55 PM

Sounds like a nice system. I do like wood heat.
When you say it needs better insulated are you talking about the lines running from the wood fired furnace (outside) to the house?

#28 the_chosen_one

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 12:57 PM

 I have had great success with Shark Bite brand fittings.  They are a piece of cake to use, don’t require any tools, and I have never had a single problem with any of their products.  I’m sure that there are other products that work well, I just thought I would share my preference.

 

peace and friendship

Juth

sharkbite is da shiz :smile:


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#29 twoguysupnorth

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 10:06 AM

 The whole unit itself, the boiler, needs re wrapped in insulation and a better shed built around it. We have only had a frozen pipe once the first year after a power outage so apparently they buried and insulated them well.


Edited by twoguysupnorth, 08 June 2014 - 10:06 AM.

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#30 twoguysupnorth

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 08:21 AM

 I agree on collecting the wood also. My whole jail thing screwed us last year and then my truck broke down. Just my luck, it isnt fixable either. Im waiting on a new opportunity for a truck and at this point I cant afford insurance anyways. My partners insurance almost doubled after i got in trouble so we have to say we dont live together atm. Anyways, our new property is surrounded by thousands of state land acres where we can cut wood :) We found one of my old friends who will drop off 2-5 cords at a time for $50 a cord. That is about 20$ cheaper than anyone else is doing it right now. When we can get enough together to buy some pulp cords, we could even cut that cost in about half but you need to buy a lot at a time for the savings. 



#31 BillyThKid

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 11:31 PM

Suprised this is still going on. You guys are all going over how to build a stove LIKE the one i posted about i assume?

 

 

good luck, its a great thing to do, we need to stop burning oil and gas for heat, wood is carbon neutral and thous of us who choose to do it are proud to put up with a little smoke.

 

 

Granted everyone cant use these but look at this: the one model up from my wood stove is meant for apartment heating. there is a person in my town heating water and air of the apartments all by his wood stove. he saves so much on water and electricity in the winter from the wood stove heating all the apartments

 

 

Its a brilliant idea, but on a stove like mine i was a battery of some sort and a solar pannel to hook in just incase of power outage. I need the fan to run to keep the first going correct



#32 pharmer

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Posted 19 October 2014 - 08:09 AM

Billy,

 

I'm about to find a welder to fabricate the holding/heating tank for the glycol circulatory system.

 

Should I be concerned about rust in that tank? Is the glycol likely to rust steel? Should I consider stainless steel or some other exotic steel or is any old stuff going to be just fine?

 

My guess is that as long as the holding tank is topped off with fluid there's no chance for moisture to form in the loop and rust will not damage or overcome the loop.

 

Also, what size plastic tubing did you use? Would you go larger now that you've lived with yours for a while?






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