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Mango Wine?


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#1 Cindysid

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 12:46 PM

First of all I am not much of a drinker and I have never made wine, but I've got these 4 big mango trees in the yard and i have frozen about all I've got room for and thought it might be fun to make some wine.  The mangos are very sweet and that sounds good to me because when it comes to alcohol, I'm a real lightweight, and I prefer sweet fruity drinks....I know...I'm a candyass!   Has anyone ever made it?  What kind of equipment do I need to make wine?  Would it be expensive to buy the stuff I need?



#2 SilvrHairDevil

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 01:11 PM

If you're starting from scratch there's a bit of equipment cost to deal with. This can often be offset by posting Free Winemaking Equipment Wanted notices on the grocery store's bulletin boards. 

 

To start, you'd want a 20 gal food grade plastic primary fermenter, a 5 gal (glass preferred) carboy, some tubing and siphoning gear, a couple 1-hole stoppers with airlocks, a quart of concentrated grape juice and a few chemicals.

 

A better option might be for you to find a winemaker's supply store and talk to them. There are kits available and some places  will do the fermenting for you on their premises. 



#3 TurkeyRanch

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 01:16 PM

7 gallon brew buckets are pretty cheap also, and often come with a bung and airlock. Big investment is a nice huge pot, but who doesn't want that toy? I have a few big pots, and I use them all the time, they are a good thing to have around.

Mango wine sounds awesome.

#4 Cindysid

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 01:32 PM

I have huge pots, so no problem with that.  I will find a store in my area and check it out.  I grow a lot of fruit, mangos, guava, starfruit, elderberry, papaya, jaboticaba, lychee, banana, pineapple, strawberries and watermelon, so the possibilities are endless. Like I said, I'm not a big drinker, but I have a lot of friends who are so inclined and I love playing the mad scientist!



#5 SilvrHairDevil

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 01:43 PM

Pots??



#6 Cindysid

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 02:10 PM

Pots??

Don't ask me but TR says I need one! LOL



#7 Spooner

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 01:54 PM

A new diaper pail from wallyworld makes a good cheap primary fermenter.  

Fleichmans yeast from grocerystore is adequate to start as a yeast.

Once the initial bubbling slows down to a managable level, you can decant into gallon jugs with a balloon on top.

The balloon is important it keeps vinegar yeasts from contaminating the wine. daily release the balloon to let the co2 escape.

A hydrometer and one way bubbliers are good investment as is a 5 gallon carboy, but not exactly required.

You can add sugar if all the sugars get turned to alcohol.

 

Highly recommend a trip to library or used bookstore, 

Folk Wines, Cordials, and Brandies by Jagendorf

it is a good read lots great stories and a lifetime of recipies,


Edited by Spooner, 17 August 2014 - 01:57 PM.

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#8 SilvrHairDevil

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 04:25 PM

A new diaper pail from wallyworld makes a good cheap primary fermenter.  

 

Wallyworld diaper pails are infused with deodorizers to keep smells down. You really don't want this in your wine. Use food grade plastic only.

 

Fleischmann's yeast from grocerystore is adequate to start as a yeast.

 

Fleischmann's yeast is designed to make lots of carbon dioxide to rise bread dough. Wine yeasts from the winemaker's supply are designed to make alcohol and enhanced flavor. And they are cheaper.

 

Once the initial bubbling slows down to a managable level, you can decant into gallon jugs with a balloon on top.

The balloon is important it keeps vinegar yeasts from contaminating the wine. daily release the balloon to let the co2 escape.

 

Vinegar is made when acetobacter bacteria from fruit flies eat the alcohol and convert it to vinegar. There's no such thing as "vinegar yeast".

 

A hydrometer and one way bubbliers are good investment as is a 5 gallon carboy, but not exactly required.

You can add sugar if all the sugars get turned to alcohol.

 

Correct.

 

Highly recommend a trip to library or used bookstore, 

 

Also correct.

 

Folk Wines, Cordials, and Brandies by Jagendorf

it is a good read lots great stories and a lifetime of recipies,


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#9 Spooner

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 05:19 PM

The diaper pails I bought were marked PP5, were white, had no smell, had a top and I am not dead after 40 years, but as you say perhaps pails from restaurant would be safer. My Chinese restaurant gives me 5 gallon pails that they get soy sauce in and once washed they also do not have soy smell.

 

I have personally made 13% meads with fleichmans, perhaps as you say it made more co2 and explains my raucous primary ferm.  I have also used wine yeasts but if availability is a problem fleichmans produced perfectly satisfactory results, and for my meads, I never tasted a difference.  Mead is not really a delicate brew.

 

Thanks for info on vinegar, It happened to me a couple times when balloons blew off, never with the "S" bubbler, used the mead vinegar for salad dressing was very good with olive oil and oregano soaked for couple weeks. 

 

My ex wife threw away all my 5 gallon carboys and wine shop wants $40 bucks for new glass ones any ideas where to get cheap or reasonable subs would be appreciated Silver.  Currently i just have several one gallon jugs going, but I miss the blub, blub sound of a 5 gallon carboy with bubbler working it's way to Heaven.

 

P.S. The Jagendorf book is strictly folk wines, very few grape wines,  mostly fruits, berries, vegetables, flowers and herbs.  Each recipe has a story goes with it about where he got the recipe or how he liked the wines, fun reading and very informative.


Edited by Spooner, 17 August 2014 - 05:29 PM.


#10 SilvrHairDevil

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 01:02 PM

As I mentioned in my first post above, you can often get cheap or free equipment just by asking for it via notices on bulletin boards. people get tired of all the work involved and their equipment gets stored in a basement or wherever.

 

When I googled diaper pail, the first hit was walmart and every one was labelled "odor-free". There may be differences in what they stock between here (Canada) and wherever you are located.

 

As to the yeast, there are oenological scientists constantly working on yeast profiles to produce the best possible attenuation and flavors.

 

While bread yeast will certainly cause fermentation, you will get a better product if you use the yeast designed for it. BTW - for cider, beer yeast is often recommended.

 

So, Cindy, when you get your equipment lined up, post again and we'll get your mango wine started.

 

For fruit wines, there are many specialized yeasts available, depending on how acidic the fruit is.


Edited by SilvrHairDevil, 18 August 2014 - 01:03 PM.

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