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What did you do to your cacti/botanical garden today (pictures welcome)


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#21 nomadicAI

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 01:45 PM

I'm replanting because they were overcrowded in their previous container. I chose the material because it's fast-draining and airy.

 

What's your mix then? Surely more than just the clay?



#22 BillyThKid

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 01:51 PM

 

I'm replanting because they were overcrowded in their previous container. I chose the material because it's fast-draining and airy.

 

What's your mix then? Surely more than just the clay?

 

Believe it or not peyote and many other cacti grow well in some kinds of clay. In the wild both peyote and ariocarpus are found growing out of lime stone as well as in muddy areas wityh loads of clay and lime stone mixed together and im sure it lives in other soils here and there.

 

Most cacti require very little nutrient, so long as the soil is quick draining it will work. Now clay like Tobacco Red clay is not good for growing cacti, at least so par as i know. BUt other clay works.

 

i have learned everyone has their own soil mixes by now. Im trying a new soil mix from the one last year which was 40% not peat moss based top soil with all the wood chips removed, 30% course sand, 20% lime stone pellets and 10% coconut coir.

 

This year im switching to something around 30% of the similar top soil, 10% composted leached manure, 25% course sand, 15% perlite 10% lime stone and 10% other including minor amounts of peat based soil from other pots i threw in the mix. 

 

So long as it is well draining and wont rot them they will grow in it pretty much. I have seen them grow in packing peanuts 


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#23 MrGumball

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 01:54 PM

Believe it or not peyote and many other cacti grow well in some kinds of clay. In the wild both peyote and ariocarpus are found growing out of lime stone as well as in muddy areas wityh loads of clay and lime stone mixed together and im sure it lives in other soils here and there.

 

Do you have a link to that information?



#24 Fakeman

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 02:04 PM

IIRC L. koehresii and L. alberto-vojtechii both grow in mud flats and even stay completely submerged in water for extended periods. The material I was talking about is much different than using a clay soil though. It's more like crushed pottery.



#25 MrGumball

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 02:12 PM

IIRC L. koehresii and L. alberto-vojtechii both grow in mud flats and even stay completely submerged in water for extended periods. The material I was talking about is much different than using a clay soil though. It's more like crushed pottery.

 

At least L. alberto-vojtechii does:

 


Our mini-peyote is found growing in flat, alluvial sediments, which transform during rain periods into greasy mud flats. L. alberto-vojtechii has a distinctively geophytic lifestyle: in dry periods it withers and withdraws into small cavities below ground, where wind covers them over with dust and dry leaves, which protect the plants from harsh sunlight. When rains arrive, the plants absorb water and swell, pushing the photosynthetic crown back up above ground level.
 

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#26 1967FordTitus

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 02:22 PM

Hey, MrGumball, great link, that book rocks, I have it on order.

#27 BillyThKid

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 03:20 PM

350 total seeds for me to play with. YAY

 

This is the kind of beautiful trade I like. Someone on a forum sent me these 14 different hybrid Trichocereus cacti. Most of them are all named hybrids bred with other named hybrids and it's all from sacred succulent so they have been well trusted to have their info right.

 

The species are: 1 T. Huanuciensis X Peruvian torch "serra blue"

2 T. Huanuciensis X pervians torch juul' jean hybrid.

3 T. Peruvianus 'serra blue' X Trichocereus SS02 clone which is a bridgesii of some sort.

4 T. Peruvianus 'serra blue' X T. Huanuciensis

5 trichocereus species 'Luther Burbank' X Trichocereus SS02

6 trichocereus SS01 X Trichocereus pachanoi

7 trichocereus SS02 X T. Huanuciensis

8 trichocereus SS02 X juuls giant hybrid

9 trichocereus SS02 X Trichocereus peruvianus 'serra blue'

10 trichocereus SS02 X Trichocereus 'Luther burbank'

11 trichocereus SS02 X Trichocereus SS01

12 trichocereus pachanoi f. Monstrosus X Trichocereus SS02

13 trichocereus juuls giant X Trichocereus SS02.

14 trichocereus validus X Trichocereus 'lumberjack'

 

Yea that's a lot of new hybrids I can't wait to grow them all.

 

I planted number 12 and 11 today because i wanna see what that pachanoi monstrose does.

 

Supposedly all these seeds came from sacred succulent

 

 


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#28 nomadicAI

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 05:04 AM

 

Believe it or not peyote and many other cacti grow well in some kinds of clay. In the wild both peyote and ariocarpus are found growing out of lime stone as well as in muddy areas wityh loads of clay and lime stone mixed together and im sure it lives in other soils here and there.

 

Most cacti require very little nutrient, so long as the soil is quick draining it will work. Now clay like Tobacco Red clay is not good for growing cacti, at least so par as i know. BUt other clay works.

 

i have learned everyone has their own soil mixes by now. Im trying a new soil mix from the one last year which was 40% not peat moss based top soil with all the wood chips removed, 30% course sand, 20% lime stone pellets and 10% coconut coir.

 

This year im switching to something around 30% of the similar top soil, 10% composted leached manure, 25% course sand, 15% perlite 10% lime stone and 10% other including minor amounts of peat based soil from other pots i threw in the mix. 

 

So long as it is well draining and wont rot them they will grow in it pretty much. I have seen them grow in packing peanuts 

 

 

 

IIRC L. koehresii and L. alberto-vojtechii both grow in mud flats and even stay completely submerged in water for extended periods. The material I was talking about is much different than using a clay soil though. It's more like crushed pottery.

 

Really interesting, thanks for sharing that.

 

A pet hate of mine is using perlite for soil mixes.

 

I have seen in soil mixes from cacti nurseries that they tend to make a mix with sand, some soil, crushed hydro pellets, stones and coco coir. Naturally no wood chips. Problem with trying to emulate that is that in most garden centres around here they only have very poor quality sand for use in play pits and pretty much any soil is full of wood chips or fibres.

 

I also read that perlite could maybe be substituted with non absorbent kitty litter but have not tried that yet.

 

Any other suggestions are welcome!

 

350 total seeds for me to play with. YAY

 

This is the kind of beautiful trade I like. Someone on a forum sent me these 14 different hybrid Trichocereus cacti. Most of them are all named hybrids bred with other named hybrids and it's all from sacred succulent so they have been well trusted to have their info right.

 

The species are: 1 T. Huanuciensis X Peruvian torch "serra blue"

2 T. Huanuciensis X pervians torch juul' jean hybrid.

3 T. Peruvianus 'serra blue' X Trichocereus SS02 clone which is a bridgesii of some sort.

4 T. Peruvianus 'serra blue' X T. Huanuciensis

5 trichocereus species 'Luther Burbank' X Trichocereus SS02

6 trichocereus SS01 X Trichocereus pachanoi

7 trichocereus SS02 X T. Huanuciensis

8 trichocereus SS02 X juuls giant hybrid

9 trichocereus SS02 X Trichocereus peruvianus 'serra blue'

10 trichocereus SS02 X Trichocereus 'Luther burbank'

11 trichocereus SS02 X Trichocereus SS01

12 trichocereus pachanoi f. Monstrosus X Trichocereus SS02

13 trichocereus juuls giant X Trichocereus SS02.

14 trichocereus validus X Trichocereus 'lumberjack'

 

Yea that's a lot of new hybrids I can't wait to grow them all.

 

I planted number 12 and 11 today because i wanna see what that pachanoi monstrose does.

 

Supposedly all these seeds came from sacred succulent

 

I once had a collection like that but before I had the chance to sow them they were rudely taken away.

 

Hope you get some amazing plants!
 


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#29 1967FordTitus

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 07:42 AM

Great luck with those Kid.
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#30 BillyThKid

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 11:58 AM

Hey Normadic i never used perlite till this year. I am giving it a shot in a shoil mixture i saw what had great results for germination and humidity.

 

 

Perlite can do anything and everything vermiculite, dom, and all the others do. IT just help keeps the soil from compacting as well as making it more free draining. 

 

 

I have no problems with wood chips in my soil anymore after i switched to Black Kow brand which uses only nutrient rich soil and manure with no wood in it. Before i used that i just sifted all the wood out.

 

Why do you not like perlite?

 

 

 

Also yea i am hopeful for these seeds. i have been doing some reading on the trichocereus peruvianus Serra blue but not much info on it



#31 nomadicAI

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 12:46 PM

I learnt on Topia, one day, that perlite is a non renewable resource which is one reason I don't like it.

 

Another is that inhaling the dust from it is harmful.

 

But more than those two reasons I hate it because it is really messy. It get's everywhere and is painful to clean up. And I don't like the way the soil looks once it has been mixed in. Looks unnatural.

 

But so I was browsing around and found that the following can be substituted for perlite:

  • Diatomite
  • Expanded clay
  • Shale
  • Pumice
  • Slag
  • Vermiculite (as you already mentioned Billy)

So, now I know why the cacti nurseries use crushed clay pellets. I must figure out a way to crush the pellets and reckon I will go that route, next summer that is. Already done enough repotting for one year.


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#32 1967FordTitus

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 01:03 PM

Great thread, great info. I use coir instead of peat, and since I learned about perlite being non-renewable, I stopped using it, switched to clay pellets, crushed oyster shells, and pumice.
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#33 shugz

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 02:18 PM

Vermiculite and perlite are both non-organic soil additives that are used to aerate the soil. As rooting mediums, they offer this same benefit. Vermiculite is a spongy material made from mica whereas perlite is a type of highly porous volcanic glass that resembles pumice. Perlite appears as small, round, non-uniform, white particles. Some people mistake perlite in potting soil mixtures for Styrofoam balls. While both mediums are used for aeration, they cannot always be used interchangeably.

Both perlite and vermiculite are great at retaining water, but vermiculite retains much more water and offers a little less aeration than perlite. Vermiculite literally acts as a sponge that will retain water to the point of saturation. Perlite holds water by having a large amount of surface area within the nooks and crevices of its vast pores. But being porous and made of volcanic glass it allows excess water to drain much more readily than vermiculite.

In a case where you have especially thirsty plants and want the soil to hold extra water, vermiculite would be a better choice. You might find that perlite will dry out too quickly in this situation. But if you were growing cacti, you would eventually discover that the amount of water vermiculite holds would lead your plants to rot. Perlite, on the other hand, would be well-draining and suitable for your cacti mixture.

Vermiculite is also used in mycology to add moisture to the substrate that mushrooms will grow on. Perlite would fail miserably at this task. Perlite can also be used in mycology or horticulture to raise humidity levels. Because perlite has more surface area, it fosters higher humidity by evaporation off this extra surface area. Vermiculite would not work as well for this though because it would retain much more of that water.

So essentially, perlite and vermiculite are the same in that they can retain more water than many other things, and they can aerate soil. But vermiculite differs from perlite because it retains water and creates a soil mixture that retains water, whereas perlite fosters a well-draining soil mixture. Likewise, vermiculite’s tendency to retain water makes it a good additive to mushroom substrates but a bad candidate for increasing humidity. Perlite’s hard, porous nature makes it a great mechanism for increasing the humidity of a given area but disqualifies it as a candidate for creating a substrate that will retain moisture.
 


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#34 Fakeman

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 03:16 PM

turface seedlings jun 6.jpg

 

These are the seedlings I was replanting yesterday. There are still some left from that batch I still need to replant but I can only keep at it for so long before my neck gets tired.


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#35 1967FordTitus

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 04:05 PM

Wow, very nice! GGVYW!

#36 shugz

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 04:20 PM

nice germination rates.. i haven't been able to get many of my williamsii to spout, only 5 out of 30, so i didn't know if it was because of me or if the seeds were going bad.  ive had much better luck with the multiple different p. torch (matucana, ancash, and puquiensis) and t. bridgesii seeds i bought and just haven't been able to find a good supplier of williamsii  that isn't sketchy or the listing is all wacky.  ive been looking and until i can find a good price and isn't sketchy i bought 100 P. torch (rio lurin) to add to the collection

 

 

 

 

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#37 Fakeman

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 04:45 PM

Usually I'm happy if I can get 50% germination with commercial peyote seeds, rarely I've seen as high as about 80%. The seedlings in the pic I posted were from a batch of 1000 v. texana seeds. Haven't counted the remaining ones but I think there are about 300 already planted.

 

The place I buy from is pretty reputable and affordable (40 euros/1000) but I'm not sure if they would ship to anywhere they were illegal. I forget if we're allowed to name suppliers here but the owner is the guy that L. koehresii is named after.


Edited by Fakeman, 08 June 2014 - 04:48 PM.

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#38 1967FordTitus

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 05:23 PM

shugz, beautiful stuff!

This freaking thread is freaking overflowing with info and gorgeous porn!

Lovin' it, 1967~(;{P"

#39 BillyThKid

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 09:29 PM

Wow guys thread is really taking off.

 

 

on the note of perlite. i knew what it was and where it came from. when working with it i alwase poke lots of holes in the bottom of a 5 or 10 pound bad of the stuff and flood it with a hose, That way any chemicals or fertilizer on it will be washed off and i pressure cook it afterwards before i use it in the soil.

 

 

I actually came across Diatomite the other day on a forum. I found out Napa auto stores sell it in a form much like cat litter and its not treated with anything. And its cheap as hell. i am going to pick me up a bag soon and plant some cacti in for testing. if i test more than one kind of soil i can find what works best for the cacti and myself.


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#40 teesus

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 05:33 AM

I dislike perlite for soil, too. I use pumice for my catus soil since a while, and I think its a very good stuff.

Its readily availible (germany) as grit for iced sidewalks, especially in winter. I always leach it out before use because I had batches with salt contamination, normally it should be good to use from the bag.

pum.jpg


Edited by teesus, 09 June 2014 - 07:19 AM.





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