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Truffles?


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#1 TrippyHippie

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 04:54 PM

Does anybody know how to grow mushroom truffles?

#2 Pilzkopf

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 05:08 PM

I wish I were a moderator so I could move this to the proper area, but...

Truffles, like some other species (amanita muscaria, for example) of mushroom, are considered mycorrhizae. This means that they *will not* grow and produce fruit unless they're growing on the roots of another plant.

Some varieties of trees inoculated with truffle mycelium are available, here - http://truffletree.com/order/

From what I read, it's not recommended to have fewer than 500 trees in the area where you're attempting to grow truffles, since the mycelial network may not be strong enough for a good-quality crop. This is, of course, from a two-minute google search.


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#3 Cindysid

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 05:17 PM

I tried to grow the psychedelic kind last year...total fail.  I may try again before long.


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#4 AGAMA

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 06:14 PM

I wish I were a moderator so I could move this to the proper area, but...
 

got it...


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#5 dead head jed

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 06:23 PM

What kind of truffels?

#6 Pilzkopf

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 07:10 PM

Ah...he could mean psilocybin sclerotia.. Good point.



#7 esculenta

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 01:16 PM

So...what's your question? The first truffle orchard in North America is near me. Now there are many starting up. Most planted in the last few years and many probably will fail. There was a farm in Canada that harvested their first truffle last year! Truffles grow all over the world, from the Sahara to Pacific Northwest, but most of them don't have the aromatic compounds that make black and white European truffles so sought after.

#8 esculenta

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 01:17 PM

Oh and I'm going to inoculate and plant my own trees some day. Unless I can make $10,000 to buy enough to plant an acre or so.

#9 TrippyHippie

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 02:31 PM

Sorry about putting this in the wrong place AGAMA, this is my first time on a forum I'm still trying to figure it out. I was just curious as to how psychedelic truffles were grown, and what makes them grow.

#10 Pilzkopf

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 04:43 PM

Ah, you are talking about psychedelic sclerotia!

They are a completely different beast. Let me do a bit of research. I'll get back to you.

Edit: There are psilocybin mushrooms that produce sclerotia in the genus Cubensis, but they also produce normal fruits under proper conditions. They are grown in an enclosed space and not allowed to fruit normally. They end up running out of food and, in order to preserve themselves for future growth, should more food become available, they form a hard mass of mycelium, which can be likened to a truffle.

Then there's another psilocybe strain, which does not fruit like cubensis strains. Researching...
Or, maybe I'm wrong. All I'm finding is Galindoi and Tampanensis, which both produce normal fruits. I could have sworn there was one that only formed sclerotia...

By the way, sorry for getting your thread moved. Apparently, you were just using improper terminology.


Edited by Pilzkopf, 20 August 2014 - 05:02 PM.


#11 MrGumball

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 04:55 PM




Edit: There are psilocybin mushrooms that produce sclerotia in the genus Cubensis, but they also produce normal fruits under proper conditions. They are grown in an enclosed space and not allowed to fruit normally. They end up running out of food and, in order to preserve themselves for future growth, should more food become available, they form a hard mass of mycelium, which can be likened to a truffle.

 

1.  Psilocybe is the genus, cubensis is the species

 

2.  Psilocybe cubensis DOES NOT produce sclerotia

 

Stonesun has more than a few threads on the culivation of sclerotia producing species, here's a few:

 

Psilocybe mexicana/Jalisco Pictures

Psilocybe galindoi/ATL#7 Simple Fruiting

Psilocybe mexicana/A Fruiting


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#12 Pilzkopf

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 05:04 PM

Thanks, Mr. Gumball. I meant the genus psilocybe. My bad!



#13 mycopiac

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Posted 15 April 2017 - 05:08 PM

I wish I were a moderator so I could move this to the proper area, but...

Truffles, like some other species (amanita muscaria, for example) of mushroom, are considered mycorrhizae. This means that they *will not* grow and produce fruit unless they're growing on the roots of another plant.

Some varieties of trees inoculated with truffle mycelium are available, here - http://truffletree.com/order/

From what I read, it's not recommended to have fewer than 500 trees in the area where you're attempting to grow truffles, since the mycelial network may not be strong enough for a good-quality crop. This is, of course, from a two-minute google search.

Do you know of walnut trees would work well, i already have that.



#14 Spliff

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Posted 15 April 2017 - 10:14 PM

Do you know of walnut trees would work well, i already have that.

Not to take this thread off topic, since talking about psychedelic sclerotia. However with truffles, from my limited understanding, I believe the roots need to be inoculated when planting the trees. Its not like you can dig up the roots and do it that way. I toured a truffle farm, and the guy there says they use a "slurry" when planting their trees. That is all I could get out of him, he smiled when I spoke about if it was like shiitake logs and dowels.

So from my imagination, I would think they would shape and flood the hole in a particular way that allows the tree roots to be in the slurry.

There are many different types of truffles, some are valuable and some are utter worthless / undesirable. Make sure you get the right one. I would imagine this affects the types of trees and soil you would use.

 

Beware of blight. There is an epidemic blight problem in some countries = no export, quarantine, plantation destroyed.

 

Interesting fact, the types of trees you use will affect the flavour of the truffle. The farm I visited had almonds, which was done to give a chocolate aroma.

 

You are aware truffles grow under ground right? You need a way to find them. Pigs are alright but they eat the truffles, so you need to be quick on the intercept. Dogs are the bomb. I know a guy who trained dogs for the police force, he now is a contractor truffle finder, brings his dogs to other people's farms and finds them. Takes about 45 minutes to run through a plantation, gets paid a percentage of weight value (What a dream).

 

Lastly, I think there is some risk in ordering pre-inoculated trees. Like, some will say they are but are not really. Also the type of truffle they say it is might not be. Low success rate on older saplings. My advice would be to purchase from a plantation directly that provides them. Tough ask but you don't wanna wait 5 years to find out its a dud.


Edited by Spliff, 15 April 2017 - 10:17 PM.


#15 MrModeon

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 05:49 PM

Does anybody know how to grow mushroom truffles?

https://www.shroomer.../fpart/all/vc/1

 

Look there for a pretty much complete guide! I'm working on a few jars of Galindoi right now to kickstart my truffle production. 



#16 scott_1971_h

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 05:59 PM

 

Do you know of walnut trees would work well, i already have that.

Not to take this thread off topic, since talking about psychedelic sclerotia. However with truffles, from my limited understanding, I believe the roots need to be inoculated when planting the trees. Its not like you can dig up the roots and do it that way. I toured a truffle farm, and the guy there says they use a "slurry" when planting their trees. That is all I could get out of him, he smiled when I spoke about if it was like shiitake logs and dowels.

So from my imagination, I would think they would shape and flood the hole in a particular way that allows the tree roots to be in the slurry.

There are many different types of truffles, some are valuable and some are utter worthless / undesirable. Make sure you get the right one. I would imagine this affects the types of trees and soil you would use.

 

Beware of blight. There is an epidemic blight problem in some countries = no export, quarantine, plantation destroyed.

 

Interesting fact, the types of trees you use will affect the flavour of the truffle. The farm I visited had almonds, which was done to give a chocolate aroma.

 

You are aware truffles grow under ground right? You need a way to find them. Pigs are alright but they eat the truffles, so you need to be quick on the intercept. Dogs are the bomb. I know a guy who trained dogs for the police force, he now is a contractor truffle finder, brings his dogs to other people's farms and finds them. Takes about 45 minutes to run through a plantation, gets paid a percentage of weight value (What a dream).

 

Lastly, I think there is some risk in ordering pre-inoculated trees. Like, some will say they are but are not really. Also the type of truffle they say it is might not be. Low success rate on older saplings. My advice would be to purchase from a plantation directly that provides them. Tough ask but you don't wanna wait 5 years to find out its a dud.

 

Yes I've heard that you need to innoculate the roots when the plant is very young/seed.

The slurry will be a truffle (since they are the fruit) diluted and possibly with some nutrition.

I (think) walnut works but oaks work better.


Edited by scott_1971_h, 16 April 2017 - 06:00 PM.





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